47 comments

  1. Doug Grammer says:

    No, it’s titled correctly. John Konop hates NCLB. The question is: does he hate Com. Oxendine more? What will he do if Com. Oxendine is the GOP nominee?

  2. John Konop says:

    In all seriousness this is a major strategic error that could take the education issue away from Barnes. This issue is toxic with teachers and soccer moms.

    • Chris says:

      You realize this was one of his 2002 election commercials, right?

      Or course most of us already knew it was a bad idea to get the Feds more involved in Education, but crypto-liberals like Bush and those who blindly supported him because of the R after his name didn’t speak up.

      • MSBassSinger says:

        I do remember some conservatives objecting to NCLB when it happened. It was a clear indicator, when Bush gave Ted Kennedy carte blanche to write that bill, that Bush 43 was a Rockefeller Republican’t and not a conservative.

        Look back at what conservatives objected, at the time, to Bush’s big government, “religion of peace” appeasement, nation-building actions, and you’ll see real conservatives, not the faux conservatives of the Rockefeller Republican’t/Hannity/O’Reilly/Heritage Foundation pretenders.

        BTW, I liked the phrase “crypto-liberal”.

  3. John Konop says:

    I do not hate John Oxendine, in fact we have always been very friendly the few times we met. I just do not think he can win via the issues surrounding his campaign. I also think Karen Handel would make a better governor because of her no non-sense management style. In tough times you need someone willing and able to make tough calls.

    I have never questioned John on his intelligence like some. In fact I think he is a sharp guy who does understand issues well. I am not sure via his pandering what he would do to fix the problems we are facing in our state. Unlike Karen who is very direct about what she would do.

    On a personal level John likes good wine and is smart guy to talk about issues. John and his wife would be welcomed in my home for food and wine anytime. 🙂

    • ReaganRepublican says:

      Handel, please John. Desire for truth is what separates good sock puppets from bad sock puppets. Bad sock puppets are quite content to believe in fairy tales and lies, but good sock puppets usually need more, the truth. Handel is continually lying, and you are trying to help her spread lies. Can we believe anything you or she says anymore? Her resume is embellished(full of lies), she is not qualified to understand and correct Georgia’s problems and you know it.
      Handel=Habitual Liar
      https://docs.google.com/fileview?id=0B_KEK8-LWmzhODE4N2IzOGQtOWFhYi00NmJkLWFkZTMtOWI0ZDgzZmMzY2I2&hl=en

      • John Konop says:

        ReaganRepublican,

        The tone of your comment is why I will probably never get into politics again and stay in business. I am pragmatist who attempts to solve issues and looks for the best in people. Professional hit people like you may help a campaign but it definitely hurts our country.

        Is it really worth it?

          • B Balz says:

            I agree BC. The tail end of the Bell Curve do not wag the dog. Pragmatic, moderate, folks are not usually newsworthy because they do not speak in sound bites or proffer sensationalism.

            This Thursday, the US will publicly announce it is ‘broke’. The problems Georgia will face, if the $300MM in Medicare funds is not approved by Congress, will be profound. Our 2010 budget depends on Federal funds and will be short $300MM. My bet is Congress may not approve the dough.

            G20 projects worldwide austerity to replace debt. And yet, here at home some yap incessantly about whether or not a candidate disavowed their support of gays.

            In 2011-12 we are looking at projected budget shortfalls of $1B. But pawns would prefer to discuss sensational pap .

            WAKE UP! The game is changing faster than the players can adapt. When people find out how broke we are, and what that will mean to them, there will be serious and unpleasant outcomes. Think Greece.

            We should be delighted anyone would run for Governor given the few financial facts I have presented.

            “Forgive them Lord, they know not what they do.”

            • Tyler says:

              It’s small business owners like John Konop that drive this country. Investors in our nation and businessmen take a pragmatic approach because they are concerned with their family, well-being, and the capital they have accumulated through hard work and many hours. I’m with Konop and B Balz on this one. Having a level head and a listening ear isn’t always popular in politics, but I like to take the road less traveled anyway.

                • SFrazier says:

                  Americans want politicians that will be honest to them. They are sick and tired of both Democrats and Republicans lying to them. John, this was your chance, you are choosing to stand with lies. As for a future opportunity for you all I have to say is “you are blowing it John, you are blowing it”.

            • Tireless says:

              Given that coming train wreck, can Georgia afford to elect a Governor with zero experience in balancing the budget? We have these career politicians (Oxy, Handel and Deal) that don’t know squat about the budget, the departments, the players and the programs that need to be considered in order to make the most effective budget cuts in the state’s history. The aforementioned blow hards talk about what they would do since they can’t talk about what they have done to earn the job as Governor. If any of these empty suits win the nomination, we are going to be toast……assuming Barnes doesn’t beat them in the general election.

              • Lady Thinker says:

                We can’t afford Johnson’s accounting methods. I mean, how much money would he lose in the state budget?

            • bowersville says:

              John,

              I was a teenager in the ’60s and there was no digital technology. We had 331/3 rpm and 45 rpm plastic records that we played on phonographs or listened to music on am radios.

              It was inevitable that interference from high tension electrical wires would cause so much static that the music could no longer be listened to. The records would become scratched and the needle would hang up and become repetitive.

              Over and over, the records repeated themselves. The static on the am radio became unbearable. Both became irritable to the degree that the solution was simple. We turned the radio off and quit listening, but the old phonogragh or juke box had the best solution.

              Kick it and make the music move on along and play right.

              There are some that have become like that old juke box with the scratched record and the am radio with static…we read the same thing over and over and the message has become covered with static and become more irritable than productive.

              It’s harder to kick that old juke box through the screen these days and the juke box doesn’t know any better and just plays away, scratch and all.

    • Chris says:

      Oxendine likes good wine that those seeking to curry his favor pay for. Otherwise he is cheap.

      • Jace Walden says:

        Was? I’d say he still is a very popular fella, particularly amongst the self-proclaimed “conservatives” who paved the way for our current big government nightmare by spending us into recession and placing a “compassionate conservative” label on the top.

    • B Balz says:

      Tying his campaign to NCLB helps the GOP with intellectually honest GOP voters who won’t buy into Roy’s nuttiness. With the Dems, who knows how they feel about NCLB? And Johsua has a good point.

      Isn’t it odd the leading Dem gubernatorial candidate endorses a failed policy promoted by a GOP President?

  4. SFrazier says:

    NCLB is so not an issue right now. Stop trying to make it one to divert attention from the integrity of your candidate.

  5. True Grit says:

    What the heck are you talking about? NCLB is most certainly an issue and will continue to be so long as it’s in our public school system.

Comments are closed.