John McCain: In… $$$… Out…

John McCain’s visit to Atlanta to help prop up his campaign war chest was met with a small protest:

More than 50 protesters marched in front of the Marriott Marquis on Monday, shouting “Bush, McCain, same thing!”

The protesters were a melding of groups from organized labor, seniors and anti-war organizations. They competed for space and attention with about a dozen young McCain backers.

As the Republicans shouted “McCain!” the protesters added, “Shame!”

Jane Kidd and David Adelman were nearby to represent Georgia’s Democrats:

Across Peachtree Center Avenue, Georgia Democratic Party chairwoman Jane Kidd and state Sen. David Adelman (D-Atlanta) held a news conference to add a more official voice of protest.

Kidd blasted McCain for only coming to the state to raise money and not to meet with regular voters.

“Instead of listening to Georgians, John McCain chose to talk with people who have given him thousands of dollars,” she said.

Of course, as has been noted on this site before, John McCain received some donations thanks to a fund raising letter from not so golden boy Ralph Reed.

I’m sure we’ll see more of John McCain in Georgia as November grows nearer and Jim Wooten has to stop covering his ears and yelling “no no no” and confront the dreaded fact that indeed…  Georgia is in play.

51 comments

  1. odinseye2k says:

    Are you counting the record number of people that came to see him on Georgia Tech campus or in Cobb county?

    Or are folks on this blog buying into the “popularity is bad” meme?

  2. John Konop says:

    I think counting out Obama in Georgia would be a mistake. This is a strange election McCain and Obama are both moving toward the middle and this will open up votes for Barr.

    Win or loose McCain will have to spend money and resources in a traditional red state which could hurt him in battle ground places.

    Obama’s biggest problem is will traditional heartland working class Democrats vote for a black guy for President. The strange part is Democrats are pointing fingers at the GOP when the issue is internal.

  3. jsm says:

    “…shouting ‘Bush, McCain, same thing!'”

    Somehow, I imagine that sounded more like “same thaing!”

    “Obama’s biggest problem is will traditional heartland working class Democrats vote for a black guy for President.”

    That’s interesting, since he’s not a “black guy.” Actually, he’s best described legally as an Arab American.

  4. Chris says:

    Wow. JSM you are a retard.

    Obama is the product of an American, and a Kenyan. Kenya is in Africa. There are some Muslims in Kenya. However Arab is not a religious designation. It is an ethnicity.

    Of all the bad ideas coming from Senator Obama and his campaign, the fact that Republicans must stoop to such stupid tactics as slandering Obama with “he’s an Arab” or “he’s a Muslim” pisses me off to no end.

    JSM, please crawl back under the rock you came out of. Your help is not needed.

  5. jsm says:

    Comment monster got me again.

    I’ll just say this: Richard Cohen, of the Washington Post and Kenneth Lamb have written about this subject. You can get pissed off all you want about the truth, Chris, but you can’t change it. Obama has lied repeatedly to hide who he really is, and America deserves to know the truth about the man who is running to be their leader.

  6. odinseye2k says:

    Yes, I wonder where this braindead notion of Muslim as an insult came from. Reminds me of that line from the Siege where Danzel Washington is surrounded by Army guys.

    It’s something like:

    Army guy: “Careful, or I might just take you for an Ethiopian”

    Danzel: “You’re just dumb enough to believe that’s an insult.”

  7. jsm says:

    Nobody on this thread has said anything about the term “Muslim,” except Chris. Don’t read your own “issues” into what was actually said.

  8. odinseye2k says:

    “Obama has lied repeatedly to hide who he really is, and America deserves to know the truth about the man who is running to be their leader.”

    So, who really is he? Closet Marxist? Black Panther leader? Or just jet-setting buddy of OBL?

  9. ChuckEaton says:

    “Obama’s biggest problem is will traditional heartland working class Democrats vote for a black guy for President.”

    I’d say Obama’s biggest problem is his being the most anti-capitalism candidate for President since Gus Hall. Middle America, by and large, still believes in private property rights.

  10. odinseye2k says:

    “Middle America, by and large, still believes in private property rights.”

    Just those that you can make believe that still own anything. Populism was born and raised in Middle America. Corporations can’t own land in the Heartland:

    http://www.newrules.org/agri/southdak.html

    There’s a huge difference between being pro-business and pro-corporate rule.

    Of course, the Republican candidate believes that $5 million annual income is “middle class.”

  11. IndyInjun says:

    I agree with Farris.

