Will Kasim Reed Lose Another Fight in the DPG?

It appears one Democrat doesn’t seem thrilled with DuBose Porter’s decision to run for reelection. And that Democrat is an important one.

Speaking to the Associated Press, Atlanta mayor Kasim Reed said he doesn’t think Porter “should be rewarded.”

A couple things to keep in mind about Reed, supposedly the most powerful Democrat in the state, and his comments. The first is that Reed backed former State Senator Doug Stoner when he and Porter were running for DPG chair a year ago. The other is that Reed lost that proxy war–pretty badly too.

With those things in mind:

“I do not believe the kind of failure we saw in November 2014 should be rewarded in politics,” Reed said, adding he didn’t appreciate Porter citing President Barack Obama as the reason for the losses. “I think he should have taken greater personal responsibility rather than blaming the president who did exactly what the party advised him to do, which was to stay away.

Reed also questioned the timing of a state party mailer designed to rally black voters by invoking the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.

“The Ferguson mail piece was a last-ditch attempt to generate enthusiasm that you should have been working at for a very long time,” Reed said, adding the mailer put Nunn on the defensive at a time when she’d been gaining traction in her attacks on GOP businessman David Perdue’s outsourcing comments. Reed said the mailer had a “significant impact” on independent and swing voters.

Reed alluded to a run for higher office in 2018 and didn’t rule it out. However, he’s painting himself into a very odd corner very early on. He doesn’t seem to have much support from DPG members as evidenced by not getting Stoner elected. He’s not entirely supportive of DPG leadership. On top of that, the strongest relationships he’s building in Georgia are with Republicans.

All that said, he has very strong support from D.C. and he will have a very excellent record as Mayor to fall back on (both of which are not inconsequential). But the above and his unnecessarily-thin skin are creating some serious political hazards for him.

12 comments

  1. Hosea says:

    Muhammad has never won an election, ANY election, other than his own. He has absolutely no chance to get a party chair elected or himself elected statewide.

  2. northside101 says:

    Counties won by Democratic/Republican candidates for governor (going back to 1998)
    Democrat Republican
    1998 118 41 (Roy Barnes/Guy Millner)

    2002 40 118 (Roy Barnes/Sonny Perdue)—Tie in Dooly County

    2006 29 130 (Mark Taylor/Sonny Perdue)

    2010 39 120 (Roy Barnes/Nathan Deal)

    2014 34 125 (Jason Carter/Nathan Deal)

    The rural votes—places like Toombs County (Vidalia), Ware County (Waycross) and even Dubose’s home are of Laurens County (Dublin)—account for a large portion of the victories of Perdue and Deal; in the top 40 counties of the state (measured by voter turnout), Perdue led Nunn by barely a single percentage point. (Those top 40 accounted for nearly 80 percent of the state’s total turnout—the top 10 alone account for nearly half of the state’s total votes.) But in the remaining, mainly rural 20 percent of Georgia, Perdue trounced Nunn by a 2-1 margin. Basically, if Democrats only break even in metro Atlanta (which was more or less the case with Nunn and Carter), they can’t win statewide, at least in the forseeable future, because the rural vote has so soured on the Democrats, of course not just here but elsewhere in the South like Appalachia (southwest Virginia, West Virginia), middle Tennessee, etc.

      • David C says:

        Indeed: It’s like someone coming along in 2004 saying the Democrats are in trouble because Kerry couldn’t win Wyoming or the Dakotas. It may be true, but it’s not what’s losing them elections and it’s not where they’re going to be doing better if they start winning them.

  3. northside101 says:

    Ed, not all the rural counties are losing population. A lot of rural counties for instance in Doug Collins’s 9th Cong District (such as Fannin, Gilmer and Habersham) have been growing for years. Any my point is that in the short term, the urban areas like metro Atlanta are basically a wash politically—the 29-county metro area went narrowly Democratic for Obama in 2008 and 2012 and ditto for Nunn and Carter two weeks ago, but the rest of the state—much of it rural–overall went heavily Republican. Some of the urban counties aren’t growing much either—DeKalb for instance grew very little between 2000-2010, so there aren’t many votes left for Democrats to gain in that county. Perhaps in the long term, say 10 years from now, metro Atlanta starts to become heavily Republican and then the rural vote becomes less relevant. But there isn’t any realistic scenario for, say, Hillary to win Georgia in 2016 if she only breaks even in metro Atlanta.

  4. SallyForth says:

    Exactly, John. This whole DPG chair thing looks like two mules rooting over a turnip, as my grandfather used to say. And nobody has figured out how to keep the turnip alive.

    • Ed says:

      Did no one read my post? :/

      “I do not believe the kind of failure we saw in November 2014 should be rewarded in politics,” Reed said,

      “The first is that Reed backed former State Senator Doug Stoner when he and Porter were running for DPG chair a year ago. The other is that Reed lost that proxy war–pretty badly too.”

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