GAGOP Executive Committee to Select Michael Brown Replacement on Aug. 26

August 22, 2014 10:43 am

by Ed · 17 comments

The GA Republican Party  announced the process to replace Michael Brown on the ballot in November, following the sudden death of HD-98 nominee.

On Friday, the GAGOP said its Executive Committee is accepting nominations for the position. Interested candidates may submit their nominations by 5:00 PM on August 24. Executive Committee members can submit nominations by 5:00 PM on August 25. Interviews will be done that day. The GAGOP EC will then discuss and vote on the nominees on August 26.

Full details on the nomination process can be found here. 

Brown would have been unopposed in November.

{ 17 comments… read them below or add one }

Buzz Brockway August 22, 2014 at 12:38 pm

I applaud the Georgia GOP for trying to make this unpleasant process as transparent as possible.

As I posted on Wednesday, Michael Brown was a good man and would have served the people of his district well. He will be missed.

Will Durant August 22, 2014 at 5:27 pm

I really don’t even feel right talking about the politics of this so soon as the funeral isn’t until tomorrow. I understand the urgency though given the time constraints. I really hope the committee will give consideration to the fact that Mr. Hancock was defeated by a 3-2 margin and has therefore already been rejected by the voters in the district.

My heart does go out to Mr. Brown’s family as I didn’t know him personally but I know his parents and he came from good people. I do know from my own life that there are no words of condolences adequate for the aberration of the natural order in having a child pass before their parents.

lacy2 August 23, 2014 at 5:31 pm

Me Hancock only lost by about 550 votes. And realize that Mr. Brown won with votes from less than 5% of the registered voters in District 98. I think the committee should not appoint anyone who was not willing to go the trial of a campaign. The process is to give us a chance to examine the candidates before they get into office and decrease our chances of ending up with the same problem when the official ends up in jail. Mr Hancock has been held up to scrutiny – nobody else has. I think he is the only choice that makes sense.

SabrinaWorks247 August 22, 2014 at 6:35 pm

Will Durant wrote: “I really hope the committee will give consideration to the fact that Mr. Hancock was defeated by a 3-2 margin and has therefore already been rejected by the voters in the district.”

David Hancock received votes from 39% of the voters. Anyone else chosen by the Georgia Republican Party Executive Committee will be someone who has not received one single vote by any resident of this district.

Will Durant August 22, 2014 at 8:13 pm

A majority of 61% of the voters saw what Mr. Hancock had to offer and voted for his opponent. Using your argument if Mr. Brown had been running against a reincarnation of Joseph Stalin then Stalin would be given the seat even with a single vote, presuming he would have voted for himself. I really don’t like that this is essentially a choice by a party committee for the seat but circumstance is demanding it in this case. It would be a shame to see the seat handed to the candidate who lost in what most would consider a landslide vote just because of the happenstance that he was the only opponent.

SabrinaWorks247 August 23, 2014 at 8:12 am

Will: Using your argument, the party committee could choose the reincarnation of Joseph Stalin. My objection to this process is that a party committee, not the voters, will choose the next state rep in district 98 and that new rep may not have received one single vote from the citizens in district 98. This is quite different from having an elected official appoint someone to fill an open seat. The party committee member are not directly accountable to voters in district 98.

Most, if not all, of those making the decision about who will be the next state representative for district 98 do not live in that district. What criteria will this party committee use to decide who will represent the people of district 98?

Buzz said he applauded the Georgia GOP for making this process as transparent as possible. Buzz, as a state representative from Gwinnett, and given your comment about transparency, I think you should explain to citizens what criteria the party committee will use in determining who will represent the people of district 98.

lacy2 August 23, 2014 at 7:21 pm

First of all, I didn’t vote against Mr. Brown. I simply voted FOR Mr. Hancock. And I think that is the case with most voters. It is very difficult to get someone to vote against something, people like to vote for something. After visiting both websites, I felt that Mr. Hancock’s views were more in line with my own. But if either candidate had died after qualifying but before the results were certified, the other candidate would’ve been declared the winner. And so they should have been. In fact, if Mr. Hancock had received 95% of the votes, but died on election day, Mr. Brown would’ve been declared the winner. And I would’ve been perfectly fine with that. Why should it be any different on the day after the election?

lacy2 August 25, 2014 at 10:25 am

I thought more about your claim that 61% voted against Hancock over the weekend and did some research:

1. People vote FOR someone, not AGAINST them
2. Mr. Brown grew up here, has friends, family, family friends, church backing, a business
3. Those friends voted FOR Mr. Brown, not AGAINST Mr. Hancock
4. They would have voted FOR him no matter who ran against him
5. Mr. Brown spent almost 4x what Mr. Hancock did – over $25,000 to Hancock’s $6,600
6. Brown had a professional campaign manager – it looks like Hancock ran his own
7. Brown had endorsement of all elected officials
8. Mr. Brown had sitting Representative Josh Clark and all of his campaign resources

I am really surprised he didn’t win by more than 578 votes. Actually, by your logic, you could say that 100% of the voters voted against all the other candidates that will be considered and only 61% voted against Mr. Hancock, so he should be the clear winner.

Will Durant August 25, 2014 at 11:17 am

“A majority of 61% of the voters saw what Mr. Hancock had to offer and voted for his opponent.”

