Republicans for Barnes

Here’s something for you guys to chew on.  Even if Democrats pick up a few trending seats here and there, the Republicans will almost certainly retain solid majorities in both houses of the legislature.  I know there are things that some of you didn’t like about Roy Barnes the first time he was Governor.  But at the same time, he’s proven that he’s hard working and can be successful at moving things through the legislature.  The CATO institute and others said he was the best Democratic Governor in the country back then.

He balanced the budget for four years, put money into reserves, cut property taxes by billions (despite what Casey Cagle says to Politifact, ummm Mr. Cagle the escrow portion of my mortgage went up over $100 a month to pay for your “budget balancing”) and was willing to use his political capital to make tough decisions for the state.  Love him or hate him – you also have to admit at this stage of the water crisis, now that things have the potential to get quite litigious, that he’d be tough as nails in that role.  I know I’d call 888-KING-ROY if I needed a lawyer.

So here’s the thing for you guys to ponder, specifically the ones who said that if Oxendine was the nominee you’d vote for Barnes.  Now that Deal has basically morphed into Oxendine on steroids why not give divided government a shot?  Let Roy check the excess of the Republican legislature and vice versa.  If it works out everyone wins.  If you decide against it, at least you can get Karen Handel or someone else in 2014 instead of being stuck with Deal until 2018 or Chris Riley has enough money to retire, whichever comes first.

This is a sophisticated appeal to the blogging crowd, you likely won’t see it on the airwaves.  But people that read blogs like this and their friends and families could swing a close election.  I hope you’ll give it some thought particularly in the privacy of the voting ATM.

46 comments

  1. Chris says:

    And let us not forget that Roy Barnes did more for the free market in Gwinnett than the “Republican” about-to-be-indicted/resigned-in-disgrace County Commission ever did.

  2. TedLee says:

    Uh, nice revisionist history. Barnes was an unmitigated disaster. We were dead last in education. He treated Georgia’s teachers horribly. Deal is far from the ideal candidate (I would have preferred Handel), but between Deal and Barnes it’s no contest.

    Roy Barnes was fired by Georgia voters 8 years ago. Why would we hire somebody we fired for poor job performance again?

      • TedLee says:

        As someone who is married to a teacher, and has many friends who are teachers, I don’t find it tired. I find it incredibly relevant.

        His attitude towards teachers was reflected in the state of Georgia’s entire education system. We definitely don’t need to return to those days.

        If Deal isn’t your speed, vote Monds. A vote for Barnes is a vote for complete incompetence.

    • Crazy4Freedom says:

      Well said TedLee. I keep hearing do not vote for Deal “he is bad.” Well so is Barnes and “he is real bad.” He is so bad he was fired. If your argument is do not vote for Deal then it needs to be vote Monds. There are 3 people on the ballot. I’m personaaly choosing Deal. I was dealt a 3 card hand and I have to play (vote) one of the cards I have. If you can’t bring yourself to vote for Deal I say vote Monds. Barnes is a no option for me and all the “Republicans” saying they are voting for Barnes on here are flat crazy if they think that is a better choice.

        • TedLee says:

          Newsflash Kyle: Georgia is a red state.

          Of course, I wouldn’t expect anything less of a liberal than to resort to name calling when they don’t like the direction the debate is heading in.

          • B Balz says:

            I bet kyleinatl knew this is a Red State, TedLee.

            I have stated many times that the LP should show the largest recorded vote in their history in Georgia, this cycle. I have also said that if they fail to do so, they should not quit, but keep at it.

            The LP should refine their message and get a mainstream messenger. (I don’t think that GA will ever accept a ‘stay-at-home Dad as Governor)

            No offense to Mr. Monds, who I am sure is a good man, but that is not a credential most find compelling. That’s not a value judgment, being a stay at home parent is plenty tough, but not as the job before Governor.

