Scott McClellan – Media ‘Ho of The Year

What a coward Scott McClellan is. He should have stood up and been a man and taken a stance against the thieves and liars in the White House when he was there witnessing to it all, not during the window of most profit opportunity for his new book sales.

As one commenteer to Jay Bookmans’ column about McClellan’s tell-all says:

Maybe (Tony) Snow will be next. Listening to him in the past I have thought surely he can not be THAT obtuse to believe this line of BS. You watch, Snow and then blondie (Dana Perino) will “tell all” next. The cockroaches are starting to swarm away form the garbage dumb that is this Administration.

They’re all just cheap media whores. So far, Valerie Plame has taken the fall for all these White House employee clowns. I hope she is one day remembered as a martyr for the sins of the Cheney/Bush years, including the most cowardly of ‘em all, McClellan.

If I was McClellan’s momma, I’d disown him now. No, I take that back. First I’d slap him, then I’d disown him. Then tell everyone I knew not to buy his book, but rather just steal the damn thing. Because of course we all must read it now.

88 comments

  1. Don’t be too hard on him Spacey. Scott’s just trying to make a buck in this world. With Bush hating now our favorite national pastime he’ll make millions.

  2. SpaceyG says:

    Our arrogance and sense of entitlement to a standard of living few deserve has far exceeded our legitimate capacity to maintain it.

  3. Chris says:

    well, Bush hating has been the favorite past time of the left since November 2000. Its only now that we’re seeing the complete disaster he has been to the conservative cause that Republicans are joining in the Bush hating game.

    In fact, I predict very soon that many democrats will be happy with the way Bush/Cheney/Rove have gutted and destroyed the credibility of conservatism and the GOP.

  4. Chris says:

    Our arrogance and sense of entitlement to a standard of living few deserve has far exceeded our legitimate capacity to maintain it.

    Well that is an interesting statement. Question: what standard of living do we deserve? What standard of living can we maintain?

    I’m not trying to take a dig at you, but I think there may be a fundamental difference in perspectives that merits further inquiry. Email me offline if you prefer.

  5. IndyInjun says:

    Lessee…..his book was only the latest in a procession that began with Paul O’Neill’s.

    Ever heard “Where there is smoke….?”

    Bush apologists must be totally exhausted by now.

    They are the greatest band of contortionists and hoop-jumpers the world has ever seen.

    One problem – every conservative with a brain and an ounce of objectivity is now standing on the sidelines, just shaking their heads at the damage done and the obliviousness of the Bush robots to it all.

    We ain’t applaudin’.

    Those in the GOP who ARE paying attention are its incumbents in Congress, some of whom are standing in yellow puddles.

  6. Rogue109 says:

    Our arrogance and sense of entitlement to a standard of living few deserve has far exceeded our legitimate capacity to maintain it.

    With respect, I think we have every right to keep our standard of living and pray that one day other nations achieve our success.

  7. shrike071 says:

    I can only dream that the citizens of Georgia will be roused from their slumber and see that the state’s leadership is cut from the same mold as the clowns in Washington.

  8. DMZDave says:

    Not sure how much money Scott is getting for this book. What is 30 pieces of silver worth these days?

  9. dorian says:

    Why is it that people who complain about standards of living being too high never give theirs up? If it is such a noble endeavor, why not lead by example?

  10. SpaceyG says:

    Oh believe you me, the market will correct any misguided standard of living. I believe it’s in the process of doing that as we speak.

    Yes Chris, I must admit it’s a damn good line. If I see it used uncredited, I’ll call one of my many attys.

    And therein lies the beauty of blogging… you’re just never sure when the muse will strike, so you just need to write. Write something. Write anything.

    That said, being so pithy, it surely warrants a blown-out discussion. It’s a great roundtable topic. Hmmmm… maybe we should do a little He Said/She Said PP video thing?

    I can’t email anyone right now, although I can get email. My router just suddenly gave-up the ghost for no apparent rhyme nor reason. Technology. Feh.

  11. Chris says:

    Oh believe you me, the market will correct any misguided standard of living. I believe it’s in the process of doing that as we speak.

