Deal Hits Carter In New Ad

Governor Deal’s campaign stepped up it’s criticism of Sen. Jason Carter in a new TV ad.

Accompaning the press release was a series of items supporting the ad and refuting claims made by Carter’s campaign.

Here are the facts on Gov. Deal’s former business:
– Gov. Deal was never on the verge of insolvency and always had a positive net worth.
– Gov. Deal and his business partner built a successful venture from scratch. Unlike what Carter and President Obama might believe, they DID build that.
– The business sold for almost exactly what Gov. Deal said it was worth during the 2010 campaign.
– Upon being elected, Deal placed his financial assets in a blind trust. A blind trust is a mechanism by which day-to-day management and decisions are made by an independent trustee.
– Gov. Deal didn’t “get rich” in office. His personal financial worth went from a tangible business asset to a liquid asset.
– Gov. Deal has said repeatedly that Copart will pay every cent that it owes and has advocated that the case be determined by a court to remove any appearance of conflict of interest.

The full list of supporting items can be found below the fold.

Full list of items from the Deal for Governor press release:

Here are the facts on spending:
– $12.5 billion is a conservative estimate of Carter’s promises.
– He has said he would “fully fund” the education formula and has said we “underfund” education by $1 billion a year. That’s $10 billion.
– He advocates expansion of Obamacare in Georgia. The cost to the state would be $2.5 billion.
– CarterCare – which is the Arkansas model – would actually costs billions more than a regular expansion.
– Carter says he’d make up the difference by “cutting waste” even though he never offered any legislation to cut anything in the budget.
– On every issue raised during the campaign, Carter has advocated more spending, and he has never mentioned one budget item or program he would cut.

Here are the facts on HOPE:
– Carter proposed implementing an income cap on HOPE recipients that would eliminate many Georgia middle class families from eligibility.
– Just this week, after three years of presenting an income cap as a moral imperative, he could no longer defend his policy’s devastating impact on the middle class. Just like on school funding, he came up with a new election year position, saying an income cap is “too blunt an instrument.”
– The facts supporting Deal for Governor’s ad stand in stark contrast to the blatant lies in Carter’s commercials. – The most recent of these is an attack on Gov. Nathan Deal’s small business, Copart, which he built from the ground up.

Here are the facts on Gov. Deal’s former business:
– Gov. Deal was never on the verge of insolvency and always had a positive net worth.
– Gov. Deal and his business partner built a successful venture from scratch. Unlike what Carter and President Obama might believe, they DID build that.
– The business sold for almost exactly what Gov. Deal said it was worth during the 2010 campaign.
– Upon being elected, Deal placed his financial assets in a blind trust. A blind trust is a mechanism by which day-to-day management and decisions are made by an independent trustee.
– Gov. Deal didn’t “get rich” in office. His personal financial worth went from a tangible business asset to a liquid asset.
– Gov. Deal has said repeatedly that Copart will pay every cent that it owes and has advocated that the case be determined by a court to remove any appearance of conflict of interest.

30 comments

  1. David C says:

    “Built a successful business venture from scratch” with help for a steady no-bid government contract arranged while he was a state senator, that he violated House Ethics Rules trying to protect by doing his business dealings on the taxpayer dime. You didn’t “build that” Governor–Georgia’s taxpayers did. Not that repeating Mitt Romney’s old failed campaign slogans seems like a particularly winning strategy anyway.

  2. georgiahack says:

    I don’t know how much I would want to put that kid next to the words Untrustworthy, dishonest, and short on truth. I get where they are going with this, but to me it comes off as being mean to a kid who is trying.

    • Yeah, it’s obvious that they’re trying to paint Jason Carter as a little kid who has to keep lowering the bar, but again…if you’re only halfway listening to the words between commercials, you see a happy little face who gets inventive and tries until he makes it. Yay, kid – way to hang in there until you got it.

      • Three Jack says:

        Exactly how I saw the ad, a little MacGyver not accepting no for an answer. They screwed the pooch on this ad.

      • Rich says:

        I’d like Carter to respond to the “gift of gab” ads with one of Perdue’s baby’s whining “HE KNOWS MORE WORDS!” While lowering the bar, Deal would make a terrific Judge Smails in a Caddyshack spoof. We may as well measure them by height.

      • tribeca says:

        So if Jason’s caricature is a little kid that can’t shoot a basketball, what is Deal’s? Might a recommend the creepy, kinda slimy, very uncomfortable uncle you kinda pray never shows up to family get-togethers.

  3. Can someone explain to me how Jason Carter is concurrently supposed to be:
    1 – bad for education
    2 – desperate to raise our taxes by $10b to spend it on education.