I smell socks.

troutbum70 August 23, 2014 at 9:03 pm

David Hancock would be a fine choice for the voters of that District. It is very sad that Michael Brown passed away as the Gwinnett GOP was looking forward to working with him. Just because David lost by a certain margin doesn’t mean crap. Mr. Brown was also well backed by a majority of the Gwinnett delegation and well financed. I’m not sure why Mr. Durant has such an aversion to David but he is very knowledgeable when it comes to the taxes that affect all of us as well as constitutional issues. Mr. Hancock has also been an activist in the county party structure in Gwinnett.

Any one who lives in that district has an opportunity to throw their hat in the ring by tomorrow afternoon. And yes, it will be decided by committee Sabrina, not the best choice but unfortunately these are the rules for the time being. It will be headed by Jason Thompson, the 7th District chair that covers most of Gwinnett.

Will Durant August 24, 2014 at 9:59 am

http://www.gwinnettdailypost.com/news/2014/may/13/personalities-experience-set-apart-house/

Michael Brown, a small businessman, described himself as a “peacemaker.”

#“I love to bring people together and hear both sides of the story and find common ground,” Brown said. But he added, “don’t confuse meekness for weakness.”

#His competition, David Hancock, the co-chair of the Gwinnett Tea Party, said he wouldn’t mind making some noise.

#“I’m not going there to get along with people,” he said. “I’m going to be as loud as I can … and hopefully make a difference.”

#The two were also divided on the issue of relaxing rules on alcohol and allowing the use of cannabis oil for medicinal purposes, which was debated at the Legislature this year.

#“Hopefully we can agree that you can’t legislate morality,” Brown said, adding that he supports the medicinal use of cannabis. “It’s a ‘less government is more’ thing for me.”

#Hancock countered: “You can legislate morality. .. This country is a great republic but unless we have moral people … we are going to fall apart as a society,” adding that he is unsure of the research on the medicinal use of marijuana.

Georgia has had enough of this type. The US has had enough of this type. You cannot claim to be a constitutionalist as Mr. Hancock has done elsewhere, and at the same time seek to force your personal morals on others. I believe in having the civil liberties our forefathers intended and abhor the fact that our country imprisons more people per capita than any other country in the world.

Harry August 24, 2014 at 12:54 pm

Unfortunately, we have more thugs per capita.

lacy2 August 24, 2014 at 6:57 pm

Me Hancock only lost by about 550 votes. And realize that Mr. Brown won with votes from less than 5% of the registered voters in District 98. I think the committee should not appoint anyone who was not willing to go the trial of a campaign. The process is to give us a chance to examine the candidates before they get into office and decrease our chances of ending up with the same problem when the official ends up in jail. Mr Hancock has been held up to scrutiny – nobody else has. I think he is the only choice that makes sense.

And I didn’t vote against Mr. Brown. I simply voted FOR Mr. Hancock. And I think that is the case with most voters. It is very difficult to get someone to vote against something, people like to vote for something. After visiting both websites, I felt that Mr. Hancock’s views were more in line with my own. But if either candidate had died after qualifying but before the results were certified, the other candidate would’ve been declared the winner. And so they should have been. In fact, if Mr. Hancock had received 95% of the votes, but died on election day, Mr. Brown would’ve been declared the winner. And I would’ve been perfectly fine with that. Why should it be any different on the day after the election?

George Chidi August 24, 2014 at 8:36 pm

For all the talk about Hancock being the natural choice because he ran against Brown, I suggest there are several other people in this district who would have made excellent choices, but refrained from the contest simply to avoid splitting the electorate.

I think it would be deeply unfair to the electorate to punish it now for having the good sense to back one horse.

Buzz Brockway August 25, 2014 at 7:31 am

Sabrina,

You demanded I tell you the criteria for selecting one of these candidates. There are 28 members of the State GOP Executive Committee so I assume there are 28 different criteria. I’m not a member of the GOP Executive Committee so I have no vote.

I’m sure Mr. Hancock’s recent run will help him with some EC members, but the fact that he’s run for this very office twice unsuccessfully will hurt him with others. Wayne Hill also ran for this same office twice unsuccessfully but I doubt you’d like to see him appointed to the State House. Putting one’s name on the ballot should be a consideration in my view, but not the only one. Again, my criteria doesn’t matter much since I have no vote in this process.

This isn’t a perfect process but the alternative would be to hold a primary, a runoff, and then perhaps a third election (according to some legal experts) because Representatives must be voted on during a General Election before they can legally take office. That is a costly and time consuming alternative that may or may not yield a better result than having the State GOP replace the late Mr. Brown on the November ballot.

Ed August 25, 2014 at 7:49 am

Another primary would probably only have 28 Republicans voting on a new nominee… might as well save the state a bunch of money and have the GAGOP EC do it quickly. Also, I get why the expedience is leaving a bad taste in people’s mouth but imagine if this were a hotly contested race. There’s no time to lose, life has to go on etc.

Lawton Sack August 25, 2014 at 11:22 am

I was part of this same type situation back in 2012, when there was a Republican vacancy on the ballot for HD67 when Rep. Bill Hembree decided to run in the Special election for SD 30. I can say with all honesty that we, the Executive Committee, took the responsibility very highly and very carefully went through each and every nomination. We ended up selecting Micah Gravley as the nominee for the ballot, and I don’t regret that decision one bit. I can assure you that this process will be done with integrity and with the utmost respect for the voters.