What if they can’t?

I understand the problem, but what if the state can’t find a permanent place for the kids?

A child advocacy group said Tuesday that the state has failed to live up to a court settlement in which the state agreed to find permanent homes for more children in foster care.

Children’s Rights Inc. asked a federal judge to find the state in contempt of the 2005 settlement. In the settlement, the state Division of Family and Children Services agreed to meet 31 benchmarks for the foster children in Fulton and DeKalb counties.

Children’s Rights said DFCS has had mixed results in meeting the benchmarks but repeatedly has failed to meet two of the critical requirements. Officials for the advocacy group said that negotiations with the agency have broken down on those issues.

4 comments

  1. bucky says:

    Good point, Erick. Butt this is motion is more about attorney fees and proving a point than it is about children. Even the court-appointed monitors praised the state for the progress it had made in getting these kids out of foster care. The report on which Children’s Rights bases its contempt request says as follows:

    “The Accountability Agents want to recognize the State’s current practice efforts to help the
    children in this cohort achieve permanency as quickly as possible and not simply “manage by
    the numbers.” By December 31, 2006, the State was expected to help “at least” 35 percent of the
    cohort or approximately 500 children achieve permanency. In fact, the State’s performance
    went beyond the minimum and helped about 700 children achieve permanency. Ironically, this strong performance in period two made the period three threshold harder to attain. In the
    second period, 199 children in excess of the number needed to meet the standard achieved
    permanency. That was a positive development for those children, but having exited care in the
    second period, they did not count toward the period three standard. The Accountability Agents believe that in considering the State’s performance on Outcomes 9 and 10, the cumulative accomplishments since the Consent Decree are meaningful in addition to the performance in an individual reporting period.
    . . . . The average age of the children is 13 compared to 8 for the remaining in the Outcome 8 cohort. In addition, many of the remaining children have been in custody well over 24 months, with the average length of stay being 7.4 years. The children’s age and their length of time in care present serious challenges to achieving the next outcome threshold for these children.”

    So, where’s the willfulness required to sustain contempt?

  2. eehrhart says:

    Bucky,

    You are so right on point and if people only knew.

    The attorney welfare program on this suit is up around 20 million dollars of state taxpayer money.

    13 million alone to the attorney’s in the settlement consent order. Hidden deep in a reserve account at DHR’s budget. An obscene amount!

    Remember this is a case that never even went to trial. 13 million- talk about a racket.

    A lions share of money to New York liberals to come here and tell us how to care for Georgia’s children. AND yes that will set some of you off I am sure. I can hear the comments already: “Well you need someone too”

    If even half this money was spent on those kids instead of high priced law firms then the kids would be better served.

    To continue a concept from another thread just last week….a little research on the firm which raked in the lions share of the tax dollars and how much they gave to the daughter of the FED judge who decided the case, and her campaign for a certain superior court seat during the pendency of this lawsuit would be instructive to say the least with respect to money and influence in the judiciary.
    And oh the irony this firm who spent all the campaign dollars is usually called on when they want a quote for Common Cause!!

    Too rich really. Pun intended

  3. Jane says:

    Nancy Schaefer for DFAC director. That show the corporate and Bueacrat interests that helped defeat her. Let her REFORM the department.

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