That Smell From The West End Should Stop After 7pm Tonight.

Because that’s when the polls close, and one of the stinkiest runoff elections in the history of Atlanta School Board elections will come to a merciful end. Loss prevention specialist Byron Amos and consultant Angela Brown have been fighting for the seat formerly held by former Atlanta resident Khaatim Sherrer El. Amos took some tough questions heat earlier this year for being a vice president at UGK Records which produces hip-hop music. (Note for my fellow Republicans of the pasty persuasion: ‘hip-hop’ is an urban ‘music’ that often glorifies drug use, violence, and sex, and uses bad words in their lyrics. It’s all that black kids had left for music after white people used Elvis and the Beatles to steal rock and roll from them.) Earlier this year, Brown survived a residency challenge -in spite of working as a part-time pastor at a Church in Alabama. But now that Brown and Amos are in a runoff, things have gotten weird.

Brown gave an interview to the Atlanta Progressive News in which she said: “…on issues of gender-bending or cross-dressing, I am definitively supportive of students doing that.” Somebody sent a mailer that referenced the article, and included the quote, which Brown’s defenders at APN, the Georgia Voice and The Advocate say “misrepresents” her position. (Here’s the link to the original APN story, decide for yourself.) Amos has denied sending the mailer.

 

Khaatim Sherrer El has attacked Amos in defense of Brown. And now Somebody has sent another mailer linking Brown to disgraced former Atlanta school superintendent Beverly Hall, State Representative Rashad Taylor and State Senator Vincent Fort. No word on who will defend Brown against this latest salvo.

As the polls close and this runoff comes to an end tonight, I want you to listen carefully to the sound of Fortune 500 companies across the country that might be looking to relocate to a city with a functioning school system that produces a labor-ready workforce -one with which they would trust their employees’ children. You will not hear them considering Atlanta.

23 comments

  1. I Miss the 90s says:

    Wow, Mike. “Note for my fellow Republicans of the pasty persuasion: ‘hip-hop’ is an urban ‘music’ that often glorifies drug use, violence, and sex, and uses bad words in their lyrics.”

    That is extraordinarily ignorant, even for Peach Pundit. Hip-Hop does not often discuss those things, the hip-hop you hear about does. It would not be fair for me to criticize country music as that “country is a red-neck ‘music’ that often glorifies spousal abuse, violence, racism and the importance of one’s canine companions…and uses poor English in its lyrics.”

    This is the issue with stereotypes: they frequently lead one to commit logical fallacies.

    • Charlie says:

      “country is a red-neck ‘music’ that often glorifies spousal abuse, violence, racism and the importance of one’s canine companions…and uses poor English in its lyrics.”

      You left out dirt roads. I think there is a law in Nashville that every new song must include a dirt road reference. Gravel roads are acceptable.

      • Ken says:

        And TRAINS! How could we leave out the subject of countless Peach Pundit postings?

        IMT90s, Please refer to the wonderful, late Steve Goodman’s (though he was a Yankee from Chicago) excellent song, re-written at the behest of David Allen Coe, You Never Even Called Me By My Name, before commenting upon country music.

        And 90s music generally sucked like a Hoover modified by Tim Allen.

        • Charlie says:

          Yes. “I” remember the requirements. Trucks, Trains, Momma, Prison…

          This new generation of suburban redneck wannabe no talents seem to think it’s somehow about dirt roads. I’d be willing to bet many of them have never seen one, much less driven an actual pickup truck on one.

          • Ken says:

            Charlie,

            I never had any doubts that you were aware of Goodman’s gem (Though The City of New Orleans and the under-appreciated Videotape and My Old Man are stellar) because of your deep cultural appreciation for the arts – and consuming adult beverages where such musical genius is provided by music vending machines.

            I also doubt the suburban redneck wannabes have had the great pleasure of having a vehicle towed out of a muddy, clay ditch by a tractor, much less of doing the actual towing.

            • saltycracker says:

              You got a tractor to pull you out ? Snob…..all we had were an ax, jacks and maybe a come-a-long…..but then we were usually miles from civilization….

              I lived on a dirt street… sad day when it got paved…..we were crackers & good ol’ boys, went to church with grandma, respected our parents, hunted legit in 4×4’s and did nice things for the elderly poor (those with well water & outhouses)……

              as distinguished from rednecks & trailer trash who drank ‘shine, poached, picked fights, disrespected elders and yelled foul things out of rusty pickups…..

              interesting how time has altered definitions…..

