Gratuitous Iowa photos

Photo courtesy of Jason Mrachina.

Photo courtesy of Jason Mrachina
Photo courtesy of Jason Mrachina
Photo courtesy of Keith Turrill
Photo courtest of Keith Turrill
Photo courtesy of Groenling via flickr
Photo courtesy of Groenling via flickr
Photo courtesy of Groenling via flickr
Photo courtest of Groenling via flickr
Photo courtesy of Steve Woody
Photo courtesy of Steve Woody
Photo courtesy of Steve Woody
Photo courtesy of Steve Woody
Photo courtesy of Arkadiusz Wdowiak
Photo courtesy of Arkadiusz Wdowiak
Photo courtesy of Arkadiusz Wdowiak
Photo courtesy of Arkadiusz Wdowiak
Photo courtesy of Arkadiusz Wdowiak

7 comments

  1. Baker says:

    Fantastic photos. On Iowa however, my opinion is low. At the risk of infuriating Bill Evelyn, if Iowa goes #1 and #2 for Santorum and Paul, then I suggest the national party write them off completely.

    • Junius says:

      Opulent Northern state capitols circa 1890 always remind me that the victors take the spoils. Our Capitol building is just fine but no southern state capitol, save Virginia, can compare to the piles built after the war in almost every Union state.

      • Cassandra says:

        I was curious about the magnificent State Capital, a Renaissance structure completed in 1898 and the imposing mortar on the steps. Back then, Iowa was a Republican State, and reflected the fiscally conservative value of thrift and avoidance of excessive debt.

        Via Wiki:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iowa_State_Capitol

        “In 1870, the General Assembly established a Capitol commission to employ an architect, choose a plan for a building (not to cost more than $1,500,000), and proceed with the work, but only by using funds available without increasing the tax rate.

        John C. Cochrane and Alfred H. Piquenard were designated as architects, and a cornerstone was laid on November 23, 1871. However, much of the original stone deteriorated through waterlogging and severe weather and had to be replaced. The cornerstone was relaid on September 29, 1873.[3]

        Although the building could not be constructed for $1,500,000 as planned, the Cochrane and Piquenard design was retained and modifications were undertaken. Cochrane resigned in 1872, but Piquenard continued until his death in 1876. He was succeeded by two of his assistants, Mifflin E. Bell and W.F. Hackney.

        The building commission made its final report on June 29, 1886, with a total cost of $2,873,294.59. The audit showed that only $3.77 was unaccounted for in the 15 years of construction.[3]”

        Pretty neat. Oh and the imposing mortar?
        http://www.iptv.org/simplepleasures/story.cfm?id=2852&type=story
        “This particular cannon, which is referred to as a mortar, was used during the Civil War onboard a gun boat in the Mississippi, and it was used during the battle of Vicksburg and given to the state of Iowa after the war to remind people of the Civil War. ”

        To wit:
        http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/civil-war1.htm
        Mortar Boat

        “… the most specialized instruments at Porter’s disposal were the mortar boats. These were unpowered scows or rafts, each carrying one squat, kettle-shaped 13-inch siege mortar. The mortar itself weighed 17,120 pounds. With a full 20-pound charge, it could lob a 200-pound shell a distance of over two miles. During the siege of Vicksburg, thirteen mortar boats anchored on the western side of De Soto point, from where they maintained a steady barrage against the invested city. … ”

        Could you imagine the sound of a 17,120# mortar lobbing 200# shells 2 miles, while standing on a dinky raft? WoW!

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