AALAC Press Conference to Launch 10,000 Korean Vote Drive

August 29, 2014 9:39 am

by Joash Thomas · 6 comments

The Asian American Legal Advocacy Center (AALAC)  will host a press conference in its Atlanta office at 11 am today to launch the 10,000 Korean-American Voter Drive. The Center plans on launching this ambitious project by revealing the drive’s logo, ads and decals at the event.

As an Asian American myself, this news thrills me as there is so much more that needs to be done to engage Asian Americans in the political process. Hats off to AALAC for attempting to do just that. Nevertheless, as a Republican I have to wonder what kind of effect this would have on the General Elections this November in Georgia. I personally believe that Asian Americans have a lot in common with the Republican Party, especially when it comes to fiscal / economic issues as small business owners and entrepreneurs constitute a good chunk of the Asian American community in Georgia. However, there is still a lot more that the Georgia Republican Party can do to engage more Asian Americans with its candidates and platforms. Nevertheless, I digress (for now) as that is another post for another time.

I am however interested in hearing what thoughts y’all have on this voter drive. Do you think it’s realistic? What kind of an impact do you think it would have on the voter turnout and result outcome this November? Please discuss.

The following is from the AALAC’s official Press Release earlier this morning.

Asian American Legal Advocacy (AALAC) is holding a press conference today at 11:00AM to give press the first viewing of our 10,000 Korean Votes logo, banner, and sticker decals for use in our campaign to register and turn-out 10,000 Korean American voters in the 2014 mid-term elections. The conference will take place at our offices in Korea Town Plaza, 5302 Buford Hwy., Atlanta, GA, 30340.

The logo is available both in Korean and English, and was designed by a local Korean graphic designer. The logo is being used in the ongoing weekly ad series in Korean print, online, and television media. AALAC also created decals to be used by supporting Korean businesses and community members.

This campaign to register 10,000 Korean-American voters is part of AALAC’s push for translated ballots and Korean language assistance at the voting sites. “The 10,000 Korean Votes logo in the news, on stickers around Duluth and elsewhere – is being done not only to inspire Koreans to register and vote but to let everyone in Gwinnett County know that Koreans are a growing and powerful community,” said Helen Kim Ho AALAC’s Executive Director, “The more we lift our voices together through voting, the greater attention will be paid to the needs and concerns of Koreans.”

{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

George Chidi August 29, 2014 at 10:13 am

Interesting.

I wonder how much of a model this may present for other large immigrant groups in Georgia — people with ethnic origin in Mexico or China or India or Vietnam.

Joash Thomas August 29, 2014 at 10:41 am

Definitely. The AALAC also engages other Asian American ethnic groups like Indians and Chinese communities but it looks like they’re focusing only on Korean Americans for this drive.

George Chidi August 29, 2014 at 12:11 pm

I’ve been working with the Alliance of Nigerian Organizations in Georgia to help position them for better advocacy. The Boko Haram kidnapping caught the community out — Nigerians in America weren’t well-positioned to rally in force in public, nor present themselves to the media or press a case for intervention. ANOG is trying to fix that now.

Joash Thomas August 29, 2014 at 1:08 pm

That’s really neat! Sounds like a much needed mobilization force for the Nigerian community in Georgia.

Lea Thrace August 29, 2014 at 4:56 pm

I wasnt even aware such an organization existed here in Georgia. Thanks for mentioning George. I’ll be looking into this.

MikeS August 29, 2014 at 6:11 pm

Most of the Korean voters will fallow GOP state rep BJ Pac. Most of the older Vietnamese are Republican just like older Cubans are anti communist are historically Republicans. The Hispanic community will be split along economic lines.