Water Contingency Task Force Reports To The Governor

Press release from Governor Perdue. The full report can be viewed here.

“We believe in a three part strategy – conserve, capture and control,” said John Brock, chairman and CEO of Coca-Cola Enterprises and co-chair of the Water Contingency Task Force. “There’s no single magic solution. We must conserve more water, capture the water we do receive, and control our water supplies through progressive water policies.”

On a separate track, Governor Perdue is pursuing a legal appeal, congressional action and negotiations with Florida and Alabama. But the job of the Water Contingency Task Force was to consider options if the judge’s ruling stands.

The final report reaffirms the gap cannot be closed between the water we have and the water we need by 2012 under the reduced withdrawals called for in the judge’s ruling. As Governor Perdue has said repeatedly, using Lake Lanier for water supply is our most cost-effective and environmentally friendly option. The thorough analysis of the different options, likely worth more than $2 million, was provided at no cost by The Boston Consulting Group and a team of expert engineering and consulting firms.

The task force found that if given additional time past the 2012 deadline, more options become available. These additional contingency options can be implemented by 2015 and 2020. Emergency solutions are extremely costly, but having a few more years gives more and better choices should the judge’s ruling stand.

The task force found metro Atlanta alone would take a $26 billion annual hit to its economy if no action is taken to address the judge’s ruling, causing a devastating ripple effect throughout Georgia and the Southeast.

“Our work is not over,” said Tim Lowe of Lowe Engineers and co-chair of the Water Contingency Task Force. “In fact, now an even more critical chapter begins. As the Georgia General Assembly convenes in January, we will continue to work with the Governor and elected officials as our recommendations are considered.”

21 comments

  1. ready2rumble says:

    We can thank Nathan “we cant get anything done in 3 years in congress” Deal for this mess. If he was looking out for the best interests of his district he would have worked to get legislation enacted so that the judge couldn’t rule that the lake is not legally a drinking water source.

  2. ByteMe says:

    The task force found metro Atlanta alone would take a $26 billion annual hit to its economy if no action is taken to address the judge’s ruling

    Wow, that’ll decimate the nude dancing industry here in Atlanta.

    And we know the legislators won’t allow that to happen.

  3. aquaman says:

    “The thorough analysis of the different options, likely worth more than $2 million, was provided at no cost by The Boston Consulting Group and a team of expert engineering and consulting firms.”

    What a sham. Anyone even remotely knowledgeable in water issues knew everything the Task force “learned” through this so called analysis.

  4. Game Fan says:

    “We believe in a three part strategy – conserve, capture and control,” said John Brock, chairman and CEO of Coca-Cola Enterprises and co-chair of the Water Contingency Task Force.

    WOW!!!
    Looks like we don’t even need public/private partnerships any more since one guy can do it all nowadays. Oh yeah. One corporate executive can represent the stockholders, his golden parachute AND the interests of all Georgians. Absolutely amazing. Good thing they got there with the “capture and control” before Pepsi I guess.

  5. fishtail says:

    Hate to admit it, but Roy Barnes left total funding in place for 7 reservoirs to provide for Georgia’s water needs….guess who killed it? Sonny “I hate Roy Barnes” Perdue. Sonny was so obsessed with killing any projects with Barnes’ name attached that he threw the baby out with the dish water on this one. We continue to pay a price and I worry that the voters next November will still remember their “buyer’s remorse” with Perdue?

  6. Game Fan says:

    Speaking of “water” and Coca Cola, things ain’t going so well in India. I mean, if there were actually any muckraking journalists in Georgia they might have their hands full with this stuff. But I suppose since circulation is down with newspapers it’s all up to the “new electronic media”. HAHAHAHAHHAAAAAAA!!!! How ’bout maybe the papers are all “owned” and “kinnected” and therefore BORING!!! Anyway, as an advocate of PLAIN VANILLA GOVERNMENT, well, there’s plenty here. You got “water” and Coke and some judge and a Boston consulting group, the water contingency task force, and some mysterious “team of expert engineering and consulting firms”. Then you have a deadline and an emergency. C’mon folks.

    • Life and Liberty says:

      The World Bank is championing this movement- putting a price on water and treating it as a commodity in hopes that users will “respect the availability” of water and “not take it for granted.”
      Instead, multinational corporations, needing water to operate their factories, are buying up these water rights, then selling whatever water they do not need to those who can afford to be connected to these water supplies.
      Its a terrible situation and it is closer to Atlanta than you think:
      In Detroit, Michigan, their Mayor last year appointed Victor Mercado, a private water industry tycoon, head of the city’s troubled water works. While the system continues to run down, the city has reduced its repair workload, instead focusing its resources on disconnecting delinquent customers. They disconnected over 40,000 customers last year, and had proposed to double that number this year. Now that number will surely adjust upward in light of new economic stresses on Government and citizens.
      Potentially, going into next year, that city will wake up to find nearly 200,000 households without water coupled with little or no positive action toward a rapidly failing infrastructure.
      Running the system down, starving it of capital: these are the kinds of measures we usually see in the corporate world before a “hostile takeover”.
      Once a system is too far gone, the citizens will accept any alternative, and government will be happy to get the “hot potato” out of their hands at any cost.

      Essential viewing:
      “Flow”

      • Life and Liberty says:

        BTW: I don’t think all private- public partnerships are bad. Such a pooling of resources may be the only way out of the mess we’re in.

        But this is not the answer, because it keeps the property owners out of the equation. Individuals need a stake in this. They need to, in the end, own their own water.

        • Game Fan says:

          Some view “water” as a common resource which belongs to “the commons” a.k.a. “the people” which is the best Western Civilization can probably do. Of course there’s still philosophical questions raised by the Aboriginal folk. But still in many cases “the government” is the best alternative for protection of resources as well as basic infrastructure.

          • Life and Liberty says:

            I say any resource that is on or contained in my property or on my person is mine to do what I please, so long as I harm none.
            Aboriginals might have a problem with that as well (property) but, here’s what happens when private industry and the uS government go at it without letting individuals come to the table…
            Since its enactment, the Clean Water Act of 1972 has led to significant and continued improvement in the quality of the nation’s waters. The law sounds good- everyone wants clean water, right? By in large, it has been a successful piece of legislation. Among other things, it has lead to stronger silt control legislation for construction sites and has made factories clean up their waste before it is put back into the water cycle.
            The current law does rightly limit government authority over folks private property, and, as always, some government agencies have made attempts to overstep these boundaries. The uS Supreme Court has made at least 2 decisions that Federal Agencies exceeded the authority granted them by this act. Rather than accept the High Court’s decisions in these cases, our Congress has decided to change the language of these laws.
            here’s the revision (last year’s congress)
            http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s111-787
            It redefines uS waters, once related only to navigability, to include EVERY DROP of water contained on or in the confines of the uS. Your dirt will not be your own neither will your pipes in your house, or (perhaps) even your body, so long as they contain water!
            (full article)
            http://wedrill.blogspot.com/2009/01/using-water-to-take-land.html
            Personally, I’d side with your Aboriginal or the farmer up the road with his private well over this kind of tyranny. But that’s just because I have a PP username to live up to…

  7. Dave Bearse says:

    “Press release from Governor Perdue….

    “We believe in a three part strategy – conserve, capture and control…”

    Thought I was reading the GOP playbook for a second….

Comments are closed.