Georgia’s newest laws now in effect

They all go into effect July 1. That includes this one:

Starting today, Georgia becomes the first state in the nation to have a law allowing adoption of an embryo.

The Option of Adoption Act was introduced by state Rep. James Mills, R-Chestnut Mountain, and is viewed as a victory for anti-abortion groups who want the law to recognize embryos in their earliest stages of development as people. It is among the most notable of more than a dozen state laws taking effect today.

The law’s language does not specifically define an embryo as a person, but Mills said there’s no mistaking the implication.

“I don’t know of anyone adopting chairs or desks or tables — you can only adopt living human beings,” Mills said.

40 comments

  1. Mike says:

    People can adopt puppies and new styles of dress, perhaps they can adopt chairs.

    Interesting thing to see is when 20 year olds start going into bars wanting a drink claiming they were conceived 21 years ago, and 17 year olds voting. Tweens driving.

    • ByteMe says:

      I adopted my desk chair 20 years ago.

      I think it’s time for a divorce, but have no idea how you undo an adoption.

      I do like the paradox of claiming that you’re older than you really are because of when your mother’s egg got fertilized and you became a “person”.

  2. iheartmaps says:

    silly Mills — there’s also the Adopt a Roadway/Highway program. talk about adopting an inanimate object…

  3. Gray says:

    Does this mean that expectant mothers can take out life insurance on their fetuses?
    Does this mean a pregnant woman drinking a glass of wine is contributing to the delinquency of a minor?
    Will a miscarriage be investigated as a homicide?
    Will a pregnant mother be charged for two people when eating at a buffet?
    Is an expectant mother entitled to child support? How about additional welfare benefits?
    If an expectant mother becomes widowed, does she get social security benefits for both herself and the embryo?
    Does a pregnant woman pay two fares when flying on a plane?
    Can a landlord kick a pregnant woman out of her apartment for having one-too-many people?
    Can a dad sue a mom for “wrongful death” after a miscarriage?

    • GOPGeorgia says:

      Yes, if they can find an insurance writer to carry them.

      Probably not, unless she does it to try to harm the minor, such as taking too many sleeping pills.

      No more so than death by natural causes.

      Nope.

      Not until the baby is born.

      Nope, but if she is extremley large, I think I remember overweight people being charged for two seats.

      Nope.

      Nope, unless she harms the fetus deliberately.

      These answers are just my gut reaction and not based upon law. But then again, does the law always use “common sence?”

      • Bill Simon says:

        Doug,

        I don’t think you’ve thought this through. The pro-life “personhood at conception” crowd is going to have their minion DAs (district attorneys) positioned to be able to open a case at their personal whim (like the DA in North Carolina and the DA in Douglas County 2 years ago) on ANY miscarriage they so choose.

        What you think is commonsense answers isn’t going to be in the world of personhood-at-conception if that crap ever gets passed.

        And, people cannot figure out why Georgia remains in the bottom 10% of this country in education. Look at what comes out of our legislature as a means of figuring out that the majority of the electorate just isn’t up there too high in IQ-Land.

        • GOPGeorgia says:

          My answers were my gut reactions, meaning I purposely did not think them through. I just wanted to give the first thoughts that came to my head. We aren’t writing law or policy. We are just stating opinions for fun’s sake, but some people take things way too seriously.

          A better question would have been, if a woman is pregnant, does she get counted twice in the census? Even hard core pro-lifers that think life starts at conception should have fun with that one.

          • Kellie says:

            What if a woman is pregnant but needs to get an abortion for health reason but someone takes her to court wanting to adopt that fetus in order to prevent the abortion? The judge then orders the woman to carry the baby to full term putting the woman’s life at risk. Does that make since? Don’t think it won’t be tried.

          • Jeff says:

            Kellie,

            Wouldn’t the mother first have to agree to the adoption for the lawsuit to even be possible?

            After all, you can’t just FORCE someone to let you adopt their kid, and that is essentially what this is.

          • Kellie says:

            My point is, if a woman does not want the baby but someone else does, how long before people start pushing for forced adoptions. The “mother” would be giving up her right when she decides to abort but someone else would be stepping in as a guardian to the fetus and future parent.

          • Jeff says:

            To me, a non-biological parent forcing someone NOT to get an abortion is just as evil as forcing them to GET one. In other words, I fully support BOTH of the babies’ parents ‘ right to decide what happens to the baby, not just the mother, but anyone other than the two parents in question should stay the HADES out of that decision.

          • Joshua Morris says:

            “if a woman is pregnant, does she get counted twice in the census?”

            Since the baby will be part of the population until the next census, why not count him or her?

    • Jeremy Jones says:

      Does this mean that expectant mothers can take out life insurance on their fetuses?

      I could not find a company writing it, nor could I find a law prohibiting such. Since life insurance is dependent upon age, and since law defines age as time since birth, probably not.

      Does this mean a pregnant woman drinking a glass of wine is contributing to the delinquency of a minor?

      Yes, though not guilty of the specific law you quote, a woman can be charged other crimes if her actions, such as smoking or drinking, are proven to have harmed the child. The level of proof would be so great, I don’t see many criminal complaints being filed anytime soon.

      Will a miscarriage be investigated as a homicide?

      Some are, see my answer below concerning “wrongful death.”

      Will a pregnant mother be charged for two people when eating at a buffet?
      Completely up to the owner of the buffet, they don’t charge extra for fat people, nor do they give a discount for skinny people. Often, children under XX eat free, a pre-birth child would fall into that category.

      Is an expectant mother entitled to child support? How about additional welfare benefits?

      Yes and yes. If a divorce is made during pregnancy, child support is calculated assuming the birth of the child. If it is finalized before birth, the amount is not less because the child is not yet born. Pregnant mothers do get larger welfare benefits than do non-pregnant women.

      If an expectant mother becomes widowed, does she get social security benefits for both herself and the embryo?

      Yes, if the child was the child of the father that died.

      Does a pregnant woman pay two fares when flying on a plane?

      No, nor does a woman carrying an infant on her lap.

      Can a landlord kick a pregnant woman out of her apartment for having one-too-many people?

      Yes, he can begin the proceedings if the new addition will create a family too large for the property. (The actual eviction cannot be enforced until the day of birth)

      Can a dad sue a mom for “wrongful death” after a miscarriage?

      Yes. Also, a mother can be charged with homicide if her deliberate and calculated actions resulted in the death of the child prior to birth if it can be proven her intent was to kill him/her.

  4. I heard on the radio that we can finally eat inside MARTA stations now. What a relief.

    I’m also happy they made changes to the Boll Weevil Eradication Fund.

  5. Jeff says:

    Some of the changes were decent, some were negligble, but some were pretty dang bad.

    For example, HB 575 vastly expanded the definition of ‘kidnapping’ to where ANY movement of a person without their consent is now kidnapping.

    In other words, if a person stands in front of a train and you grab them off the track, you can be charged with kidnapping if they didn’t want to be moved.

    A couple of the bills increase paperwork, such as the new Sickle Cell law regarding marriages and the meningitis law that says schools now have to send even more paperwork home that 98% of people will never read, if it even makes it home to begin with.

    That said, I applaud the Epi-Pen law that now allows students to carry Epi-Pens on their persons at school in case of an allergic reaction. I also applaud the new law that allows victims of domestic violence to shield their addresses in voting records. There are a couple others, but those are the biggies to me.

    • Jeff says:

      yeah, back in April. Icarus pointed it out in a post here, but I don’t feel like digging through the archives to find it. It was buried way down in a press release about a completely unrelated topic – tax breaks for jet fuel or some such nonsense.

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