    It seems to me that if he wants to spend $10b more on education than Deal, that probably means he will be an “education governor”. Probably our best ever.

    But don’t let my simple logic stop the Deal campaign’s floundering bumbles. Grandpa likes the new ad!

    • dsean says:

      There isn’t a tension between those positions. According to his critics, Carter wants to raise taxes to throw money at failing schools rather than continue the substantive reforms that Deal has pursued. He’s therefore “bad for education” and “desperate to raise taxes…” Your unstated assumption is that “spend more money” equals “good for education” which is why you see a tension there. Get rid of that assumption (which Deal and most Republicans have) and the tension disappears.

      I’m not saying you’re substantively incorrect, but Deal is advertising to his base and swing voters. I actually think the ad is relatively well targeted at middle class suburban women who are focused on education and concerned that Hope won’t be there for their kids.

      • They aren’t actually flushing it out enough. And the problem is that most people think that *their* public school is fine, so yes please let’s do throw more money at it. Where I live Lakeside/Druid Hills/Chamblee they would be thrilled if you wanted to throw more money at the public schools.

        As far as the idea that Jason is some sort of Manchurean candidate hell bent on destroying HOPE, that’s just too laughable to me.

  4. tribeca says:

    Has Carter proposed an actual dollar amount for a HOPE income cap? If not, is it really accurate to say it would restrict “middle class” access to HOPE? Oh, who am I kidding, Deal has a slippery relationship with truth.

      • Will Durant says:

        Perhaps it is because he no longer feels it is needed? The income cap of $140K was his proposal to save the HOPE 3 years ago. He has backed off of any cap during this election year which isn’t unusual from any politician. I personally feel a restoration of a cap at $250K would still be reasonable but doubtful that it would save all that much.

        A better question is why did the HOPE need saving in the first place? The Regents are completely appointed by the Governor and have been on a 12-13% per year pace of raising tuition and fees corresponding to 3-4% increases in their operating budgets. With a lot of unnecessary spending in those budgets from people that don’t have to answer to the voters.

        • John Konop says:

          Will,

          If someone makes 140k a year after taxes ie fed, income state, SS and Medicare, the person nets around 50 percent…..

          If i calculated the Carter plan right by your numbers….average joe family has about 70k to spend not including property tax, sales tax….Carter thinks that this family should be punished by taking 50 Percent of thier gross net income….per kid….that leaves them with 35k if they have 1 kid and no income if they have 2 kids in college and are paying for school…God help them if they have 3 kids…..Forget food they do not even have money for other taxes….You wonder why they do not think they are rich….even at the 250k amount tough math….

          • tribeca says:

            Except you’re acting as if they’ll be paying straight cash, up front for a UGA degree. Odds are they’ll take out student loans (which, is something Congress should get off their collectively worthless rears to fix).

            • John Konop says:

              In all due respect that makes less sense…..you understand with interest you pay even more? If a student has parents that make 90k a year, and they keep Hope no debt….and if your parents make 150k a year a mountain of debt and no Hope? Kids do not pick their parents….We do need to fix the student loan program….but that will not have any material effect on the above problem….The Warren plan lowers the interest rate….that would do very little…the core problem is the cost of education is growing way faster than GDP…..ie similar problem with healthcare….

          • Except your math is pretty wrong. Head of household with spouse and two dependents who makes $140,000 / year pays roughly:
            $7,000 state taxes.
            $20,200 income taxes.
            $10.710 payroll taxes.

            That assumes that they have a mortgage with $1,500/month in interest expenses that they can deduct, and that other than that and state taxes they aren’t deducting anything else. That’s a take home of $102,090 or 73%.

            • John Konop says:

              Chris you cannot have it both ways…You cannot count the deductions if you pay it in property taxes, sales taxes…….Even with your gleeful math it still does not work…No way can a family afford college education for their kids at the income bracket without massive debt…without HOPE…spin it away you want your math does not add up….If a family has more than one kid they are out of luck….

              BTW so many factors you left out…self employed pays the full boat on payroll taxes, 28% income tax bracket, medicare tax, average, health insurance……This is with our car payment, house payment, food, retirement, student loan payment……DO THE MATH….You and Carter need to realize not everyone is a lucky sperm club member…

              • The two choices in the HOPE debate were:
                Deal: Cap it for everyone and let the smartest (and usually wealthiest but not always) kids get more.
                Carter: Cap it for >$140k (or some number) and let people who earn less get more.

                So while I agree with you that just because you make $140,000 doesn’t mean you can necessarily stroke a check for some or all of college without any pain, how is it any easier for a family that makes the median income of $50,000?

