Interesting rumor of the day

One of the more interesting rumors I’ve heard from the capitol this year is that leaders may be considering cutting the session short, perhaps at 33 days or so, leaving time to come back later on and address budget issues that may arise for FY 2011. This was an idea floated last year as well. Of course, last year wasn’t an election year.

Such a move would not cost the state additional money, however, it would push those last days of session past qualifying, which begins on April 26th and lasts until April 30th.

Most members of the state legislature aren’t concerned about general election opposition since only a handful of districts are truly considered to be competitive. Some members of the Republican caucus are worried about potiential primary challengers, specifically opposition that may arise from the tea party movement, if they decide to cast a vote for tax hike.

Once again, this is just a rumor and it likely isn’t the only thing being consider, but still worth sharing.

45 comments

  1. Progressive Dem says:

    “Most members of the state legislature aren’t concerned about general election opposition since only a handful of districts are truly considered to be competitive.”

    And just why aren’t many of the districts competitive? Because they choose their voters when they reapportion. The legislature has no business establishing their own districts. I am well aware that Democrats perfected this perversion. Let’s get a better system to establish legislative districts, and that includes county commission and city council seats that the General Assembly also sets. Democracy requires competition.

    • macho says:

      Because Roy Barnes took district drawing to such unprecedented levels of unfairness and discrimination, 95% of Georgia’s legislative districts were drawn by a Federal judge who didn’t live in the southeast. They are probably the cleanest, least gerrymandered districts in the history of the State of Georgia.

      The reason most of the legislators aren’t worried about Democratic opposition, is GA is one of the reddest states in the Union.

        • macho says:

          We’ll he didn’t get the name King Roy for being a shrinking violet. I think it’s fairly common knowledge that the multimember and district packing schemes were pushed through by Barnes.

          If we follow your logic, the Governor is responsible for nothing when it comes to legislative initiatives.

          • ByteMe says:

            The last eight years are a perfect example of a Governor being responsible for absolutely nothing. 🙂

              • ByteMe says:

                That’s it? One car plant obtained via a semi-trailer filled with tax credits? Eight years and that’s it???

                And that’s not even a legislative initiative, which was the criteria in the original statement.

      • Progressive Dem says:

        “GA is one of the reddest states in the Union.” And yet Saxby Chambliss was in a runoff and Roy Barnes has a reasonable chance of winning the governors race.

        “…Georgia’s legislative districts were drawn by a Federal judge who didn’t live in the southeast. They are probably the cleanest, least gerrymandered districts in the history of the State…” Pulleeze, have you seen the 13th Congressional District? What a joke.

        Legislative districts should be derived from communities of common interest, not for racial or political quotas. A logical starting place for forming districts would be the Metropolitan Statistical Areas. In the current congressional districting, the metropolitan areas of Savannah, Columbus, Augusta, Valdosta and Macon are divided into 10 districts. In metro Atlanta, the 13th district encompassing slivers of 6 metro counties is a pathetic joke.

        Cobb County the 3rd or 4th largest county in the state is divided into three congressional districts. Henry and Fayette and portions of Douglas counties are in the same district as portions of Muscogee, Harris and Troup. This system is only logical to an elected official.

        If you look at the Ga. Senat and and State Rep maps, they aren’t too bad in the rural areas and stick fairly well to county boundaries. There are notable exceptions in the Senate: Clarke County gets cut in half to diminish Athens and the 18th messes with every district it touches taking pieces of 5 counties. http://georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu/pdf/2006senate.pdf. In metro Atlanta the house and senate districts are ridiculous. Rockdale has 4 house seats. It shares every one of them with DeKalb, Newton and Rockdale county. There are dozens of examples of long narrow districts that stretch across city and county lines instead of being compact centers.
        http://georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu/pdf/2006housemetro.pdf

        • macho says:

          I was quite clear in my comment in referring to GA Legislative Districts, not Congressional districts. I’ll admit, the Athens district was political gerrymandering, but 95% of GA legislative districts are the cleanest the State of GA has seen in since county representation. They were drawn by a Federal Judge incorporating all the factors you just mentioned.

          “In metro Atlanta, the 13th district encompassing slivers of 6 metro counties is a pathetic joke.”

          Thank the Democrat demagoguing of the need for Section 5 of the VRA for that one. You can hardly blame the GOP for drawing David Scott a ridiculous district.

          I stand by my comment that GA is one of the reddest states in the Union. The fact Saxby was in a runoff speaks to the lowest ebb for the national GOP since Watergate and Saxby’s poor strategy.

