Live Blog Tonight 7:30 PM re: Security Challenges for America and Israel.

Tonight I’ll be at the Greenfield Hebrew Adabemy to live blog a panel discussion entitled: “Radical Islam and Rogue Regimes: Security Challenges for America and Israel.” The panel will be moderated by Michael Medved and feature Douglas Feith, Michael Ledeen and Clifford May. You can learn more about the event here. Also, listen to my interview with Michael Medved from October 9th here.

I hope you’ll join me for the live blog, it should be an interesting discussion.

21 comments

  1. ByteMe says:

    A “discussion” with all discredited neo-cons on the panel? How enlighting could that be? Waste of time.

  2. South Fulton Guy says:

    Intellectuals engage in debate and make their case, while those devoid of any objective discourse or substance to support their position, childishly call people names…

      • South Fulton Guy says:

        So what is your position on the issue or should I assume from your handle that you are not an intellectual either.

        • ByteMe says:

          My “position” is that Feith, Ledeen and May should never again be put in a position of affecting or directing foreign policy in this country. They screwed it up royally the last time they had the chance but they still think they did the “right thing”, which indicates no ability to adjust course when new facts are in play. They should be ignored or derided at all times.

          As for Israel and “Radical Islam”, I still think we continue to not do the hard work in this country. We haven’t “drained the swamp” by affecting the Middle East money-from-oil supply. We want to win? Set oil taxes so that a barrel of imported oil costs $130/barrel, which will raise gas to about $4/gallon and immediately reduce our consumption of oil and gas products while raising money that could be put to use paying down our foreign debt (and strengthening the dollar again), funding transportation alternatives and so on.

          But the “no taxes, no way” crowd will have a cow even if they agree with the upside to the affect of the tax. So we continue to fund the radicals with our own bad habits.

          • B Balz says:

            S P E E D B U M P S

            Did you ever notice that there is always a group of folks that want to punish speed limit abiding drivers by installing speedbumps?

            I feel the same logic applies to adding a massive energy tax, $4 p/gallon PLUS the ill-advised, cap and trade legislation slogging forward as a solution to any durn thing.

            We will punish ourselves into be the least economically efficient producer on Earth. That will solve the problem, since we will no longer lead anything anywhere….

            “Punish America – Because we deserve it.” I doubt that.

          • ByteMe says:

            Didja ever notice there are a bunch of people who will keep paying money to terrorists and terrorist funders just because the alternative might possibly cause us discomfort?

          • B Balz says:

            I am not saying that a massive paradigm shift is long overdue with regard to US energy policy. Encouraging alternative energy usage through tax credits is one thing, but placing draconian gas taxes on everyone and every industry is a poor plan.

            There is a middle ground, byte.

          • ByteMe says:

            We had the same price for gas a couple of summers ago and we survived and adapted in a huge hurry. No dead people, no zombies walking the streets. Not so draconian, it turns out. Transportation energy costs are only a few percent of our total monthly expenses (well, except for the idiots who commute into Atlanta every day from Braselton), and it gave a strong signal to the alt-energy market that they were in play again.

            If not now, then when? Where’s the middle ground you claim exists that will send a strong market signal to get us out of the market for terrorist-funding?

  3. USA1 says:

    Did Mr. Ledeen have any good insights or hot tips?

    His regurgitation of the scoop on Obama’s college thesis was great! Too bad it wasn’t true, but at least Limbaugh milked it for all it was worth…and that’s what really counts–truth be damned!

  4. B Balz says:

    1.) Raise fleet mileage standards by offering incentives for vehicles that achieve 100 mpg status. Detroit will announce a production 230 mpg vehicle next year, so this is not far fetched.

    2.) I think some of the ideas that T. Boone Pickens suggests regarding changing how we ship by truck are meritorious.

    3.) Rail travel for passenger service must be re-invented. AMTRAK is so costly, people fly. I would use a rail to Florida, Savannah, instead of driving.

