Common Core Implementation: Georgia Named a Leading State

With the successful defeat of SB 167 during the Legislative session, it’s nice to see that we are not only on track with implementation of better educational standards, but we are in fact a leading state in terms of implementation of Common Core.

From the Gwinnett Daily Post:

Georgia’s implementation of the Common Core educational standards was recently given high marks on a report from a nonprofit and nonpartisan education board.

The report from the Southern Regional Education Board tracked progress in 15 states and benchmarked five areas to find “leading states” and “strong states.”

Georgia was named a “leading state,” with the most comprehensive array of resources and materials and the most extensive efforts, in two areas: Teaching Resources and Accountability. Georgia was identified as a “strong state” in Timeline and Approach to Standards, Professional Development and Teacher and Leader Evaluation.

Let’s keep up the good work so that we can continue to prepare our students for life after a K-12 education.

13 comments

  1. Harry says:

    Let’s keep up the good work so that we can continue to prepare our students for life after a K-12 education. Sorry, we don’t have even a decent track record of good results so we can hardly “continue” to do anything. This is just more cosmetics and we’ll have to admit in 10 years that CC is a failure, just like NCLB etc. We have to start with the available DNA…that’s not so easy.

  2. Jon Lester says:

    Children need to be encouraged to use all the supplemental resources they can and not depend entirely on public school curricula. If I hadn’t had an encyclopedia, 4-H or a number of other things when I was growing up, my K-12 education might not have been adequate in itself.

    • Charlie says:

      And once again, we have the generic disillusionment with public schools being labeled under the “Common Core” banner. It’s a nice whipping post for those that like to find problems but can’t be bothered with the complications of finding a solution.

        • Charlie says:

          Nonresponsive reply designed to make you feel like you’re engaged but conclusive proof you have no idea what’s being discussed.

          • Harry says:

            Judgmental, ad hominem response designed to make you feel like you’re engaged but conclusive proof you have no idea what’s being discussed. Why don’t you see that there are two sides to be considered? It’s not all black and white.

        • analogkid says:

          Not to denigrate the work of kindergarten teachers, but I’m seriously wondering how rigorous the testing and data collection is at that level. There wasn’t a whole lot of empirical evidence in her missive to determine that it was overly burdensome. It could be that she’s right, but, on its face, it’s laughable.

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