    That might take care of the our legitimate capacity to maintain it, but what about a standard of living few deserve.

    I posit that all people deserve the standard of living Americans enjoy. That is why I believe that (short of known criminals) anyone should be allowed to enter this country to find work to better themselves and their family’s future.

    A rising tide lifts all boats. The decadence of the American economy has lead to many advances in medicine and technology that are enjoyed by rich and poor a like. And like tides, the economy is cyclical. While things may be or look bleak at the moment, things will improve and mankind will continue its march forward.

  12. jsm says:

    “Our arrogance and sense of entitlement to a standard of living few deserve has far exceeded our legitimate capacity to maintain it.”

    Tell that to Al Gore, the Clintons, the Kennedys, Charlie Rangel, etc., etc.

  13. Bill Simon says:

    Spacey has a “router?”

    You know how many Internet users DON’T have a router? Plenty.

    I say we Google-Map Spacey’s house and broadcast to all the unfortunate souls out there (the ones who DON’T have the standard of living Spacey apparently does) where she lives so they can take her router away from her and give it someone more deserving of a “higher standard” of Internet connection.

  14. heroV says:

    “Our arrogance and sense of entitlement to a standard of living few deserve has far exceeded our legitimate capacity to maintain it.”

    This is complete nonsense.

  15. Bill Simon says:

    Wait, Hero…Spacey is whining AGAINST entitlements…maybe she’s turning “conservative” on us…

    (Heyyyyy…was that a wild boar that just flew by?…)

  16. Chris says:

    someone more deserving of a “higher standard” of Internet connection.

    A Nigerian 419 spammer maybe?

    (Sorry SpaceyG – it was a cheap shot but I had to take it)

  17. Progressive Dem says:

    “Don’t be too hard on him Spacey. Scott’s just trying to make a buck in this world.” “Our arrogance and sense of entitlement…”

    Umm, did it ocurr to you that he might be telling the truth? Or are you entirely too cynical to consider that possibillity?

    He is being savaged by the Bush and GOP apologists. Given his front row experience with Karl Rove, he undoubtedly forsaw these attacks, yet was still willing to call Bush on his arrogance and malfeasance. The man will have a tough time ever again working in politics, which is where his career has been.

    And if we are going to start calling out “cheap media whores”, I can think of a half-dozen talk show hosts, whose only ambition is to keep their ratings high and could give a fat rat’s ass about public policy, accuracy or balance. We can start with Lou Dobbs, Sean Hanity, Neal Boortz and Bill O’Reily; all of whom would say anything for a Nielson Rating and another moment in the spotlight. If these guys aren’t media whores, then Georgia isn’t the Peach State.

  18. waterboy says:

    I don’t think McClellan is a liar….no more than Obama or Clinton. He’s just wrong. You are only a liar if you know what you are saying is false. These morons actually believe what they say. Stupid…yes. Liar….I doubt it.

  19. Bill Simon says:

    Actually…I believe South Carlolina went so far as to decorate a water tower in the likeness of a peach to prove THEY are the “peach state.”

    What has Georgia got to show for their claim to be a state of peaches?

  20. Chris says:

    Bill – SC’s peach looks like a big Butt. Tifton has on along I75 that looks like a real peach.

    And the Congressman from the First CD is a Peach.
    And our license plates have peaches.

    And lets not get into Atlanta’s road naming scheme.

  21. John Konop says:

    I will remind most of you much of what Scott McClellan said and wrote is not new news. In fact Former Treasurer Sectary Paul O’Neal, numerous fired generals…..all had similar observations about the Bush administration.

  22. MediaGuyAtl says:

    The company that published the book is owned by none other that George Soros. Plus, Mac has signed a deal with NBC, to be paid for the first interviews. Follow the money.
    Scooter and Rove had a meeting, oh my! Did Mac attend that meeting? No. The aftermath of Katrina handled wrong? Hell yea! Let’s not forget the locals who screwed up along with the Feds. The book seems to rehash the old headlines. I look forward to checking it out at the library. At least we know who won’t be invited to the Republican Convention.
    We need to worry about more important things. Like electing a Senator, President. One who had spent only 147 days in the Senate before his campaign began, or one who thinks it’s okay to sneak into America and receive the same benefits as the taxpayers. The choice is ours, a second Jimmy Carter term or a third Bush term. Scary isn’t it?

