Sex Offender William James Santos: Our Newest Victim

Oh, the humanity!

Georgia’s sex-offender registry law should be struck down as unconstitutional because it makes being homeless a crime, a lawyer told the state’s highest court on Monday. “The law is fundamentally unfair to homeless sex offenders,” public defender Adam Levin argued to the Georgia Supreme Court. Levin represents William James Santos, a who is charged in Hall County for failing to register a new address in the sex-offender registry. Because this would be his second failure-to-register offense, Santos faces a mandatory life sentence.

William James Santos is a sex offender. William James Santos has been convicted of same and any appeals, if even filed, did not change that. William James Santos did something quite bad that affected the lives of others in ways that, its reasonable to argue, scarred them for life.

Maybe William James Santos should have thought about all this before he decided to become a sex offender. Maybe if William James Santos hadn’t violated the law, he wouldn’t be in this situation.

We need to know where Georgia’s sex offenders reside and I have no sympathy for William James Santos. If he can’t find a place to live, the Georgia Department of Corrections can help him permanently.

12 comments

  1. Rogue109 says:

    Sorry, Rick, but it is not illegal to be homeless, unless you are criminally trespassing on the property of another. It’s illegal to be a registered sex offender and not register a residence.

    Maybe we could get the original offense overturned because William James Santos was “stupid” to have violated the law. You don’t want to make being “stupid” a crime, do you? (Boy, did I open myself up with that one (grin)!)

    Don’t cry me a river because this guy was kicked out of a shelter. He is not the victim here.

    Again, he is not the victim.

  2. Doug Deal says:

    Rogue,

    I am as “throw the book at wrongdoers” as they come, but I think the whole sexual offender registry thing is egregious.

    Either the person is dangerous, and needs to be in prison, or they or not and once they have paid their debt to society, they need to be able to lead as normal of a life as possible.

    Setting up a system where they can’t find work, can find a place to live, and can’t find privacy and peace from neighbors, is cruel, if they are indeed no longer a danger. Otherwise, what are they doing out on the street?

  3. Rogue109 says:

    Doug:

    I agree, it’s awfully hard to find a job and a stable place to live after you have violated the law and become a sex offender.

    They DO need to be in prison (or worse), but we can’t do that because our illustrious court system will find such punishment to be “cruel and unusual.” Look no further than Louisana and their recent SCOTUS experience!

    They shouldn’t be on the street. But once SCOGA finishes with this guy’s situation, expect more “inventive” court rulings in the vein of Genarlow Wilson with the result being that no one will know where William James Santos is or who he is near.

    He is not the victim here and I think making life as difficult as possible for him is just fine.

  4. Doug Deal says:

    Rogue, you do not need to be a victim to earn mercy. However, I know nothing about Santos or his crime, but in the general case, I would prefer more crack heads on the street than genuine sex offenders. But those that we release from prison deserve the chance to make some kind of life.

  5. Tinkerhell says:

    Given the recidivism rate of sex offenders I don’t think that very many of them should be out period. With that in mind we need also need to revamp what we define as a sex offense. Let some of the drug offenders out & keep the sexual offenders in…

  6. TOPDOLLAR says:

    When you say SEX OFFENDERS you talk about a lot of people and different crimes. I am a sex offender. Over ten years ago I tried to have sex with a 22 year old lady that I had taken out a few times. The crime happen over her house, while her brother was home. I was charged with attemped Rape 1st degree. I was convicted and I have been paid my debt to soceity. Still today I am unemployed and I need to find somewhere to live. Yet, I know if I had killed the girl and did my time in prison. When I get out I can live anywhere and work anywhere. Yet the victim is not longer living. Why is that?

  7. Doug Deal says:

    Tink,

    I am not against keeping the dangerous ones in jail, but if the state thinks that you are dangerous, and it let’s you out of prison early, the problem is with the state letting people out early.

    Anyone let out needs to be able to lead as normal of a life as possible. Supervision is fine with a parole or probation officer, but public shaming with these lists and the tacit approval it gives to disturbed wannabe vigilanties is a bad way to handle things.

    Again, if they are dangerous, keep them in prison for life, if they are not, let them not be lumped in with child molesters and serial rapists.

  8. Rogue109 says:

    but public shaming with these lists and the tacit approval it gives to disturbed wannabe vigilanties is a bad way to handle things.

    Which vigilantes in Georgia? And what have they done to who?

  9. Doug Deal says:

    Rogue,

    I am too lazy and frankly do not care enough to search for the stories, but I remember reading about some “sex offenders” who have had things like their name and picture hung from every telephone pole in teir neighborhood. Letters sent to their jobs in order to get them fired and even being beat up or vandalized by neighbors.

    If you want to claim that this does not happen, you would have to live on another planet.

    If the people are truly a danger, THEY SHOULD BE IN JAIL, if they are not dangerous, they are being abused by pathetic vigilantes. A number of people seem very willing to be riled up to do harm to strangers for things that they were never a part of in the first place. This is wrong.

    Gratuitously serving the interests of inflamed passions is incompatible with civilization.

  10. Taft Republican says:

    Why don’t we have a drug offenders registry? Then we’ll know where every single person that ever used drugs lives, and can post their pictures around the neighborhood when they move in! Won’t that be great?

    Come to think of it, why stop there? Why not have a drunk drivers registry? Then we’ll know where every single person that ever had a DUI lives, and can post their pictures around the neighborhood when they move in! Won’t that be great?

    I mean, that’s what these registries are for, right?

  11. Icarus says:

    “Why don’t we have a drug offenders registry? …Won’t that be great?”

    Well, at least it would narrow down the choices of who might be holdin’.

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