40 comments

  1. Elin is Hot says:

    “But it raised an issue that was easily understood by anybody watching TV news: How much hand-holding should there be between lawmakers and those lobbying for special interests?

    Erick Erickson’s position, apparently, is that this stuff happens all the time and there’s nothing fishy about it. It’s a valid viewpoint; even members of the legislature have to make a living.”

    So why is Erick shocked when staffers supposedly “do” elected officials? Same concept.

        • Game Fan says:

          Funny how so many status quo types like to play the “tolerance” card when it comes to the relationships between lobbyists and politicians. And since we’re all advocates of free speech here, and since I’m not an insider I’m reserving my right to use my free speech to counteract the deleterious effect that the special interests have on the budget and the economy and free markets.

  2. Goldwater Conservative says:

    Hey, amateur journalism is another fire alarm in the world of American politics. There are too many things going on at any given time for a single person to be paying attention to everything.

    So long as it is journalism though. Advocacy and editorialism is not journalism (this is directed as those of you that are FoxNews viewers. FoxNews is not journalism. Neither is most of MSNBC.)

    • Ken in Eastman says:

      Advocacy and editorialism is not journalism (this is directed as those of you that are FoxNews viewers. FoxNews is not journalism. Neither is most of MSNBC.)

      Neither is the vast portion of progressive pablum printed in the New York Times and the Washington Post.

      Of course the greatest amount of censorship occurs when an editor decides what is not news and your choices of news sources do not consider the errors, lies, ethical lapses and misadventures of liberals to be newsworthy.

        • Goldwater Conservative says:

          When all is said and told, CNN is the closest to the median voter of all the cable news networks.

          The major networks are all very close as well.

          For the record, I have never heard the Post referred to as liberal. It is one of the most conservative dailies in America. The NYT is on the left a little, though.

          Political bias will not get out of the media anytime soon. When the news became a profit seeking scheme, honesty left the business (this was circa 1993).

          • Mad Dog says:

            Good post.

            I wish all the leaning was left to the editorial pages. (bad unintentional pun)

            I understand some things being written for certain demographics. The WSJ being one.

            Most video based news is very time consuming. Like having my Mom read the news to me. I’d rather get more details and faster via some print media.

            But very well done, Gold.

          • Ken in Eastman says:

            When all is said and told, CNN is the closest to the median voter of all the cable news networks.

            And this is based on . . . ?

            Your media is a closed system of like-minded dolts. Who on there bucks the system?

            If you want to be self-delusional, that’s fine, but don’t expect others to believe it.

  3. Truthteller says:

    gotta love it when liberals lump in foxnews is lumped in with msnbc, as if both are equally credible. hahahaha!

    • Goldwater Conservative says:

      I have some truth for you, Glenn Beck and Bill O’Reilly are bigots. They prey on conservative paranoia to make money off of goldline.com by pretending the Obama administration is a mirror image of the Stalin regime.

      They really on people not being educated for the purposes of profit. Like coal mine owners in WV. They work to keep people too dumb to leave the coal mines so they can keep a cheap uneducated and unquestioning labor market. That is the very antithesis to democracy (see Dewey).

      • Ken in Eastman says:

        We’re not a democracy, we are a republic – and Dewey was a socialist.

        Dewey was also co-author of The Humanist Manifesto: http://www.americanhumanist.org/Who_We_Are/About_Humanism/Humanist_Manifesto_I

        Which, in part says:

        The humanists are firmly convinced that existing acquisitive and profit-motivated society has shown itself to be inadequate and that a radical change in methods, controls, and motives must be instituted. A socialized and cooperative economic order must be established to the end that the equitable distribution of the means of life be possible. The goal of humanism is a free and universal society in which people voluntarily and intelligently cooperate for the common good. Humanists demand a shared life in a shared world.

        Yeah, that’s the guy you want to quote about “democracy.”

      • Ken in Eastman says:

        Here’s another great John Dewey quote:

        ““You can’t make Socialists out of individualists — children who know how to think for themselves spoil the harmony of the collective society which is coming, where everyone is interdependent.”

  4. Ludwig Von Beachbum says:

    Amateur Journalist in my book have more credibility. They are not puppets of editors who are in the pockets of politicians and know where the best BBQ and chili dogs are .

  5. B Balz says:

    Interesting thread, on a favorite topic of mine. SpaceyG often commented on the trend of mainstream media (MSM) becoming obsolete, as far as readership is concerned, due to web 2.0 advances.

