Recommended Weekend Anti-Obamacare Listening

Congress is in recess and some of your Congressmen are back home holding town hall meetings. I was honored to lead folks in the Pledge of Allegiance and give the invocation for the Lawrenceville town hall meeting of my Congressman Rob Woodall. Among other things, I prayed for peace. All I can say is imagine what it would have been like if I hadn’t prayed for peace.

The most contentious issue for Woodall right now is the proposal to defund Obamacare in the upcoming continuing resolution battle. As you are all aware it’s become a popular proposal. Woodall is of the opinion that such a strategy will not likely be successful and we should have that fight in the upcoming fight over raising the debt ceiling. Woodall maintains that strategy gives opponents of the ACA the best chance of success. Unfortunately, some are viewing Woodall’s position as one of support for Obamacare or a lack of courage to have the fight. Let me say this about Congressman Woodall, lack of courage is not a problem, he’s not one to check which way the wind is blowing before he decides what to do – if he were he would have jumped on board the proposal even though he clearly disagrees with it as a matter of strategy. Also, Woodall still held two live town halls and a telephone town hall this week, knowing folks would be upset with him for his stance. If you look around the country, you’ll find members of Congress who canceled their public meetings to avoid such confrontations. At the very least Woodall deserves credit for taking the tough questions and giving truthful answers.

Woodall was on the Erick Erickson radio show last night defending his position and you can listen to that interview here.

On a related note, Erick was a guest on the Coffee and Markets podcast talking about Delta, UPS, and the defund it proposal.

So, opponents of the ACA, what’s the best strategy to get rid of it? Defund it in the CR, the debt ceiling fight, or something else?

25 comments

  1. Harry says:

    The Democrats are going to miss a great opportunity if they don’t mount a serious candidate in the Seventh. Many conservatives will switch our votes just to be rid of Woodall.

  2. seenbetrdayz says:

    “So, opponents of the ACA, what’s the best strategy to get rid of it? Defund it in the CR, the debt ceiling fight, or something else?”

    Let Democrats own it. When people have as hard a time keeping their current healthcare plans, as they did trying to keep their houses when govt’ screwed up the housing market, you don’t want to be standing anywhere near Obamacare.

    I understand completely that the GOP doesn’t want to be seen doing nothing, but frankly I think it’s a trap. Rewind to the years pre-Obama, and recall that the GOP didn’t want to be seen doing nothing during the 2008 housing crisis, and democrats took full advantage of the situation when the GOP stepped into the manure.

    You gotta learn not to play with the evidence at the crime scene, ‘lest you go getting your ‘prints all over the place.

  3. Dave Bearse says:

    Woodall has upset the crazies that think a government shut down over Obamacare funding is winning politics.

    Will the idiots be mad at him when the idiocy of risking the credit of the US over Obamacare is rejected?

  4. Jackster says:

    “we should have that fight in the upcoming fight over raising the debt ceiling. ” – Isn’t this threatening to shut down the gov’t (not increase the debt ceiling) if Obamacare isn’t addressed?

  5. benevolus says:

    Praying for peace, meaning- if we show sufficient collective willpower, He will let peace happen?
    Seems bizarre. Or probably I don’t understand.

  6. jeffincher says:

    Extracting from Buzz’s post
    “Unfortunately, some are viewing Woodall’s position as one of support for Obamacare or a lack of courage to have the fight. Let me say this about Congressman Woodall, lack of courage is not a problem, he’s not one to check which way the wind is blowing before he decides what to do – if he were he would have jumped on board the proposal even though he clearly disagrees with it as a matter of strategy. ”

    I could not agree with you more about Congressman’s Woodall’s courage. Congressman Woodall can be courageous, charming and persuasive. There is a difference, however, between checking which way the wind is blowing and courage. Congressman Woodall and COS Derrick Corbett are shrewd enough to have measured and calculated the cost of his sticking to strategy above voter sentiment. Yes, he is paying price for holding to his position at his Town Hall meetings.
    The facts are clear that Congressman Woodall is very well funded inspite of the $15, 938 dollars showing in his 6/30/2103 filing. A quick check showed in 2012 cycle total contributions of $382,725 of which 13% came from persons within the District. So maybe courage is not what is driving his decision to buck the rest of the Georgia Congressional delegation and support the Speaker. Speaker Boehner, who has provided Congressman Woodall the opportunity to serve on some of the most powerful committees in Congress. The question for me is… Who is Congressman Woodall going to listen to Speaker Boehner or Jef Fincher?
    So as to your question as to the best strategy regarding the (CR) and ridding us of the (ACA)? I have have blogged extensively of late and provide a link to my thoughts. http://wp.me/p1DYCq-8n

    • I’m sorry – but having $16k in the bank at any time for a sitting Congressman is the exact definition of not well funded. Even $382k – what a joke. That’s nothing. Obviously he didn’t have primary opposition (or if he did it wasn’t real) in 2012 and that district is too Republican for now for a Democrat to win, but even in 2010 when he had a real primary he raised less than $400k. That’s a joke. People spend millions to win most open Congressional seats.