  23. jsm says:

    “Umm, did it ocurr to you that he might be telling the truth?”

    No, but it did occur to me that his timing shows him to be a coward. If he’s telling the truth, he has demonstrated that he was too weak-kneed to stand for his principles when he was the President’s spokesman. Otherwise, he’s lying to make some money. We all know the bandwagon is well-populated and comfortable these days. Why not jump on and make a fortune at the same time?

  24. John Konop says:

    MediaGuyAtl

    YOU SAID

    …one who thinks it’s okay to sneak into America and receive the same benefits as the taxpayers….

    WAS THAT NOT THE MCCAIN IMMIGRATION BILL?

  25. John Konop says:

    sm

    What part is he lying about? As I said much of what Scott McClellan said and wrote is not new news. In fact Former Treasurer Sectary Paul O’Neal, numerous fired generals…..all had similar observations about the Bush administration.

  26. Romegaguy says:

    Just tell me if the Georgia Gang or your idol Towery says something about it Spacey

  27. jsm says:

    Konop,

    You missed the word “if.” News reports are saying McClellan called the war in Iraq “a grave mistake.” Either he was too weak to state this view when he worked for the White House, or he doesn’t really feel that way. I don’t know which, but neither demonstrates to me that he has any character.

    He also attacks Bush for not being bipartisan in his handling of the situation in the lead up to the attack. I’m glad Bush didn’t take advice from the flower children. I’d rather that he stand by his beliefs, which he did.

    McClellan says that, while in the White House, he was trying to be part of the “team” and give Bush “the benefit of the doubt.” Now his views have “evolved.” What a pile of BS.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=90931444

    You can decide for yourself if he’s a coward or a liar.

  28. John Konop says:

    jsm

    Do you think nation building is the best strategy for the Middle East and if so why?

    The crazy part is nation building is a liberal policy not conservative. And that was the policy many conservatives went after Carter and Clinton for.

    In fact that was a key issue Bush 2 went after Gore in a national debate.

    We have both parties making political points and not dealing with the truth.

  29. Progressive Dem says:

    “The timing shows him to be a coward.”

    First, the guy was deputy press secretary durring the run-up to the war. It is not his place to challenge the VP or Rumsfield on foreign affairs. god knows Bush admires a team player and he doesn’t suffer dissent. Now McClellan is not on the team, and is free to express his mind, which he is doing. You may not like his truth, but it is first-hand knowledge of how things worked.

    Second, when is the timing right for him to express his views? He didn’t write the book immediately after he got pushed out. Things could have gotten better for Bush by now. He didn’t know Bush’s disapproval ratings would rise to 77% when the book was published. If he waits until after the election, his views and opinions would no longer be relevant. Timing is not the problem; the problem is the truth he exposes.

    Finally, people should be careful charging him as a “liar”. The president chose this man as his prinicipal spokesman. Let’s hope the president wouldn’t choose a liar for this job, but would be seeking someone with some honesty and character.

  30. DMZDave says:

    Candler Park: You need to read some books. I seriously compared McClellan to Judas. The comparison is apt and one often used in literature as a judgment on the actions of the betrayer and the relationship he has betrayed. McClellan was given a rare privilege and he abused the trust and confidence of the man who elevated him and entrusted him with a high position in his inner circle. I never liked McClellan because he could not communicate well and I thought soldiers fighting in Iraq deserved someone who could tell their story. Now it turns out he is also a man without honor.

    After the applause from the Bush haters dies down, I suspect the full impact of what he has done will someday weigh heavy on his conscience. I doubt the Soros funded crowd who actually wrote and published this book even let poor dumb Scotty even read it.

  31. John Konop says:

    DMZDave

    Do you think nation building is the best strategy for the Middle East and if so why?