    The impact of enabling ‘everyman’ to comment in a forum that is read by lawmakers, others, is appreciated by political operatives (polyps) and naturally discounted by MSM. Individuals capable of making germane, intelligent, and logical civil comments can create a ‘buzz’ . I believe we witnessed such a buzz with the 2009 Whole House of Representatives Evisceration (WHORE)

    The WHORE ‘buzz’ is well documented; it is not the first time that a buzz goes beyond ‘the story has legs’ to real action. Conversely, critics point out since bloggers use nom de plumes, their veracity may be questionable and easily manipulated for political, other, gain.

    Well known and frequent contributor ‘griftdrift’ made an interesting observation that ‘polyps’ can and do massage blogger commentary to fit their own agendas. To wit:
    (http://griftdrift.blogspot.com/2009/12/into-ethical-woods-final-word.html).

    And, ‘griftdrift’ questions if this very forum has anything to brag about: http://griftdrift.blogspot.com/2009/12/evolution-of-how-they-see-us.html.

    Amateur ‘journalists’ display some of the following characteristics, feel free to add your own:

    Pros:

    Not beholden to an organization which probably has an agenda,
    May have prima fascia knowledge of events,
    Writing style is uncensored, gives neat perspective,

    Cons:

    No disclosure required if that person has an agenda,
    No fact check required,
    Individuals can editorialize, plagiarize, or just lie, without recourse,
    Anonymity promotes belligerence, or worse, slander, without recourse.

    • Goldwater Conservative says:

      If PeachPundit is considered amateur journalism, which I believe it should be, the two big things (a pro and a con).

      First, a pro, the breadth of coverage. There are several things that I find here as well as on other weblogs and amateur journalist website that do not make it into the mainstream news. Where else are you going to hear about local campaigns and state politics? the AJC sucks (Galloway’s blog is really good but still narrow in that only he is posting topics) and there are not very many decent local papers.

      Here on PP there seem to be atleast a dozen contributors posting on events as they happen. Mainstream media does not have the time for that.

      The con that comes to mind is bias. Much of this builds upon what BBalz stated in his cons. Call me an elitist (I am), but there are far too many people that come here without the mental tools required to engage in civilized discourse. They are narrow minded and largely undemocratic. I am all about freedom of speech, but it is my opinion that journalism starts failing when it becomes a mere opportunity for an individual to get on their soapbox.

      Building upon that, a good 90%+ of the contributors topics are presented in a highly biased manner. The “Porter Responds” and the Jenny Hodges articles were excellent. To the point, no b/s. The “And on the seventeenth day of the twelfth month, Jerry Keen found himself all alone” was garbage. Even the topic paragraph for this thread is borderline non-journalistic. The rubuttal from Doug Richards should never have been qualified as being “good.” I understand, doing so promotes the purpose of PP, but even little things like that are a matter of individual interpretation.

      • Icarus says:

        I’ll speak only for myself, but I consider most of what I write here to be opinion, and not news. As such, I present with bias. It’s up to the readers to determine if they agree or disagree. The comments are here for that reason.

        • GOPGeorgia says:

          I sort of fall in line with Icarus’ philosophy, but I am also inclined to call Bull when I see it. If I see an unfair or blatantly false argument presented, I freely wander in and will call it as I see it.

          • B Balz says:

            GOP GA, we don’t always agree, but you provide valid and interesting ‘troop on the ground’ commentary. This writer advocates under the Dome and uses a nom de plume for that reason.

  6. B Balz says:

    ” … Call me an elitist (I am), but there are far too many people that come here without the mental tools required to engage in civilized discourse … ”

    A M E N ! ! !

    Yet, even someone with a rusty saw, a beat-up old hammer, and a 6′ tape measure, can build a decent doghouse if they choose to use the few tools they have. One doesn’t need a Pulitzer to be heartfelt and correct in their writing. That is what makes this medium so powerful and perhaps, dangerous, to some.

    • Mad Dog says:

      B Balz,

      Let’s think of it as learning to use the rusty saw, a well worn hand me down hammer, and a folding ruler.

      Power tools will always need electricity. Hand tools … not so much.

          • Goldwater Conservative says:

            Darn, I just looked and electricity isn’t in the Koran, the Torah, the I Ching, the Tao te Ching, it is in no sutra nor is it in any other religious text I have on my bookshelf.

            I guess god didn’t know about electricity (or America) when these books were written.

            Funny, how god’s knowledge is entirely dependent upon man’s knowledge. Makes you wonder if god was just made up.

          • B Balz says:

            I dunno GC, there is a lot of talk of ‘fire from the sky’ and being this close to Christmas, I’d watch it. (;>)

          • Goldwater Conservative says:

            I guess you may be right B Balz.

            Although, I am not certain whether that fire in the sky is Zeus preparing a lightning bolt or if it is just the glow of a torch carrying lynch mob heading my way.

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