            • polisavvy says:

              I agree with you about the whole credential thing. If the LP’s had gotten a more viable candidate in the race, this thing could be heading to a runoff right now. Also, having been a stay at home parent of two sons fifteen months apart, I don’t think I would have had enough brain cells left to be Governor. I barely have enough left now and they are 25 and 24.

          • kyleinatl says:

            Ted,

            Did you read Crazy4Freedom’s giant-run on sentence? Come on man. The “husband of a teacher” should understand what I’m getting at.

            But thanks for the insinuation.

            • Crazy4Freedom says:

              I always love when people are loosing an argument on a blog and start pretending we are all in high school english class.

              • B Balz says:

                Crazy4Freedom: I would not characterize two brief exchanges as an argument. The title of this thread reminds of the “Jews for Jesus” movement….

              • kyleinatl says:

                Thank you for continuing to prove my point.

                And Thanks B, I was wondering myself: “what argument?”

    • Holly says:

      From PolitiFact:

      Let’s start with the first claim, that Georgia was “dead last in education” when Barnes was governor. Barnes was governor from January 1999 to January 2003.

      RGA communications director Mike Schrimpf said there were two explanations for the first claim. First, he pointed to a Manhattan Institute report published in 2001 that found Georgia had the lowest high school graduation rate of any state. We found the report and, indeed, it found Georgia was last in graduation rates. The report, however, was about students who graduated in 1998, which was the year before Barnes took office. (Note: The study’s authors later noted an error in their graduation rate methodology and said it corrected the mistake.)

      We decided to look elsewhere for graduation rate data. The National Center for Education Statistics, which is part of the U.S. Department of Education, looked at graduation rates in 2001-02, which included Barnes’ last full year as governor. That year, Georgia’s rate was 61.1 percent, which ranked 47th, ahead of New York (60.5 percent), Tennessee (59.6 percent) and South Carolina (57.9 percent). Schrimpf noted that Georgia and Florida were tied for the lowest graduation rate among students who graduated in 2001, according to Manhattan Institute research.

      The RGA’s second argument for claiming Georgia was “dead last” in education focuses on SAT scores. In 2002, Barnes’ last full year as governor, Georgia ranked last among the nation’s 50 states in the average SAT score.

      Some education scholars said at the time that there are several explanations for Georgia’s woeful ranking. Other states had a higher percentage of their best students who took the exam, Gregory Marchant, an educational psychology professor at Indiana’s Ball State University, wrote in an op-ed to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Marchant and others also noted warnings that state comparisons using SAT data are invalid. The College Board, which administers the SAT, told PolitiFact Georgia as much when we looked at a candidate’s claim that Georgia’s SAT scores were lower than neighboring Alabama.

      “Not all students in a high school, school district or state take the SAT. Since the population of test-takers is self-selected, using aggregate SAT scores to compare or evaluate schools, districts, states or other educational units is not valid, and the College Board strongly discourages such uses,” the College Board said in a statement.

      On the ACT, the other test frequently used as an indicator of college potential, Georgia ranked near the bottom during Barnes’ term, which began in 1999 and ended in January 2003. The Peach State was ahead of other Southern states such as Louisiana, Mississippi and South Carolina in each full year of Barnes’ term.

      We gave outgoing Attorney General Thurbert Baker a Half True rating in June when he used Georgia’s SAT scores to claim they “are right at the bottom.”

      Education is a funny thing. We dump millions of dollars into it, but we don’t get the better results we expect. Why? I’ve turned into a realist on the issue. High school isn’t for everyone. Yes, it’s hard to get a job now without a degree, but some people are not successful students. That’s why the GED exists. I don’t think graduation rates are going to continue to improve. I don’t think they can. Kids unfortunately have limits on their will power and intelligence. “No child left behind” is a terrific slogan, but it’s not at all reality.