    The crazy part is nation building is a liberal policy not conservative. And that was the policy many conservatives went after Carter and Clinton for.

    In fact that was a key issue Bush 2 went after Gore in a national debate.

    We have both parties making political points and not dealing with the truth.

  32. IndyInjun says:

    The protestations of the Bush apologists now fall on dead ears.

    There has been a progession of good Republicans as long as my arm who have been scapegoated, fired, demoted, ostracized, and forced into resignation by this – the most totally corrupt administration in my lifetime, just for trying to do their jobs in service to America.

    It started with O’Neill and Lindsay, who dared speak the truth about the lunacy of Bush budgets and the ludicrous understatement of war costs. McClellan’s book reportedly deals with Bush’s intense, personal reaction to them.

    The effects on this PeachPunditeer have not been inconsequential. Frankly, the brain-dead, zombie-like, lock-step marching of the Bush apologists frightened me for a while even more than their godawful master.

    Was enabling this %#$^ worth destroying the country?

    I got a real gut full of stupid, overdone GOP partisan arrogance and denigration of REAL CONSERVATIVES who did not drink the Bush Kool Aid starting in the fall of 2002. You all probably have noticed.

    Bush apologists need not worry about Soros and the libs. We conservatives should be on your mind, for we intend to take your lamentable party down to a decimating defeat.

    Cheer THAT!

  33. Goldwater Conservative says:

    I have 6 words for everybody that thinks that McClellan is disgruntled: “He was there, you were not!” If he is making this stuff up, why has the White House not filed suit for libel? Because McClellan is not lying.

    This is not atypical. Even McClellan’s belief about how it happened is not unusual. The bubble and campaign politics bit. All president’s fall into the “I’m right, their wrong…let’s prove it” mentality over a couple of issues in their terms. It has been about 40 years since a war was started and a 100,000 people died because of it.

  34. waterboy says:

    As was stated earlier, McClellan may not be a liar…just wrong. He’s got an opinion about the war, so what? You know what they say about opinions….and McClellan is one!

  35. Bill Simon says:

    Goldwater,

    With a Demo-controlled Congress, one would think that with all this supposed evidence coming-out in tell-all books that there would be enough probable cause to initiate an impeachment inquiry, right?

  36. DMZDave says:

    John Konop: This is not about attacking or defending Bush. It is about honor, integrity and and yes, loyalty. People who write “tell-all” books that trash their bosses after leaving their employ clearly demonstrate by their actions that they lack integrity and honor. Every word they utter from the moment they sign a book deal forward should be suspect.

  37. Bill Simon says:

    DMZ,

    Still, if it is a fabrication, then, public figure or not, Bush would have a solid case for libel…because libel is still a tort that can be brought against someone if they are lying.

  38. IndyInjun says:

    The McClellan book by itself is NOTHING. What is really SOMETHING is how Bush apologists are willing to take America to collapse rather than believe what scores of good Republican’s have been telling them in these books!

    HELLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOoo……. just look at the constant procession of good Republicans that this administration is trashed!!!!!

    You mean they are all lying and Bush is the paragon of truth?

    I mean it’s not like these folks are Code Pink.

    Why are YOU jumping through hoops to defend him?

    If there ever has been a subversive 5th column in America, it has nothing on the Bush zombies.

  39. rugby fan says:

    DMZ: That argument would have merit if McClellan were the first person to say such things. He isn’t and frankly, while you may want to question the individual’s integrity, there is nothing to suggest what he is saying is wrong.

    Bill: Nancy Pelosi said impeachment is “off the table”. At this point it would be pointless to start impeachment trials due to time constraints.

  40. Chris says:

    It is about honor, integrity and and yes, loyalty.

    I agree. But what is more important? Honor or loyalty? How can you consider yourself an honorable person if you stay loyal to someone who lies, cheats and steals?

    I’m not making any statement wrt what may or may not be in his book. I’m just saying that if the Bush Administration did act in a manner that is dishonorable, then Scott McClellan was not dishonorable in being disloyal.

