Contractors Chosen For Largest Project In GDOT History – $100 Million Under Budget

It’s hard to say we’ve “saved” $100 Million when we’ll be spending $840 Million, but if it works when shopping sales at outlet stores, we may as well recognize good news when we see it.  The project to expand capacity on I-75 and I-575 in Cobb and Cherokee Counties will cost significantly less than estimated based on the major contract bid awarded today.  From the AJC:

Northwest Express Roadbuilders includes Archer-Western Contractors, of Atlanta, Hubbard Construction Company of Winter Park, Fla., and the engineering firm Parsons Transportation Group of Pasadena, Calif. They bid $599 million for their portion of the work, shaving perhaps $100 million off the DOT’s estimated project cost. The total cost of the remaining work on the project is now estimated at $840 million.

Glad to see Georgia Department Of Transportation will be able to stretch the funds available for new projects a bit farther.  Or possibly speed up some deferred maintenance that is sorely needed around the state.

6 comments

  1. SmyrnaModerate says:

    Or the contractor has intentionally underbid to get the contract and then will be coming back for the money later as an inevitable cost overrun.

  2. sockpuppet says:

    $840 million to add toll lanes on an existing road. That will really ease congestion in Cobb and Cherokee! NOT!!! And Tim Lee’s $1 billion express bus proposal in Cobb appears to be extremely unpopular also because the folks who were against spending tax dollars then are no more willing to support it now. So, T-SPLOST opponents, how’s that Plan B coming together?

    I recall that when T-SPLOST supporters stated that if the measure failed, the next resort would be tolls. The Tea Party leader denounced such talk, claiming that the threat of tolls was just being used to scare people into voting for T-SPLOST and that no toll road direction would be needed because of the great Plan B alternatives in the works. What happened? Deal and the GDOT announce several huge toll lane – not road but lane – projects that most drivers are going to simply avoid. T-SPLOST won’t ease congestion? Well neither will these toll lanes. But they will put plenty of money into the hands of the private contractors that will build these lanes and collect the tolls! That’s what really matters, right?

    The T-SPLOST supporters predicted that nonsense like this would be the “alternative” if the plan went down. I wonder where the opponents who claimed otherwise are right now … what their opinions are on this. I remember Erick Erickson beating the “we can’t trust the incompetent corrupt GDOT to manage big projects” drum. Well now the GDOT and the governor’s office are running the transportation agenda for the whole state (except, that is, for the 3 regions where T-SPLOST passed, and those 3 regions are breaking ground for their projects already, and the city of Atlanta which is moving forward with the Beltline, streetcar and will start the transportation projects around the stadium next year) with no public input from anybody or any local projects. That’s better?

    I am sorry, but hundreds of millions on toll lanes that most drivers are going to avoid and are going to mostly sit empty just like the HOV lanes isn’t going to help matters. It actually makes things worse by redirecting funds away from things that would have. We really do need to hear from the suddenly silent voices that helped get us into this mess by being so vocal last year.

    • Dave Bearse says:

      The lanes will relieve congestion, but it remains to be seen if the relief is consummate with the expense. I understand about a half billion will come from general transportation funding, which is about one-half years total state funding.

      The principal beneficiaries? Well-heeled commuters in Cherokee and Bartow Counties. Not to worry though, they always pay more in taxes than what they receive in benefits.

  3. notsplost says:

    TSPLOST supporters also predicted massive job losses if it failed, which have not materialized. Last I checked metro unemployment was down over a full percentage point since the TSPLOST failed, and the dreaded caravans of angry businesses pulling up stakes and heading up I-85 for more enlightened pastures (cough, Charlotte) never materialized.

    Neither side had a monopoly on scare tactics, if my memory serves me.

    I do agree though that $840 million is a ridiculous amount of money and I doubt that the relief provided will be worth the cost. The real story nobody is talking about is that Americans are driving less as they age and at some point big projects like this will make little if any economic sense.

  4. notsplost says:

    TSPLOST supporters also predicted massive job losses if it failed, which have not materialized. Last I checked metro unemployment was down over a full percentage point since the TSPLOST failed, and the dreaded caravans of angry businesses pulling up stakes and heading up I-85 for more enlightened pastures (cough, Charlotte) never materialized.

    So neither side had a monopoly on scare tactics, if my memory serves me.

    I do agree though that $840 million is a ridiculous amount of money and I doubt that the relief provided will be worth the cost. The real story nobody is talking about is that Americans are driving less as they age and at some point big projects like this will make little if any economic sense. They will however continue to line the pockets of the well-connected.

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