Morning Reads for Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

March 25, 2014 6:15 am

by Stefan · 11 comments

Venice was founded on this day in 421, supposedly at noon, but your hugging of Venetians can be at any time. Morning Reads after the jump. 

Georgia:

  • Georgia’s gun law makes the New York Times (NYT)
  • Your permanent record is now digital (AJC)
  • Premature onions can still be Vidalia, maybe (AJC)
  • Many possibilities exist for Underground (AJC)
  • Undocumented dreamers sue to pay in-state tuition (AJC)
  • 1st amendment concerns plague Atlanta’s art proposal (CL)
  • Session over, primaries really begin (AJC)
  • Local Catholic leaders haven’t kept up with the Holy See (AJC)
  • Children left behind in legislative session (AtlBizChron)
  • The one great silver thief (GardenandGun)

National:

  • Why we love repetition in music (Aeon)
  • Is Amazon Bad for Books? (New Yorker)
  • The man who destroyed America’s ego: How a rebel psychologist challenged one of the 20th century’s biggest—and most dangerous—ideas (Medium)
  • How We Built the Ghettos (Daily Beast)
  • Facebook’s Plan to Conquer the World — With Crappy Phones and Bad Networks (Wired)
  • The War Nerd: Google’s Big New Dog (Pando Daily)
  • A vast hidden surveillance network runs across America, powered by the repo industry (BetaBoston)
  • Why the Dollar Endures (NYT)
  • US fishermen throw back 20% of their catch—often after the fish are already injured or dead (Quartz)
  • Key climate-change measurement imperiled (USA Today)
  • Why San Francisco Is Not New York (Bits)
  • How Obama Crippled a Russian Bank with a Stroke of a Pen (Fiscal Times)
  • Eau de Condo: Developers are using custom scents to get buyers to warm to a home (WSJ)

 

 

Harry March 25, 2014 at 7:02 am

I actually have no problem with Russia’s view on annexation of Krim, but if you read this you’ll get a clear view as to where Obama foreign policy leads and why the US is out of the picture. Not that being out of the picture is negative. The US needs to be less involved in practically every case.
http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2014/03/nature-abhored-power-vacuum-in-the-19th-century-apparently-still-does.php

saltycracker March 25, 2014 at 9:02 am

American Ego: downloaded it – Stefan Tuesdays do not fit the one minute manager mold.

Ed March 25, 2014 at 9:03 am

Regarding CTK/Archdiocese… the rectory was old, small and needed to be demolished. With the way the campus has grown its almost impossible to build something suitable on it (they’ve talked about building a new rectory when I was CKS, FWIW). So with the gift from Mr. Mitchell it allowed for a “new” rectory and a new home for the archbishop.

Anyway, more broadly, Archbishop Gregory and Monsignor McNamee are probably two of the best stewards you could ask for. I wouldn’t say there is anything wrong per se with their decisions other than the optics.

Ed March 25, 2014 at 9:04 am

Much like the Venetians, I can be hugged at any time as well–today or otherwise.

Eric The Younger March 25, 2014 at 9:10 am

Since you bring up Venice, they just voted to secede from Italy. It’s non binding but it was a whopping majority.

http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/03/europes-latest-secession-movement-venice/284562/

xdog March 25, 2014 at 9:35 am

Viva il Doge!

Venice isn’t going anywhere but Scotland could very well vote to leave the UK this summer.

Mrs. Adam Kornstein March 25, 2014 at 11:03 am

Venetians have be agitating to leave Italy for decades, this vote is just one of many.

The 2 million ballots cast is an interesting number since only 270,000 people live full time in historic La “Serenissima”, clearly the vote was open to the entire Veneto region -Chirignago, Favaro Veneto, Mestre, Marghera, Murano, Burano, Giudecca, Lido, Zelarino.

The region outside the historical area is highly industrialized and quite poor. The reasons to vote to leave could be more than historical.

Stefan March 25, 2014 at 10:52 am

I should also note that today is the 103rd anniversary of the Triangle Waist Factory Fire, an incident that killed 146 people and gave rise to worker protection laws (significant to me since employment law is what i do). Here’s the link for your super fun lunchtime reading: http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/trianglefire/story/introduction.html

Ellynn March 25, 2014 at 3:21 pm

The fire also gave birth to the ‘American Society of Safety Engineers’, helped push enrollment in the Womens Trade Union, and the suffrage movement nation wide. PBS had a great America Experiance show in 2011.

John Vestal March 25, 2014 at 1:50 pm

The Supreme Court of the United States heard combined oral arguments this morning in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores and Conestoga Wood Specialties v. Sebelius

Argument transcript available here, with a recap on the proceedings from Lyle Denniston of SCOTUSblog here.

Will Durant March 25, 2014 at 1:50 pm

This is a good time of year to visit Venice. Don’t go in late Summer unless your olfactory senses are deficient.

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