    4.) Military fuel use must be reduced through better management, this is just starting to happen. The military and the gov’t are huge users that can change a few hbits and save a lot of fuel.

    5.) We cannot conserve our way out of the consumption equation, other Countries will use what we conserve. We need to innovate ourselves away from the issue of funding other countries wealth.

  5. B Balz says:

    1.) Raise fleet mileage standards by offering incentives for vehicles that achieve 100 mpg status. Detroit will announce a production 230 mpg vehicle next year, so this is not far fetched.

    Paid for by the consumer when they buy the vehicle, right?

    2.) I think some of the ideas that T. Boone Pickens suggests regarding changing how we ship by truck are meritorious.

    The reductions in fuel use would pay for themselves, no?

    3.) Rail travel for passenger service must be re-invented. AMTRAK is so costly, people fly. I would use a rail to Florida, Savannah, instead of driving.

    Start by using existing track, re-scheduling freight to accommodate passenger rail service.

    4.) Military fuel use must be reduced through better management, this is just starting to happen. The military and the gov’t are huge users that can change a few hbits and save a lot of fuel.

    Smaller changes like ‘no idling’ are ‘free’, most of what I am speaking about are small, yet cumulatively significant changes that are revenue neutral.

    • ByteMe says:

      1) In general, fleet sales are not profitable. They’re more a form of marketing than anything else.

      2) Possibly, but where does the up-front money come to fund this? That’s like saying “Change all your windows to double-pane and the reduction in energy costs will pay for itself (in about 10 years if you keep your house that long).

      3) Existing track not owned by AmTrack or the Feds. It’s owned by railroad companies that want indemnification for anything that happens on their tracks — even without normal maintenance — in exchange for use of their tracks. It’s NOT free and turns out to cost billions to get use of those tracks.

      4) I’m sure the fuel burns the flyboys like to do are definitely a waste, but you can only get so much from the military without asking the rest of us to do our part. But this goes back to: why not ask the consumer to do their share FIRST?

      At least you’re thinking about the problem and proposing concrete steps. That’s more than most people.

  6. B Balz says:

    Civil discourse is the first step, byte. That’s one reason why your posts here are well received, you present and don’t screech. Plus, you can spell…

  7. John Konop says:

    We have real finical issues here in America we do not need to go off on another NATION BUILDING project!

    Former U.S. Comptroller General David Walker Says Medicare Program Endangers Financial Stability

    “I would argue that the most serious threat to the United States is not someone hiding in a cave in Afghanistan or Pakistan but our own fiscal irresponsibility,” Walker tells Kroft.
    (CBS) Beginning next year, and for 20 years thereafter, 78 million Americans will become pensioners and medical dependents of the U.S. taxpayer.

    “The first baby boomer will reach 62 and be eligible for early retirement of Social Security January 1, 2008. They’ll be eligible for Medicare just three years later. And when those boomers start retiring in mass, then that will be a tsunami of spending that could swamp our ship of state if we don’t get serious,” Walker explains.
    To illustrate their impact, he uses a power point presentation to show what would happen in 30 years if the U.S. maintains its current course and fulfills all of the promises politicians have made to the public on things like Social Security and Medicare.
    What would happen in 2040 if nothing changes?

    “If nothing changes, the federal government’s not gonna be able to do much more than pay interest on the mounting debt and some entitlement benefits. It won’t have money left for anything else – national defense, homeland security, education, you name it,” Walker warns.

    Walker says you could eliminate all waste and fraud and the entire Pentagon budget and the long-range financial problem still wouldn’t go away, in what’s shaping up as an actuarial nightmare.
    Part of the problem, Walker acknowledges, is that there won’t be enough wage earners to support the benefits of the baby boomers. “But the real problem, Steve, is health care costs. Our health care problem is much more significant than Social Security,” he says.

    Asked what he means by that, Walker tells Kroft, “By that I mean that the Medicare problem is five times greater than the Social Security problem.”

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/03/01/60minutes/main2528226_page2.shtml?tag=contentMain;contentBody

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