  41. Goldwater Conservative says:

    Impeachment will not come up…and I hope it does not. I really hope that congress waits until we get a new president so we do not have to worry about Bush pardoning anybody.

    Honestly, I value the opinion of McClellan much more than any of the pundits on this matter.

    In addition to that…I have a serious problem (as would most objective thinkers) with people that will not admit that mistakes may have been made…or even that we really should not have gone to war in Iraq. The CIA and other intelligence agencies have even said that Hussein was no longer in control of his government as of 1999. In top of that…it is clear that al-Qaida was not in Iraq until after we invaded. This is not “fight them over there, rather than here” argument. Al-Qaida does not possess the means to invade the U.S. They can still attack here the same way they did before, but wasting resources in Iraq does not make us safer here at home.

    Bush is right about one thing though…I am just not sure how well it will sit with him and his followers. “History will tell”, I just do not think that the 20% of America that would rather not admit to being lied to will actually believe the history books. They already do not believe anything coming from British or American or even UN intelligence gathering agencies/committees.

  42. IndyInjun says:

    “They already do not believe anything coming from British or American or even UN intelligence gathering agencies/committees.”

    Nor, evidently, their own eyes and ears.

    They are just as extreme as Code Pink and just as destructive.

  43. jsm says:

    “You may not like his truth, but it is first-hand knowledge of how things worked.”

    No one but the President and few others are privy to the complete intelligence gathered about and applied to this war on terrorism. Even McClellan’s knowledge of situations in the White House is incomplete. He was given the information that the administration wanted him to have and distribute. IMO, he should still give President Bush the benefit of the doubt.

    “Second, when is the timing right for him to express his views?”

    Immediately when he feels he cannot with a clear conscience carry the message he is asked to communicate.

    “Can not one of you defend Bush’s nation building strategy?”

    Konop, I don’t even like the premise of your question. I think it is necessary that we do what it takes to destroy those who plot and train to kill our people and our way of life. I obviously don’t agree with every decision made in the Oval Office, but I also don’t want the responsibility of making those decisions.

    In this world of political correctness, this Nation is trying to make friends with Arab peoples who have been brainwashed for generations to hate and kill Americans, all while trying to kill those who are organized, funded, etc., in this goal. The world “community” and American liberals do not recognize the impossibility of some to be reasoned with, and necessary compromise with the liberal establishment pushes us to do things that don’t make sense to try to appease those who really hate us.

    If we pulled out today, we would still be “building” the nation of Iraq with foreign aid for generations to come. We can either try to show them the benefits and joys of freedom, or walk away and allow terrorists to re-build the viper’s nest that will infiltrate and ravage our country. Peace requires the absence of an invading enemy. We had better do what we can to eradicate terrorist organizations where they incubate.

  44. Progressive Dem says:

    For those that want to bash McClellan as a liar, coward and ungrateful to his former boss, please consider Dick Morris.

    Faux News labels him as a former advisor to Pres. Clinton. Do you think they would consider hiring Scott McClellan? What label will they put under his picture?

  45. Goldwater Conservative says:

    Regardless of how complete the information that McClellan was provided…this book is an account of his observations. He admits this and openly states that he gave the president and his advisors the benefit of the doubt.

    Jsm, you act as if al-qaida has a fully functioning navy, air force, army and various special forces units. Ravage our country? This is non-sense fear mongering. Also, it is really hard to be a whistle blower in American politics. Sure there are protections and such…but it usually means the end of your career. I hold nothing against McClellan not leaving when he first started learning about the con that the administration was about to pull. He spent a lifetime working hard to get to the White House…nobody just gives it up.

    Progressive Dem bring up an interesting point. It is part of a different argument, but the flow and framing of information is a vital aspect of the larger debate. I seriously believe, surely I am not alone on this, that the only people that still believe that this war was justified from the start and that it is still “worth it,” are Faux News viewers or just hate Arab peoples. I am still shocked to find how many people still believe we found WMDs. They certainly do not watch the other news networks or seek other sources of information.

  46. John Konop says:

    jsm

    Democracy is not a form of sprinkle dust that will fix hatred between tribes that have been around since 700BC. That is why the Reagan administration brain trust concluded containment was the best strategy for the Middle East. The part we failed is getting off the dependency of their oil.