      That said, I don’t think Georgia is wrong for encouraging students who want to go to college to take the SAT. The state doesn’t limit who can take the test (hello, North Dakota) to get a better ranking. I think anyone who has the desire to pursue college should be allowed to do so, and they shouldn’t be limited to taking the ACT if they’re considered “dumb” or “underachieving” or whatever term those states assign to it.

      Full disclosure: I was a big Purdue supporter. I was a teacher. I hated Roy Barnes in 2002.

      BUT, as a former teacher who just happened to be in the classroom when Roy Barnes was the governor, I can tell you that teachers all got really angry over the fair dismissal rights issue. However, I honestly cannot name one person I worked with or knew at other schools who was actually affected by the policy before or after its reversal. I’m glad it was reversed, but it wasn’t exactly the plague that GAE and PAGE made it out to be.

      • TedLee says:

        That’s some logic Chris. We’re talking people, not parties. If a particular Congressional Republican who was fired 4 years ago was running, I doubt they would have anybody’s support. But just because some Republicans in the past didn’t practice fiscal responsibility, it doesn’t mean you write off every new Republican running for Congress.

        Nice try though.

        • ACCmoderate says:

          The party is being run by the same folks that were fired by the American people just 4 years ago. Why should we give them a shot?

        • kyleinatl says:

          Ted, do you write off every Democrat running for Congress as well regardless of their stance on whatever your pet issue is? Just curious.

          • ZazaPachulia says:

            “But just because some Republicans in the past didn’t practice fiscal responsibility, it doesn’t mean you write off every new Republican running for Congress.”

            So lets get some new Republicans running for Congress! Go Austin Scott!

            Out with the old, in with the new! Those party-switching big government corrupt Republicans of days past need to be sent packing to Chris Riley’s retirement cabin in north Georgia. They certainly don’t need to simply walk into the state of Georgia’s most important elected office.

        • bgsmallz says:

          Fun with quotes…

          TedLee said:

          “If a particular Congressional Republican who was fired 4 years ago was running, I doubt they would have anybody’s support. But just because some Republicans in the past didn’t practice fiscal responsibility, it doesn’t mean you write off every new Republican running for Congress.”

          Here are my happy-fun time replacements in parens:

          “If a particular Congressional Republican who (quit while under investigation months) ago was running, I doubt they would have anybody’s support. But just because some Republicans in the past didn’t practice fiscal responsibility, it doesn’t mean you write off every (old) Republican running for (Governor).”

          It’s like Mad Libs!!!! Wheeee!!!!

    • SFCWallace says:

      Georgia re-electing Barnes would be like the Falcons hiring Norv Turner. Good name recognition, but zero chance at the Super Bowl.

  3. I Am Jacks Post says:

    Clint is driving his minivan to the polls. It seats 8 comfortably (9 scrunched). I’m sure there’s still room aboard his “Republicans for Barnes Election Day Carpool.”

    • bgsmallz says:

      So if there was a Democrat majority in the house, you would be voting for Barnes?

      That is just incredibly silly logic that leads no where but in a circle.

      Honestly…there is so much conjecture and no support for many of those statements and the circular logic that applies to Georgia because the GOP is in power but I’m sure he wouldn’t apply if the Dems were in power is just mind boggling. I’m sure Chuck is a nice gentleman…but honestly.

  4. debbie0040 says:

    This was sent to the Deal campaign last week. He still has not signed it. We emailed it to the Barnes campaign today. Wonder if he will sign it? We also sent it to Monds and Carol Porter.

    Representatives from 45 tea parties across Georgia helped create this platform for candidates for Governor, Lt. Governor and members of the legislature to sign. Atlanta Tea Party and Georgia Tea Party Patriots spearheaded this project. Candidates from all parties will be encouraged to support this platform. We will list those that candidates that support this platform in an online voter’s guide and the press will be notified of candidates that support this platform. If you are a candidate that would like to sign on to support this platform, please email: Bertha Craig Allen at [email protected] or Mary Adamski at [email protected] .

    If you are not a candidate, please contact candidates and ask them to sign on to this platform.

