Disclosures? Michael Thurmond Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Disclosures

At least not for the last two years. So says Atlanta Press Club award winner Jim Walls:

Gubernatorial candidate Eric Johnson neglected to report $289,000 in state payments to his architectural firm from 1999 to 2002, the Associated Press reports. But Labor Commissioner Michael Thurmond can go him one better: He hasn’t disclosed anything whatsoever since 2007.

Thurmond, who’s running for the U.S. Senate, filed no financial disclosure forms with the State Ethics Commission in 2008 or 2009, a check of the commission’s online look-up shows. Elected officials in Georgia are required to report on basic details of their personal finances every year by July 1.

Since he’s leaving his state job, Thurmond is not required to file the form this year. A similar disclosure for the Senate campaign is due Tuesday.

H/T Jim Galloway

6 comments

  1. Ambernappe says:

    What is this this other than another layer of the new paradigm of :
    “I don’t have to if I don’t want to”. As many Americans call for enforcement of laws on the books, current officials just flatly disregard them. Can you say ANARCHY ?

    America is a land of law, and there are checks and balances. Sometimes it behooves the average citizen (no, not the ones demanding a right to be supported by taxpaying citizens), but hardworking, taxpaying voters, to call a halt to the demands of office seekers who do not wish to reveal a “paper trail” of their road to higher office.

    Mr. Thurmond, take your job hunt elsewhere!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. hannah says:

    What “basic details”? If a public servant receives no remuneration or income, except that paid by his employers (a public record), what’s to report?
    Also, what’s the penalty for failing to file a report?
    Given the AP’s penchant for sequestering its work product, their reporter making an issue about a public servant not making information readily available for them to inspect seems a bit over-the-top.
    Has the Labor Commissioner been doing the job he was hired and paid to do?
    News gatherers focusing on the private affairs of public officials is just another example of a preference for gossip-mongering, rather than reviewing and reporting on the official’s performance in office.

    • Doug Grammer says:

      “News gatherers focusing on the private affairs of public officials is just another example of a preference for gossip-mongering, rather than reviewing and reporting on the official’s performance in office.” …….or their ability to follow the law.

    • rugby says:

      So much low hanging fruit…

      “What “basic details”? If a public servant receives no remuneration or income, except that paid by his employers (a public record), what’s to report?”

      Because said servant can then invest in companies or other organizations he or she has to regulate thus creating a conflict of interest. Plus even if he or she has nothing to hide, public servants need to prove it.

      “Given the AP’s penchant for sequestering its work product, their reporter making an issue about a public servant not making information readily available for them to inspect seems a bit over-the-top.”

      This is incredibly stupid. AP’s work can be read on Google News, or any of the thousands of news outlets that carry the wire. It isn’t meant to be a news source anyone can pick up and read (like a newspaper). It is so news agencies can pool together resources, hence the “sequestering”.

      “News gatherers focusing on the private affairs of public officials is just another example of a preference for gossip-mongering, rather than reviewing and reporting on the official’s performance in office.”

      Right, there is no need to say,see what Sonny Perdue’s land transactions are right? I mean those are all private affairs. Or if there are suggestions that a public servant might be doing something criminal in his or her private life, no need to investigate that.

  3. jenny says:

    Don’t pay attention to the absolute facts we have on Eric Johnson, who is a Bible believing Republican when we can harp on Michael, whom for all we know has nothing to report.

    And really, at the end of the day, no one should criticize anyone for corruption, because everyone is essentially corrupt. You just point to the more corrupt political neighbor when the spot light lands on you, and you’ll be fine. No worries, Eric. Though, I think that you could take some pointers from Michael on public speaking. His speeches are quite good and his humble beginnings make for excellent tear jerking anecdotes on fatherhood, family and poverty.

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