    The truth is we do not have the money or time to implement a liberal foreign policy like nation building. The less dependent we are on the tyrants who lead the countries in the Middle East including Iraq the more the radicals will focus on them.

    Also Iran loaned Iraq over 1 billion dollars our current strategy is only strengthen Iran position in Iraq. A strong federal Shia government is what Iran wants.

    I wrote this a few years ago and I think this is one way out.

    A Conservative Plan for Iraq

    http://controlcongress.com/uncategorized/a-conservative-plan-for-iraq

  47. jsm says:

    “Ravage our country? This is non-sense fear mongering.”

    GC, just keep your head in the sand. Ignorance is bliss.

    WSJ’s take:
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121210331991330989.html?mod=opinion_main_review_and_outlooks

    “The problem is that Mr. McClellan presents no major new detail to support his conclusions about Iraq, or even about the Administration’s deliberations about how to sell the war. This may be because he was the deputy press secretary for domestic issues during the run-up to war and thus rarely attended war strategy sessions.”

  48. John Konop says:

    The WSJ to not take into consideration that Treasury Secretary O’Neill, numerous fired generals, Powel…. all had similar observation about the Bush administration via Iraq is rather disingenuous.

    If you saw or read anything about this topic from the above it was very similar.

    WATCH O’Neill on 60 Minutes.

  49. Goldwater Conservative says:

    jsm,

    For one, the National Review is a tabloid. Secondly, disloyalty is not always a bad thing. Fairly often, as it turns out, disloyalty is the right thing. Examples that come to mind are “Deep Throat” with the Watergate Scandal, perhaps even Ambassador Wilson who, as most here would recall, called the Bush admin. out on their lies about Hussein trying to obtain uranium from Nigeria.

    It is ironic to note, Whistle Blower Week was from May 13th-19th.

    McClellan may end up being the one individual from the Bush Administration that does the most to promote democracy and freedom.

  50. IndyInjun says:

    Peggy Noonan summarized thusly “When I finished the book I came out not admiring Mr. McClellan or liking him but, in terms of the larger arguments,believing him.”

    And she believes him because he is the umpteenth official to report the same tendencies – arrogance, deception, hunger for power, vengefulness, and lies on the part of the POTUS.

  51. Bill Simon says:

    JSM,

    I find it rather remarkable that you ar eusing a quote from Carville who is slamming McClellan on his lack of “loyalty”.

    SO, let me get this straight: In your mind, loyalty beats honesty and integrity?

    Seig Heil! You would do well in the Bush Administration. You should apply for a job there.

  52. Tea Party says:

    Post the Marshall Plan era, the US has a woeful history of ‘nation-building’ and the Middle East is arguably the least promising region for us to share our value systems on governance.

    McClellan is a tool. His ‘book’ is an implement, carefully timed, financed and unveiled to further hurt conservatives in November. The facts speak for themeselves, the book is unnecessary.

    In the past, I lamented that the Presidential election was the choice between two lesser evils.

    Now we may be faced with the choice between evil choice between two lessers.

    Spacey: Our arrogance and sense of entitlement to a standard of living few deserve has far exceeded our legitimate capacity to maintain it.

    Do you find it inconceivable coincidence that as more Americans are hitting the age of 62 1/2 we are facing massive structural financial deficits?

    Guys like Geo Soros are aware of how this will all play out, like their Neo-Con counterparts.

    WE the people are going to really feel the pinch in 2009 and beyond. This economic cycle will adversely affect more Americans than previous downturns.

  53. bowersville says:

    A confirmed email from Bob Dole to Scott McClellan:

    “There are miserable creatures in every administration who don’t have the guts to speak up or quit if there are disagreements with the boss or colleagues. No your type soaks up the benefits of power, revels in the limelight for years…and spurred on by greed, cashes in with a scathing critique…if all these awful things were happening, you should have spoken up publicly like a man, or quit your cushy, high profile job. That would have taken integrity and courage…”

    This has nothing to do with loyalty, it has everything to do with honesty and integrity. If McClellan had any integrity he would have spoke up at the time or quit. I agree with Dole.