                Only Deal’s plan took the hypothetical pain you think a $140k household would feel and applied some of it to the $25k, $50k, $75k, and $100k household too.

  5. rosco says:

    quote: “A better question is why did the HOPE need saving in the first place? The Regents are completely appointed by the Governor and have been on a 12-13% per year pace of raising tuition and fees corresponding to 3-4% increases in their operating budgets. With a lot of unnecessary spending in those budgets from people that don’t have to answer to the voters.”

    Well, you do know that the state has massively cut its contribution to the University System of Georgia, right? In fact, the state budget gives 17.9% less, or over $400 million less to the USG in 2014 than in 2009:

    http://gbpi.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/fy2014_Budget-Analysis_Ed_higher-ed_2.pdf

    It’s also worth pointing out that enrollment in USG schools has gone up over that same period. Deal’s “Complete College Georgia” plan hopes to increase enrollment even further by 2020.

    So let’s put it this way. Suppose you run a business and your operating budget to pay for overhead gets cut 17.9%. At the same time, you have more customers and are told to expect even more customers in the future. In this case, what must you do to keep your business open? Of course, you have to raise prices. Hence, tuition and fees have gone up at USG institutions.

    Tuition and fee increases have a lot less to do with supposed “waste” and a lot more to do with massive state cuts. After all, $400 million is hardly chump change.

    • I think the biggest factor in tuition increases, and why some sort of cap could actually do a lot of good, is the fact that the shrewdest consumers don’t have any skin in the game. And ironically, the Zell Miller Scholarship makes this problem worse, not better.

      The vast majority of students in Georgia have some combination of HOPE and student loans paying the bill. Thus, it’s very easy to increase the fees because functionally no one is paying in the present.

      And because everyone largely has to get the same thing (fees etc) there’s really no downward pressure being exerted.

      Imagine a restaurant that only serves all you can eat food. If you pass an aptitude test (the equivalent of the HOPE scholarship) you can eat there for free. If you can’t pass that test, you can still eat there and the cost will be financed over a period of 20 years. Now – don’t you think that restaurant (which gets paid by a combination of the state and lenders) is going to turn it’s all you can eat buffet into steak only pretty quickly?

      Now imagine if the people that could pass the aptitude test also had to pay 20% if they had the means to do so. I’d imagine we’d be back to chicken pretty quickly.

  6. rosco says:

    Chris,

    I continue to maintain that the cuts are a major driver of tuition and fee increases. Cutting $400 million and adding more students is a hardly a minor change to the system.

    That said, you definitely have a point that with HOPE and other forms of financial aid many students effectively don’t have skin in the game, although of course the loans do eventually come due and the problems you have described are nationwide. And in certain areas of higher education, there is a “steak buffet.”

    Unfortunately, this isn’t in the classroom, where class sizes have gone up, more and more part-time faculty and graduate students teach classes and faculty have received little in the wage of raises. The “steak buffet” instead are things that are tangentially related to learning (i.e. the whole purpose of education) such as athletics and plush new dorms.

    This may make me sound like an old fogey, but when I was an undergraduate in the early 1990s, most dorms and cafeterias in the state of Georgia were adequate, although pretty basic. As part of my job, I’ve been around to several schools in the USG and observed nice, new plush dorms and fancy cafeterias, all of which resemble more a resort than what I had as an undergraduate. And of course, every school seems to want more and more sports teams these days, all of which leads to huge fee increases.

    But here’s the rub; how many parents and students would find it acceptable to go back to the way things were say in the 1990s with dorms and cafeterias? And how many would be willing to put more money towards the classroom and less towards nice facilities or especially sports? Everyone likes to complain about the cost of college these days. However, I’m not sure if things came down to it if people would be willing to accept changes that would improve quality and lower the price. The real problem may be that people aren’t truly interested in education in the first place. Oh, and while this is certainly an issue in Georgia, it is a nationwide problem as well.

    • I agree with all of this, too.

      Look in a perfect world, I think everyone should get the HOPE scholarship to pay for 100% of college.

      Since we don’t live in a perfect world, for the reasons I outlined above and many others, I think Carter’s approach back in 2011 was infinitely better. Preserve 100% for “middle class” Georgians, even though John thinks if you make $140k you are middle class, you are not. Let the wealthy who never actually buy lottery tickets pay for some of their own education.

  7. rosco says:

    Chris,

    I agree entirely. All things considered, Carter’s approach of preserving 100% for middle class Georgians is far superior. And it’s just common sense. Comparatively speaking, the wealthy aren’t the ones with stagnant wages these days. Let them pay a little more for education.

  8. MikeS says:

    If Obama had his way, our families would be so poor we would still qualify for HOPE under a Gov carter.

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