    All the folks going into anti-Obama hysteria are FAR more frightening here than Obama himself.

    He is promising $900 billion in new spending, but the MONEY AIN’T THERE it will ALL go to a $5 trillion to $10 trillion bailout of all the too-big-to-fail entities, doubling the debt overnight.

    What all these nut-case far righters are doing is falling for the same Rovian tactics that divert attention from the massive destruction that GOP policies have wrought on everyone.

    Obama will be better off losing than winning and so will the Dems. There is NO money for their agenda.

    McCain will win and the GOP will be wiped out in a very JUST reaction to their destruction of the USA.

  12. Chris says:

    Indy,

    I think your wrong on about half your points and exaggerate the other half, but at least you argue issues that matter. Not what country someone’s great grandfather came from and whether or not you can call yourself an african-american.

  13. jsm says:

    “So, who really is he? Closet Marxist? Black Panther leader? Or just jet-setting buddy of OBL?”

    Do some reading, and maybe you’ll get some answers for yourself:

    “At the same time, several of his oft-recited stories may not have happened in the way he has recounted them. Some seem to make Obama look better in the retelling, others appear to exaggerate his outward struggles over issues of race, or simply skim over some of the most painful, private moments of his life.”

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/politics/chi-070325obama-youth-story,0,5069625.story?page=1

    “Let us hold aside that the book the Globe relied on in discovering these singular Obamaesque virtues, Dreams From My Father, contains composite characters and other fictionalized elements–not exactly a portrait of sterling honesty or authenticity.”

    http://www.tnr.com/politics/story.html?id=1f22d28c-ced2-4761-b350-77f3513928ac&k=52616

    Maybe he’s a product of his parent’s heartening after the Selma march. Oh, nevermind, he was born long before that.

    Maybe he’s a product of the Kennedys’ generosity in donating to the airlift that brought his father out of Kenya in 1959. Oh, nevermind, the Kennedys actually donated money in 1960 for a second airlift.

    And how about that candidate questionnaire in Illinois on which his aides supposedly “unintentionally mischaracterize[d]” his positions?

    Who is he, you ask? That’s a good question.

  14. John Konop says:

    ChuckEaton

    The point I am making is Democrats like Spacey had no issue with Hillary playing the race to win. I would bet they did a focus group and bet on the Bradley factor with Democrats not Republicans. X percentage of democrats like Spacey will tell friends they support Obama but in a private voting both not vote for him.

    (BRADLEY EFFECT)
    http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/la-oew-contreras5feb05,0,5145379.story

    Racist comments like JSM made only work if you are a racist. I could make a very logical argument as a conservative why I do not support McCain or Obama. Even if racist like JSM spews out hatred against Obama instead of issues that would only work on a Democrat that is a racist. And Obama’s possible problem is with core base Democrats that may not vote for a black man. And if the GOP was smart they would reach out to minority voters rather than alienate them with comments like JSM.

  15. ACConservative says:

    “Of course, the Republican candidate believes that $5 million annual income is “middle class.””

    I’m pretty sure that a majority of folks earning 5 million in annual income consider themselves to be middle class.

    An overwhelming majority of Americans consider themselves to be middle class. The reason is that we always compare ourselves to those above us.

    If you bring in 5 million dollars a year you think you’re middle class because you’re idea of rich may be the Hilton family.

    If you bring in 500,000 a year you think you’re middle class because you certainly aren’t making as much as that guy with 5 million dollars, but you also are making more than the guy working for minimum wage at the grocery store.

    My parents, who bring in about 6 million a year consider themselves middle class. In fact I don’t think I ever recall hearing them say that they were rich… I don’t even think I said I was rich growing up.

  16. ACConservative says:

    But here is the overall question, why should someone making 5 million annually have to shoulder the tax burden for the rest of the country?

    Because they worked hard to go to med school and become a doctor? Because they scrapped and saved to start up a business from scratch and are now realizing the fruits of their labor?

    Obama’s message of wealth distribution hearkens to Karl Marx more than any other presidential candidate not named Eugene V. Debs. The reason he doesn’t win over the “corporate” vote is because they see him as willing to take all the things that they’ve worked so hard for.

  17. odinseye2k says:

    And why should you reap the benefits of your parents’ hard work just because you won the lottery (and from a $6 million / year family, you won it big time)?

    But, that’s the great debate right there. How much do you owe to yourself versus the community?

    Libertarians get it very wrong on the individualist side, Communists get it wrong on the community side. The rest of us get to struggle.

