CNBC: Georgia Number One For Business

June 24, 2014 16:50 pm

by Charlie · 11 comments

Is Site Selection Magazine still chapping your knickers because you’ve never heard of it?  Perhaps you’ve heard of CNBC?

The South rises again!

Georgia—the Peach State—slices up the competition in the 2014 America’s Top States for Business rankings by CNBC, signaling an apparent shift back to the Sun Belt from the energy-rich Northern Plains.

Always a contender, Georgia outdid itself in 2014.

The state scores a solid 1,659 points out of a possible 2,500, finishing at or near the top in three categories and in the top half in all but two. Since we began rating the states for competitiveness in 2007, Georgia has never finished outside the top 10 overall, with fourth-place finishes in 2007 and 2011, and a respectable eighth place in 2013.

That sound you hear coming from the East is Governor Nathan Deal, on a trade mission to Israel, doing a Mic drop.

{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

Conservative Brawler June 24, 2014 at 5:56 pm
ARAR June 24, 2014 at 5:56 pm

I guess the Carter folks still say, we should change Georgia as we are going in the wrong direction… looks like a good direction, let’s keep it going with our Governor Deal

The Last Democrat in Georgia June 24, 2014 at 6:54 pm

With our immense transportation assets and our generally lower-tax and lower-regulation environment, it is understandable why Georgia is very-highly regarded as a place to do business.

Chris Huttman June 24, 2014 at 9:24 pm

Georgia’s worst categories are Quality of Life and Education, finishing 32nd in both.

Read MoreAmerica’s top states for innovation

Poor health hurts Georgia’s quality of life. Twenty-nine percent of Georgians are obese, and more than 19 percent lack health insurance. Poor air quality doesn’t help in the category, either. And in education, local school districts as well as colleges and universities are still struggling with budget cuts.

Good thing that’s what Jason Carter is actually running his campaign on.

Will Durant June 24, 2014 at 9:45 pm

Of course a business likes coming to a state that will give them $60 million in tax credits.

David C June 24, 2014 at 11:41 pm

Suspect the Braves would rate Cobb County the #1 County for business. Doesn’t mean that’s a good deal for the taxpayers or valued by the voters.

seenbetrdayz June 25, 2014 at 5:34 am

Kind of makes you want to leave and come back.

saltycracker June 25, 2014 at 8:23 am

Better to try to fix our problems or look for a better job from an employed status……
Carter would do it from government largess….

Three Jack June 25, 2014 at 9:45 am

Nice recognition. How long before the crooked gov and his supporters take credit for this rating even though he has done very little toward the state achieving such recognition?

Will Durant June 25, 2014 at 6:40 pm

This quote from as reported by the AJC’s Greg Bluestein who is on the junket says it even more succinctly:

“And we didn’t buy this one, either,” said Chris Carr, commissioner of the state Department of Economic Development.

tribeca June 27, 2014 at 12:30 am

I was passing through the Minnesota airport on business a few weeks ago and saw a large advertisement touting South Dakota as Number 1 for Business according to some news outlet (it may have even been CNBC). I thought to myself, “gee that’s great, but I still wouldn’t want to live in South Dakota.” My reaction to this news is similar.

Being named the #1 place for business sounds great in a campaign ad or on an airport billboard, but what does that #1 ranking really mean for Georgians? I found this paragraph from the CNBC report rather telling:

“Poor health hurts Georgia’s quality of life. Twenty-nine percent of Georgians are obese, and more than 19 percent lack health insurance. Poor air quality doesn’t help in the category, either. And in education, local school districts as well as colleges and universities are still struggling with budget cuts.”

The reality is, the tax cuts and incentives we’ve provided to lure businesses have a cost. Up to this point we’ve sacrificed education and health in order to convince companies to move here. CNBC said that our educated workforce was a major factor in us obtaining the #1 ranking… how long can we count on a well-educated work force if we cut school funding (unless there’s an election comin’ up, y’all) at all levels? I graduated from UGA a few years ago, had to go to grad school out of state and look for jobs outside of Georgia because there was absolutely nothing of any real substance available in biotechnology & pharmaceutical space. Those are the type of jobs we should be trying to attract, not another low paying factory gig.