      • Woodall had a primary and general election opponent in 2012. He won the 2010 race (in which Jef participated) raising well less than a million. I’d have to look it up but I think it was less than $500k.

  7. jiminga says:

    The best strategy would be to allow Obamacare to run it’s course and capitalizing on the public’s broader knowledge of it as it actually takes effect…higher insurance costs, higher taxes, lower service, etc. It’s failing on its own today and will only get worse, so let’s let the liberals take all the credit. I can see 2016 from my front porch, when Republicans will control the WH and both houses of Congress. Until then, debt ceiling fights, de-funding the ACA, and government shutdowns will only deflect the blame away from the Democrats.

    • jeffincher says:

      In some respects that is like a patient being told by his physician let us wait a little longer and see how this manifests itself before we do an expensive surgery. All the while you the patient are getting weaker and weaker. This is no longer about the higher ground for Republicans and Democrats it is about the citizens of America.

    • Higher insurance costs? Maybe for some, but many more people will be eligible for plans in the individual market that come with a subsidy. Higher taxes? Again, only for people making over $200k or higher in some other instances or some device makers. Lower service? We’ll see – tell that to someone who can’t get service at all now at any price.

      I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again. Republicans don’t want to let this get implemented because they know once it is, people will like it. At the very least they won’t hate it. How do I know Republicans think this way? Because it was a REPUBLICAN idea. It used to be called Romneycare, before that it was the alternative to Hillarycare.

      The ACA is modeled on Romneycare. Romneycare both works and has been popular. 99% of that state is now insured. More than 60% of residents support the law, fewer than 1/3 oppose it. Sure – Mass is a more Democratic state than average, but on average a higher percentage of the state supports the law than voted for Obama. I don’t know if you are familiar with our 2012 election results, but a majority voted for Obama, which suggests eventually the same thing will happen nationally. Republicans might be able to marshal roughly 40% opposition for a little while, but you can’t build a national movement on that.

      Again back to my point – knowing this is the future if they just back off and let it get implemented, now do you understand why they are trying to do everything they can to stop it now – and also why so many Republicans that comment here and elsewhere who are smart enough to also know that support those efforts. They’d rather destroy the economy with a stupid debt ceiling standoff than pay the price for their political sins of doing nothing on healthcare for a decade when they had the chance.

      • Scott65 says:

        …and I will add to that excellent set of points Chis made. If the current insurance commissioner actually spent as much time implementing THE LAW instead of putting up roadblocks, he would have negotiated lower rates on the exchanges rather than gleefully announcing to the press that they were too expensive and his WORRY (which is about as sarcastic as I can imply) about it. Other states that did negotiate got lower rates…so for his thwarting the law he will screw Georgia residents with higher rates. Also…in the 2012 elections, the majority of voters voted for democrats in congressional races…funny how rigging the districts works doesn’t it

  8. Scott65 says:

    So he thinks shutting down the government (very inconvenient and irresponsible) should be passed up and the debt ceiling (FAR worse and catastrophic) should be used instead. He might have courage, but he certainly lacks in intellect. Lets review what happens in the remote possibility that this happens. Credit markets seize up way beyond what happened in the event of Lehman Brothers collapse. Interest rates skyrocket. If you have a payroll check issued by 3rd party…you wont get it because they wont be able to cover it (3rd party) because all these things operate on short term credit which breaching the limit will destroy. 401k’s…worthless. Investments…trashed. Great Depression II starts. This isnt overstated and I am not exaggerating. Breaching the debt limit is by far the worst thing.
    See, the republicans have a problem. They have lied to the base and those lies are coming back to bite. Most every (note most) members of congress know what a calamity this would be, and the problem with taking hostages is that you might kill the hostage even if you didnt intend on doing that at the start. Republicans are banking on democrats caving because they care more for Americans and will do anything to avoid this crisis and cave (as sick as that sounds)…problem is, their bluff will be called so republicans will end up having to cave…or trash the economy…they wont be able to deflect that blame and they know it

  9. Three Jack says:

    How to stop it? Only 1 possible way at this point, a concerted PR campaign including doctors, nurses and a few of the vast majority of citizens who actually pay for their healthcare whether through insurance or self funded. Expecting congress to defund something that they recently exempted themselves from is lunacy.

    And on the topic of courage, it is not courageous to hold a town hall meeting in front of unarmed constituents no matter how upset we may be. That is doing the job that you chose to pursue by voluntarily deciding to run for public office. If Woodall wants to show courage, volunteer for the Marines and ship off to Afghanistan or become a cop in SW Atlanta.

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