              • macho says:

                The multi-post districts were bad, and I feel they were a significant factor in Roy’s demise. There was no consideration given for the communities of representation, everything was looked at, 100% from the perspective of retaining Dem power, and perhaps what Hutmann always writes about, appeasing the dwindling rural Democrat legislators.

                But what did Roy in from a legal standpoint, was the egregious GOP district packing scheme. Every GOP district just so happened to be packed all the way up to the allowable +/- margin and every Democrat had the least population allowed under the +/- margin. The margin was from a pre-supercomputer era. When every district was nailed down to one or two voters, it became clear the error margin was no longer serving its intended purpose, but was used to discriminate against certain classes of voters, by giving them underrepresentation in the Legislature. He got nailed on Equal Protection.

          • Progressive Dem says:

            I was quite clear that the legislative districts in metro Atlanta are gerrymandered. And I’ve already slammed the Democrats for their role.

            This thread began with this statement: “Most members of the state legislature aren’t concerned about general election opposition since only a handful of districts are truly considered to be competitive. ” Don’t the citizens of Georgia want compettive elections? Do we want to just elect the same old people without any discussion of the issues?

            Look at the condition of this state. Are we satisfied with the leadership that has us near the bottom in infant mortality, teen birth rate, life expectancy, education, unemployment, food stamp participation, incarceration rates and childhood obesity. Is that the hallmark of a red state? Over 19% of Georgians live below the poverty level and we are 25th in median hh income. Another fine distinction. So we are one of the reddist states. Congratulations.

  2. Tiberius says:

    Every year there are rumors about scheduling and the budget. I always tell people not to listen to them. As with previous years, the only ones who know what is really going on are Jack Hill and Ben Harbin.

  3. polisavvy says:

    Well, that would truly blow a big one especially since my candidate is not a quitter and would not be allowed to raise any money nor devote 24 hours a day to his campaign until session officially ends. I certainly hope it’s just a rumor; however, considering who the Governor is supporting, I won’t be surprised.

          • polisavvy says:

            It is not published. My comment above is not based on rumor; but, instead, is based on what I have been told by a very reliable source who works very closely with the Governor. I feel pretty confident that they know what they are talking about. If only I had a way to communicate with you beyond here — I would do so. I really would.

            • Republican Lady says:

              It is just a habit. My long term career dealt in facts only, when I went back for my third and fourth degrees, the professors insisted on facts only, especially in my master’s, and as a college teacher, I make my students separate facts from opinions.

              Sometimes, I find myself saying “facts only” before I realize I have said it, but like I was taught and teach, I make students realize that not all opinions are facts. Many of them have a hard time separating the two.

              Make sense?

    • macho says:

      Even if the Gov. is “supporting” Handel, what good is it if he doesn’t tell anybody or do anything for her; other than getting his vote in the polling booth of course.

  4. LoyaltyIsMyHonor says:

    I have two observations:

    1. The whole, lets recess on day 30 something then come back in June to hammer out the budget is a rumor that’s been around for 20 years — every time we’re in a budget shortfall.

    2. A lot of legislators I’ve spoken to feel more vulnerable now than ever before. Why do you think nothing is getting done? Go to some committee meetings sometime. Notice how many bills pass out of committee versus how many were on the agenda. They’re so scared to do anything, because they may make a misstep.

    • polisavvy says:

      Yeah, what’s up with that? It appears to me as though there is less being accomplished this year than in previous years. Am I wrong in that observation, Loyalty?

      • Dave Bearse says:

        Pray tell, please enlighten us with examples of the accomplishments of the past half dozen years.

    • Dave Bearse says:

      If reconstituting Milton County, a divisive proposal without a chance in h311 of passing, exemplifies the legislative priorities of the new leadership, I’m glad nothing’s passing out of committee.

      • B Balz says:

        Exemplifies the ability to make lemonade out of lemons.

        Speaker Pro Tem Jones is rightfully using her new position to further a cause her Constituents feel is just and long overdue.

        • Dave Bearse says:

          It’s divisive and perhaps time-consuming legislation that is best described as pandering to constituents because there’s no chance for enactment.

          That’s fine. Lots of politicians do so—Just so long as she and the rest of the leadership aren’t complaining at the end of the session that divisiveness and insufficient time prevented properly addressing more pressing priorities.

          • B Balz says:

            Only time consuming or divisive if you do not buy into the

            City = GOOD
            Big County = BAD

            argument.

            This ‘movement’ is backed by some of Ga’s most influential ‘old guard’. Frankly, their arguments are making a lot of sense. It took me a number of years to come to this conclusion.

            It is less of a pandering issue and more of an end to a carefully constructed Kubicki play.

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