    But hey, if McCain wants to defend the super-rich, that’s his choice. He has plenty of arguments to deploy. But he voids his right to call his a campaign for plain-ol’ folks.

    In fact, where I come from, he might almost be called an “elitist.”

  18. John Konop says:

    ACConservative

    FYI

    WIKI-The idea of a progressive tax has garnered support from economists and political scientists of many different ideologies – ranging from Adam Smith to Karl Marx, although there are differences of opinion about the optimal level of progressivity. Some economists[15] trace the origin of modern progressive taxation to Adam Smith, who wrote in The Wealth of Nations:

    The necessaries of life occasion the great expense of the poor. They find it difficult to get food, and the greater part of their little revenue is spent in getting it. The luxuries and vanities of life occasion the principal expense of the rich, and a magnificent house embellishes and sets off to the best advantage all the other luxuries and vanities which they possess. A tax upon house-rents, therefore, would in general fall heaviest upon the rich; and in this sort of inequality there would not, perhaps, be anything very unreasonable. It is not very unreasonable that the rich should contribute to the public expense, not only in proportion to their revenue, but something more than in that proportion.[16]

    In most western European countries and the United States, advocates of progressive taxation tend to be found among the majority of economists and social scientists who realize that completely proportional taxation is not even a possibility.[17][18][19] In the U.S., the vast majority of economists (81%) support progressive taxation.[17][18][19]

  19. jsm says:

    “Racist comments like JSM made only work if you are a racist. I could make a very logical argument as a conservative why I do not support McCain or Obama. Even if racist like JSM spews out hatred against Obama instead of issues that would only work on a Democrat that is a racist. And Obama’s possible problem is with core base Democrats that may not vote for a black man. And if the GOP was smart they would reach out to minority voters rather than alienate them with comments like JSM.”

    Excuse me? What exactly makes me a racist, Konop? Mentioning a guy’s documented lies? Stating the truth about his heritage? Since when is that racist? I’ve not said one negative thing about the guy’s ethnicity. My only issue is that he has misrepresented himself. I’ve debated the issues of this campaign numerous times on this board–not once mentioning anything negative about anyone’s ancestral makeup.

    Only a sorry sack of dog crap would make the unmerited accusation you made. No wonder you got your a$$ handed to you in 2006.

    This only demonstrates the problem we face in this Nation of running from the truth and throwing out emotional arguments with no basis in fact. That’s what liberals do, Konop.

  20. John Konop says:

    JSM

    If you cannot figure out how you crossed the line I feel sorry for you. This issue has nothing to do about liberals or conservative political views. My point is simple we have racist who are both liberal and conservative.

    If you need I could show you on issues basis my misgivings with positions Obama has taken.

  21. Icarus says:

    Peach,

    Remember a certain front page admonishment from a month or so ago?

    Some of us worked a bit hard to bring you back to have you disappear so soon.

  22. jsm says:

    Konop, you didn’t do well in reading comprehension, did you?

    Barak Obama has proven himself to be a pathological liar, and you’re focused on the fact that I mentioned his heritage, saying I crossed some imaginary line that you won’t define.

    You are the one who has crossed a line with an accusation you can’t back up.

  23. Bill Simon says:

    Icarus,

    You should point out to the little roach that odinseye2k / was asking what Obama was, and I was agreeing with him that Obama was a “Closet-Marxist” NOT that I’d be voting for Obama.

    Roaches…there are no good things one can say about roaches other than they and their idiotic friends should be stomped out of existence.

  24. GOPeach says:

    Icarus –

    The little tyke spins his stories like a top. What’s new? Then he has violent threatening language AGAIN!

    ” stomped out of existence” … anger issues.

  25. John Konop says:

    Jsm

    The truth is both McCain and Obama have flip flop on numerous issues Iraq, immigration, abortion, taxes, spending……..

    Unlike you I can provide youtube video links out of the mouth of McCain and Obama.

    If you are a real conservative why not deal with a real issues. Since you do not get the concept I will help you.

    Both candidates have presented tax plans with no spending cuts to cover it. Why do you think driving up more national debts which has driven the dollar in the toilet and drove inflation way up is good for the economy?

    Why do you support either candidate’s position on fixing the failed No Child Left Behind program instead of scraping the idea of equalizing test scores and unfunded mandates on local government?

    I have a few more but I am interested if you can answer the questions, especially without mentioning race or religion.