    • Well, Miss 90’s, the hip-hop in question was called out for doing exactly that, in this instance. (FYI, so was rock and roll, back when it was new.) And while I know of no country music that glorifies racism, there might be some that does and you would be perfectly within your rights to stereotype and criticize all country music as doing so, so have at it!

      Saying that something does what it does isn’t really a logical fallacy.

      • I Miss the 90s says:

        I could care less about the right to stereotype, the fact is when you aggregate a stereotype to a population based upon a biased sampling of “lower-level” observations you commit the ecological fallacy. I am correct, you are not.

        Don’t quit your day job…unless you are a trial attorney or research scientist.

        • Missy, I think you meant “couldn’t care less.” But that’s OK, everyone knows what you meant, so your error in using the King’s English should allow you to keep your day job as well. Unless you have to write anything.

        • Ken says:

          IMT90s,

          Seriously, what does the environment have to do with a lack of logic?

          And just as seriously, as a “Republican of the pasty persuasion” – I thought it was funny. In case you haven’t noticed, we do humor here. Life is too short to take everything seriously and we’re all enjoying your initial salvo at our buddy, Mike.

          That is extraordinarily ignorant, even for Peach Pundit.

          There is the possibility that we will continue to do so for a long period of time. You don’t mind, do you?

  2. rense says:

    “Somebody sent a mailer that referenced the article, and included the quote, which Brown’s defenders at APN, the Georgia Voice and The Advocate say “misrepresents” her position.”

    So, we got a lady preacher from Alabama who defends cross-dressing, and TWO gay-themed magazines A) claim that she was misrepresented and B) accuse folks who make an issue of it of being “anti-gay” (to quote the title of the video above). And Khaatim Sherrer El, who no longer lives in the city, joins ranks with the Alabama lady against the guy who A) actually does live in the city and B) has business experience as the VP of the company (in contrast with the professional activist/agitator sort that usually gets elected in Atlanta, and you see the results). And gee, the folks going after Amos over his working for the hip-hop industry … where were they during the (rap mogul lawyer) Kasim Reed race against Mary Norwood? It is clear who the Atlanta establishment likes in this race: the Alabama lady preacher who wants to promote cross-dressing among her students. Private/parochial schools anyone? At least a parochial school not associated with the Alabama lady preacher who wants the students to cross-dress before Bible class … for the boys to dress like Mary and the girls to dress like Joseph for the Christmas pageant.

    Note for my fellow Republicans of the pasty persuasion: ‘hip-hop’ is an urban ‘music’ that often glorifies drug use, violence, and sex, and uses bad words in their lyrics. It’s all that black kids had left for music after white people used Elvis and the Beatles to steal rock and roll from them.”

    As for that little nugget … I would just like to point out that rock music, country music, movies, video games, cable television, and even at times network television – none of which are “urban” – are as guilty of the same, if not more so. It is just that the offensive content in those mediums are nowhere near as controversial as they have been in hip-hop, even though they should be. Where pretty much everyone was against hip-hop music as recently as 10-15 years ago (now it is nowhere near as controversial … it has now been co-opted by Disney and by Christian rock) the only people who used to be against the very same content or worse in movies, TV, rock/heavy metal music etc. were the fundamentalist preachers. It was surreal back in the day to see MTV rail against hip-hop one minute and then show a Metallica, Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, Guns-N-Roses or Marilyn Manson video the next. So it isn’t that they were WRONG about the destructive content of hip-hop, but the problem was the double standard.

    And you are correct: country music is not known for overtly racist content. As a matter of fact, lots of blacks used to listen to country music, and some black artists tried their hands at recording it (Charlie Pride and Ray Charles come to mind). This was back when – oddly enough – some aspects of our culture was less polarized … no one ever called Charles a “sell out” for making country music back in the day, for instance.

  3. The Last Democrat in Georgia says:

    “As the polls close and this runoff comes to an end tonight, I want you to listen carefully to the sound of Fortune 500 companies across the country that might be looking to relocate to a city with a functioning school system that produces a labor-ready workforce -one with which they would trust their employees’ children. You will not hear them considering Atlanta.”

