Podcast with Karen Handel, candidate for Governor

March 29, 2010 7:55 am

by Jason · 15 comments

On Friday, I sat down with Karen Handel, former Secretary of State and Fulton County Commission Chairwoman, at her campaign headquarters in Alpharetta for the latest in my series of podcasts with candidates running in Georgia this year.

Among the several topics we discussed were the budget, options for dealing with ObamaCare at the state level, her ethics proposal and transportation.

You can download the podcast here (over 27 minutes/25MB, right click, “Save File As” to download).

In the next podcast, I’ll be chatting with Chuck Donovan, a Libertarian running for United States Senate.

If you have a candidate, no matter what party, that you would like for me to interview or questions that you would like for me to ask an upcoming guest, please drop me a line on Facebook or send an e-mail.

NorthGAGOP March 29, 2010 at 2:18 pm

Handel is sounding and looking better everyday.

Bill_k March 29, 2010 at 9:00 pm

Handel was the one that kept flogging the voter ID laws even though the courts kept striking them down. Her waste of government time and resources in support of Jim Crow laws means I will be passing over her name come election day.

Daniel N. Adams March 30, 2010 at 10:22 am

I’ve been waiting for someone to ask an obvious follow-up question. Since I am both Chairman of the GA LP and John Monds campaign manager, I was really hoping that someone else would. So, in order to get the question out there before this thread gets buried, I’ll try my best to set those “hats” aside and pose it as merely a concerned Georgia voter.

When asked about taxes, Candidate Handel said that she was against raising them. However, when asked about transportation, she said that there was a great need for increased funding and if it wasn’t done this year, it would have to be done next year (which would be done under our next Governor). Giving her the benefit of the doubt, the funding examples she gave were in the realm of streamlining and earmarking the current revenue generators and getting rid of some waste. But my concern is that most voters view “increase in transportation funding” as meaning “raising taxes”, either state wide or by local option. So my question is; Does she support raising taxes in order to increase funding for transportation, even though she said she was against tax increases?

I sincerely hope this is seen as a fair question.

Icarus March 30, 2010 at 10:31 am

It’s a fair question.

Currently, a penny of the statewide motor fuel tax is diverted to the general fund. This should be transitioned back to the transportation fund where it belongs. That’s extra funding without a tax increase, and I believe I have heard Handel speak of this, as well as others, at least once.

It’s also a solution that Libertarians should be able to support, as motor fuel taxes are about as close as we can get to “user fees” for roads, without setting up toll booths every 5 miles.

ByteMe March 30, 2010 at 10:41 am

I’d rather see it transitioned to mass transit, since the only way out of this mess is going to be to invest in moving people between the inner cities (note the plural) and ‘burbs without more money for car-based transportation.

But that’s a pipe dream given the current lack of leadership in our state government when it comes to transportation issues.

Daniel N. Adams March 30, 2010 at 11:45 am

ByteMe, it’s funny how when people like you say “leadership” I see dictatorship.

Some of us enjoy driving and don’t want to ride buses or trains… let those that do, pay for it.

Now if you can get my “pipe dream” of commuter roller coasters and flying cars some traction, then we can deal.

Why is it that the socialist right wants to ban/regulate all of life’s pleasures and the socialist left want to ban/regulate all the pleasures of living? I really wish all of you that want to make people do what you want would go somewhere else and bother each other and leave us tolerant Liberty loving Americans alone. We can take care of ourselves and our own.

ByteMe March 30, 2010 at 12:21 pm

Dude, when you start paying for the roads you use, let us know.

Why is it that the anarchist thinks they live without anyone else’s aid and that they pay for EXACTLY what they consume of the commons?

Daniel N. Adams March 30, 2010 at 1:54 pm

Pinko Commie!

your turn… ;-)

ByteMe March 30, 2010 at 9:56 pm

Excellent response! +2

Republican Lady March 30, 2010 at 10:39 pm

Daniel,

Where do you and your organization stand on social contracts?

AubieTurtle March 30, 2010 at 11:23 pm

Two words: teleportation beam!

One private industry perfects that, we can get government out of the transportation business altogether. Next time DragonCon is in town, we need to get some of those Trekkies on this issue!

Republican Lady March 30, 2010 at 11:47 pm

Haaaaaa. Love it.

AubieTurtle March 30, 2010 at 11:20 pm

Does it really matter? Roads get all kinds of money from sources other than taxes on gasoline. Shifting the penny of sales tax on fuel that goes into the general fund won’t matter if an equal amount of money that would be used for roads from other sources is cut.

If we really want to go the user fee route and don’t want to track everyone, change the state constitution to say that fuel taxes can only go to road and bridges AND no other taxes can go to fund roads. No SPLOST, no property tax (which is what pays for the vast majority of local roads), no diversions from the general fund, and no regional transportation tax. Also make sure that associated costs like police (traffic law enforcement), HERO, emergency services, DOT salaries, Georgia Navigator, etc. are all paid for out of the fuel tax income. Then we’re really getting somewhere and can set the tax on fuel to an appropriate level for the cost of roads. Until then, I’m not going to cry over a penny of sales tax on fuel going to the general fund when much more tax money from other sources is used to replace it.

One interesting thing to come out of the Scott/GA400 thread was the post about Gina Evans saying that the toll was needed to fund the salaries of SRTA. The tollway authority does much for the state’s transportation needs outside of GA400 but it is the users of GA400 who are subsidizing the rest of the state for that service. Like just about everything to do with transportation in this state (and to be fair, most every state), the money goes in all kinds of loops between collection and being spent.

Republican Lady March 30, 2010 at 11:54 pm

I remember when the toll road was built, the selling point for voters was that the toll portion would come down once it paid for itself. Do you remember that? Or were you here when it was built?

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