    Tea Party Platform 2010

    State contracts cannot be awarded to the Governor, Lt. Governor, Legislators or their immediate families. This includes as contractors or sub contractors.

    Immediate families of the Governor, Lt. Governor, and Legislators are banned from serving as lobbyists. Employees of the Governor and Lt. Governor are prohibited from serving as lobbyists for at least one year after leaving their positions.

    No lobbyist funded travel is allowed.

    Any amount lobbyists spend on Legislators must be reported within five business days.

    We agree to advocate for property tax and State income tax reform.

    Full publication online of all committee votes.

    Legislators will pledge to override Gov. Perdue’s veto of the Zero Based Budgeting Bill and the Sunset Bill.

    We support a Constitutional Amendment to limit spending based on inflation and population like the Tabor Act Taxpayers Bill of Rights. Any excess taxpayer funds will have a percentage go to Rainy Day Fund, a percentage to pay off the debt and a percentage going back to the taxpayer, based on a sliding rate.

    All public high schools in the State of Georgia will be required to offer an academic elective on the U.S. Constitution and our founding documents for which State funded colleges and universities will be required to offer college level history credit . Private colleges will be able to opt in to providing credit.

    Due to the current unconstitutional and out of control behavior of our Federal Government, the citizens of Georgia expect our Governor, Attorney General, and our legislators to come together and interpose on behalf of our state and our citizens in order to stop any future unconstitutional mandates of the Federal government and also to begin reversing any previous unconstitutional mandates that should be disallowed under our federalist system of government in conjunction with the Tenth Amendment to our Constitution

    • B Balz says:

      My guess – nobody will sign it. Not that some, most, of the points are not valid and worthy.

      Pledges, as some pols have found, have a long acting, butt-biting quality to them. They may come back, after years of dormancy, and stomp ya.

    • John Konop says:

      I agree with above other than the below questions. I think we cannot not just put our head in the sand and not deal with the entitlement problem. And just ending it with no real plan I do not think would work,

      We are only 4 % reserved on billions of dollar we owe on healthcare benefits for state workers when they retire are you call for us not to honor this?

      …..We support a Constitutional Amendment to limit spending based on inflation and population like the Tabor Act Taxpayers Bill of Rights. Any excess taxpayer funds will have a percentage go to Rainy Day Fund, a percentage to pay off the debt and a percentage going back to the taxpayer, based on a sliding rate……

      Are you calling for an end to Medicare and Social Security?

      …..Due to the current unconstitutional and out of control behavior of our Federal Government, the citizens of Georgia expect our Governor, Attorney General, and our legislators to come together and interpose on behalf of our state and our citizens in order to stop any future unconstitutional mandates of the Federal government and also to begin reversing any previous unconstitutional mandates that should be disallowed under our federalist system of government in conjunction with the Tenth Amendment to our Constitution…….

  5. B Balz says:

    Should Georgia fight the new healthcare law? Mr. Michael, who makes his living in the health insurance and advocacy fields, has his take on it:

    http://us.mg203.mail.yahoo.com/dc/launch?.partner=sbc&.gx=1&.rand=76jj712penua7

    Another view comes from Georgians for a Healthy Future: Save the date, 12/7/2008

    http://us.mg203.mail.yahoo.com/dc/launch?.partner=sbc&.gx=1&.rand=76jj712penua7

    Healthcare affects EACH of us, regardless of our pol views. Dramatic changes in medical delivery are occurring NOW, and healthcare will be much different when YOU need it most. So PAY attention, elections have consequences.

  6. Three Jack says:

    while i’m thinking about it….thanks a lot ga gop for putting me in the position of actually thinking about voting for dems this year. in 30 years of voting, i have never even considered casting a single vote for a representative of the party that gave us almost all the entitlement programs bankrupting this country now. but through sheer incompetence you folks have put forth a slate of candidates that only a warden could be proud of…damn you ga gop!

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