  26. Three Jack says:

    “This is a strange election McCain and Obama are both moving toward the middle and this will open up votes for Barr. “

    please explain how either obama or mccain are moving to the middle. did you watch the rick warren forum?

    bob barr? name one issue that he agrees with himself on.

  27. John Konop says:

    Three Jack

    FYI

    Obama, McCain: Meeting of Iraq minds?

    by Mark Silva

    It seems that Sens. Barack Obama and John McCain have now met in the middle on Iraq:

    Obama has long called for a withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq within 16 months after election, should he be elected president. McCain this week called that a “pretty good timetable,” and said U.S. forces should be “out of there” by the end of his first term, should he be elected.

    But McCain also has predicated any “horizon” for troop withdrawals on “conditions on the ground,” like President Bush. And Obama acknowledges, too, that , after his promised withdrawal of combat forces, the timetable for continuing support from residual U.S. troops in Iraq will be “conditions-based.” Obama even cited Bush in his remarks in an interview near the end of his vaunted European tour.

    http://www.swamppolitics.com/news/politics/blog/2008/07/obama_mccain_meeting_of_iraq_m.html

    FROM LATIMES

    Obama, McCain agree on many once-divisive issues

    Their similar stances on immigration, nuclear weapons, global warming and stem-cell research are evidence of a centrist shift in the political landscape.

    http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-na-centrists13-2008jul13,0,1800667.story

  28. SkylerA says:

    The Problem is that John McCain has yet to have a rally in Georgia, or any type of event that average voters can meet with him. Its always big dollar fundraisers.

    In reference to his San Francisco fundraiser, he held a rally and a town hall in the area before the fundraiser, and when Obama came to Georgia, he held a big fundraiser then held a public town hall.

    Chairwoman Kidd is precisely correct, McCain is only interested in Georgia money, and is taking our votes for granted, which is a tragic mistake.

    Why all the McCain yard signs?

    He has yet to put a staff in Georgia, are the yard signs all over the state an attempt to give the image McCain actually cares about Georgia?

    I think the pundits, and McCain are in for a big surprise in November if they continue this fatal strategy of ignoring Georgia and taking it for granted.

  29. IndyInjun says:

    LBJ’s mushroom cloud/daisy girl ad should be dusted off and used against the candidate most likely to get us all blown up – John McCain.

    Obama won’t do any damage, he won’t be able to pass anything with bailouts gobbling up all available funds in sight.

    McCain is old, mean and damn near insane. His recent hostility toward the Russians was instructive.

    Maybe voting for Barr isn’t so good an idea…..

  30. Three Jack says:

    konop, in your own words, please explain how mccain is moving to the middle when he has been in the middle for years as a senator. his rhetoric is more conservative now than ever.

    obama couldn’t move to the middle if he was sandwiched between pelosi and gingrich. he is the liberal’s liberal.

    who is mark silva?

  31. John Konop says:

    Three Jack

    The difference between us is I think action speaks louder than words. In one breath McCain said his has always been a 100% pro-life, yet his short list has three pro-choice candidates for VP and he has a record of being moderate on abortion.

    The floating of Lieberman, Ridge and Carly as VP is obviously a move to the middle. As far as tax and spending policy McCain refuses like Obama to guarantee a PAY GO style policy. This is the biggest pander of them all because any economist or controller will tell you both candidates cannot pay for what they are proposing. And as I said the No Child Left Behind style solution to education is another failed big government solution they both support. BIO-Fuels is another big government scam solution used to get rural voters that both candidates support. I could go on and on……

  32. Three Jack says:

    thanks konop for making my point. mccain has always been in the middle; how can you say he is moving there now? every example you cite are lifelong positions for the ‘maverick’.

    if you watched the warren thing saturday, you would have heard mccain use all the most conservative talking points normally espoused by dobson, robertson, et al. that is the contradiction here; mccain trying to move right away from his career in the mish-mash middle.

  33. Three Jack says:

    konop, so you are making the argument that mccain was a conservative until purportedly flipping on bio-fuel and paygo? are you serious?

  34. John Konop says:

    Three Jack

    You can spin it anyway you want the fact is both candidates are moving toward similar positions. And as I said McCain is pushing very moderate VP candidates.

  35. Three Jack says:

    konop, you have no idea who mccain is “pushing” for veep. he is certainly considering many including some who might be considered moderate based on one single issue – abortion.

    no spin konop, you are making the ridiculous argument that mccain was conservative all those years while working with feingold, kennedy, lieberman, et al and now is moving to the middle. that is one of the more laughable statements i have seen yet in this race.

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