Wilcox Sheriff Resigns

Facing federal charges for beating a prisoner and lying to federal authorities, Stacy Bloodworth resigned as Sheriff of Wilcox County. Bloodworth began his tenure as Sheriff in 1995.

I’ll say this–on three occasions I have dealt with the Wilcox County Sheriff’s Department and I have nothing positive to say about that department. (I did not deal with them on a personal matter, but in the course of my employment.) I’m not sure how much of that is attributable to Bloodworth’s leadership.

Beyond the present situation, the number of rural Georgia Sheriffs winding up in trouble with the feds is jarring:

In 2008 Telfair County Sheriff Jimmie W. Williamson was charged on counts of bribery and embezzlement and later sentenced to federal prison.

The following year, Jeff Davis County Sheriff Jimmy Boatright pleaded guilty to federal charges of bank and wire fraud and was forced to resign.

Last year Turner County Sheriff Roy Wiley stepped down following a GBI investigation in which authorities say he removed marijuana used to train drug dogs to give to a friend’s wife who was battling cancer.

And then there is Lawton Douglas, former Sheriff of Dodge County, who was convicted in connection with voter fraud. But Douglas didn’t blaze the trail, other Dodge Sheriffs had trouble with votes being being bought and sold.

So what’s the deal with Sheriffs in rural Georgia?

12 comments

  1. CobbGOPer says:

    “Last year Turner County Sheriff Roy Wiley stepped down following a GBI investigation in which authorities say he removed marijuana used to train drug dogs to give to a friend’s wife who was battling cancer.”

    He didn’t deserve that. The other guys were crooks. This guy was just trying to help someone alleviate their suffering.

  2. Wiregrass Dawg says:

    All roughly in the Ocmulgee watershed…something in the culture, maybe?

    Don’t have to go too far back to when Coffee County had some problems, either.

  3. They have virtually no accountability, and they know it.

    The way Georgia has the GBI structured, GBI will only come in to investigate a law enforcement involved crime if the law enforcement officers themselves (or technically a sheriff, police chief, sitting judge, or prosecutor) calls them in. Sheriffs don’t serve at the pleasure of a board, they don’t share their role with other people, and outside accountability is minimal.

    last year in Walker County a sheriff’s deputy was caught sleeping with two teenage girls (or kissing them as he said, which is legally the same) and the sheriff said the man hadn’t done anything criminal, only violated “office policy.” After declaring the deputy’s innocence, the sheriff conducted an investigation, confirmed his original declaration (nice when the cops tell you _before_ an investigation if the suspect is guilty), and let the officer resign to go do the same thing in some other community. And there’s not a thing we can do about it.

    Sheriff’s department employees realize what kind of corruption we have here, but they’ve had it made very clear what will happen to their jobs if they endorse another candidate, speak out in public, or even “Like” the Facebook page of someone running against their boss. Meanwhile the local media only runs what politicians tell them to do, and the Sheriff is such a Good Christian Man™ that anyone who dares challenge his decided non-Christian behavior is shunned by the community and accused of being hateful.

    We’d be better off without a Sheriff’s department here for the good it accomplishes under the current leadership.

    — LU

    • racinwithrex says:

      Sheriff’s department employees realize what kind of corruption we have here, but they’ve had it made very clear what will happen to their jobs if they endorse another candidate, speak out in public, or even “Like” the Facebook page of someone running against their boss. Meanwhile the local media only runs what politicians tell them to do, and the Sheriff is such a Good Christian Man™ that anyone who dares challenge his decided non-Christian behavior is shunned by the community and accused of being hateful.

      WoW and I thought it was just a “Dade County Thang”!!!!!!!! Well it’s just a mountain that seperates us….lol..lol..lol…..

  4. saltycracker says:

    In rural small counties the sheriff usually calls the shots. The more interesting question is in 2012 why the heck do they need administrations for such small segments of populations and then double down paying for “city” admins ?

    These citizens will accept bizarre behavior before consolidation.

    Telfair Co. population 12,000 or so
    Jeff Davis Co. 13,000 or so
    Turner Co. 9,000 or so
    Dodge Co. 21,000 or so

    • saltycracker says:

      Twiggs Co. some 10,000 folks with a county seat of 1,200. Step to solution: consolidation with other counties.

  5. eburke says:

    You may also have missed some issues with Sheriff’s in DeKalb and Clayton Counties over the last 10 years. The problem may not just be limited to rural counties but it could be with the power given to sheriff’s in the Georgia Constitution.

Comments are closed.