    Which other cities would Fortune 500 companies in Atlanta be willing to relocate to? Would those Fortune 500 companies be looking to relocate to someplace like Detroit, where kids rob each other for their shoes and clothes, or Chicago, where kids from different school districts kill each other after their schools are closed and merged and the corporate tax rate was just raised by 64% this year, or New York where the stifling and suffocating government bureaucracy threathens to choke the school system to death, or Washington DC, or Los Angeles, etc?

    Inner city school districts suck everywhere and Atlanta is no exception, though, despite the cheating scandal, Atlanta Public Schools are still not even in the same universe of inner city educational misery as a Los Angeles, a New York, a Washington DC, a Chicago or, especially, a Detroit.

    Also, to say that Fortune 500 companies will flee and avoid Atlanta because of a few problems that are often typical in inner city school districts everywhere ignores the fact that Atlanta has many outlying and surrounding suburban school systems (Douglas, Henry, Cobb, Gwinnett, Cherokee, Forsyth among them) and intown private schools that just totally kick a**.

    People can be pretty down on schools in Georgia, but one can point to quite a few other states, especially in the Midwest (Midworst) that are much worse.

    • I was talking about F500 companies that might be coming here, but OK. Current metro Atlanta companies might be relocating to any of the cities listed in this article.

      http://www.forbes.com/sites/danielfisher/2011/04/26/tables-americas-best-school-districts-for-your-housing-buck/

      You’ll be hard-pressed to get me agree that Georgia’s reputation for education is “kick-a**,” justified or not. Add that perception to unaddressed traffic issues, as-yet-unsolved water issues, and tell me why a company -any company- would want to come here. Just because everyplace else sucks isn’t going to cut it.

      • The Last Democrat in Georgia says:

        I didn’t say that all of Georgia kicks a** in education, as I agree that schools in Georgia could use some work on the whole. I just meant that the schools here are not as far gone as many seem to think and that there are some districts in particular, especially in the suburbs and exurbs around Metro Atlanta that are doing a pretty decent, if not exceptional, job in many cases of educating children with the resources that they’ve got to work with.

        I agree that Atlanta has its issues, but we’ve still got a helluva lot going for us like location, climate and even some very good schools in many places.

      • The Last Democrat in Georgia says:

        “Add that perception to unaddressed traffic issues, as-yet-unsolved water issues, and tell me why a company -any company- would want to come here.”

        Sorry that I’m just now getting back to you on this as I got busy, but to answer your question, in spite of the issues you raised, companies would still want to move to the Atlanta Region and Georgia, again, because of the great location (logistical advantages of being the home to the world’s busiest airport, one of the fastest-growing seaports on the planet out of the path of direct hurricane strikes and multiple interstate highways), great climate (especially when compared to Northeastern and Midwestern states), natural beauty (lots of lush greenery, hills, mountains, lakes), a robust prep and college sports culture (that is the home to a member institution of both the SEC (UGA) and the ACC (GT) and a third institution (Emory) that could probably be a member of the Ivy League if it so chose) that, despite some struggles in public education, still places a high value on post-secondary education as seen with the very high number of residents who are college graduates.

        Issues with traffic, water and even education and governance are growing pains that many other major cities (New York, L.A., Chicago, etc) have struggled with at one time or another in their histories and continue to struggle with to this day in many regards (What former Illinois governors have NOT been to prison after leaving office?).

        Don’t be so negative as there are many towns, especially in the Snowbelt/Rustbelt (see Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo) and even in the Sunbelt, that, despite the downturn, would just absolutely love to have Atlanta’s problems.

        Do you know how many towns would just absolutely love to have had the 100%-plus growth rate (from 2.9 million residents in 1990 to 5.8 million residents in 2010) that the Atlanta Region has had over the past 20 years?

        There’s no denying that Atlanta is facing many challenges, but don’t be so down because this city, this region and this state will rise to the occasion and find a way to deal with and overcome the challenges it faces in traffic, water, education and its economy and will come out an ever stronger competitor because of it.

        Big city growing pains, it happens.

  4. saltycracker says:

    The best school list is a strong case for the outlying cities around Atlanta to pay more attention to schools, parks, executive housing and roads/transportation. Many on the list are even in neighboring counties to a business/economic hub.

    Businesses are in “Atlanta” because it is the economic center of the Southeast & an airport hub.
    Companies that need to interact with other businesses for whatever reason will be near each other.
    Haven’t looked at in years but to even do business with those using the ports, their offices were in “Atlanta”.

    Paradoxically, Republican businesses need strong communities near unsalvagable cities like Atlanta.

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