  54. IndyInjun says:

    O’Neill had the guts to speak up.

    And was fired.

    So was Colin Powell.

    The problem is not with the fired, but with the boss.

    He is the worst POTUS in US history just by measure of good public servants he fired, denigrated, scapegoated, demoted and ostracized.

  55. Bill Greene says:

    Bill S., we already know that it’s McCain, not Bush, who is “like Jesus Christ on the Cross”, just ask Sue Everhart. Get your analogies straight. 🙂

  56. jsm says:

    “SO, let me get this straight: In your mind, loyalty beats honesty and integrity?”

    No. Your assumption is incorrect, Bill.

  57. John Konop says:

    Former US commander in Iraq calls invasion ‘historic blunder’

    …..Getting lost in the media furor over McClellan’s memoir is the new autobiography of retired Lt. Gen. Ricardo S. Sanchez, the onetime commander of U.S. troops in Iraq, who is scathing in his assessment that the Bush administration “led America into a strategic blunder of historic proportions.”

    Among the anecdotes in “Wiser in Battle: A Soldier’s Story” is an arresting portrait of Bush after four contractors were killed in Fallujah in 2004, triggering a fierce U.S. response that was reportedly egged on by the president.

    During a videoconference with his national security team and generals, Sanchez writes, Bush launched into what he described as a “confused” pep talk:

    “Kick ass!” he quotes the president as saying. “If somebody tries to stop the march to democracy, we will seek them out and kill them! We must be tougher than hell! This Vietnam stuff, this is not even close. It is a mind-set. We can’t send that message. It’s an excuse to prepare us for withdrawal.”

    “There is a series of moments and this is one of them. Our will is being tested, but we are resolute. We have a better way. Stay strong! Stay the course! Kill them! Be confident! Prevail! We are going to wipe them out! We are not blinking!” ….

    A White House spokesman had no comment.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/01/AR2008060101961_2.html?nav=rss_print/asection

  58. Bill Simon says:

    JSM,

    THIS is what you said: “Just saw that even James Carville ripped on McClellan, calling him “incredibly disloyal.”

    By you quoting Carville in his haste to accuse McClellan of the “crime” of “disloyalty,” you are stating you believe “loyalty” is the highest of all traits, rather than honesty and integrity.

  59. IndyInjun says:

    “This Vietnam stuff, this is not even close.”

    How lovely. One who never came “closer” to Vietnam than lower Alabama and therefore learned not its lessons is talking about its “mind set?”

    Pelosi was right. Impeachment is not fitting.

  60. Bill Simon says:

    If you go back to the bluster that Saddam spoke to HIS Republican Guard before and during the Iraq war, you might note an identical tone between he and Bush.

    Hmm…I wonder…whose side was “God” really on in the Iraq war?

  61. jsm says:

    “By you quoting Carville in his haste to accuse McClellan of the “crime” of “disloyalty,” you are stating you believe “loyalty” is the highest of all traits, rather than honesty and integrity.”

    Bill, quit trying to tell me what I think. I merely mentioned another man’s stated opinion, and you’re making up crap about what traits I think are most important. You’re wrong, so stop.

  62. bowersville says:

    Indy, you are right about O’Neill and Powell. I’m not taking up for Bush and crowd, my problem is McClellan.

  63. bowersville says:

    But when I think about it, I have a problem with Powell going before the UN with such garbage on behalf of Bush. H*ll I trusted Powell and fell for the Bush line, hook line and sinker after watching and listening to Powell(on the news networks of course).

  64. Bill Simon says:

    Count me as one of the folks who could see right through Powell to Bush’s bullsh*t from the very start.

    It was all in their attitude of switching gears from Afghanistan to Iraq. They were full of sh*t from the start….AND, McClellan helped them peddle their sh*t.

  65. bowersville says:

    I have to be honest here, I looked at what I believed to be fake pictures presented by Powell and in my mind, I compared them to what I saw as a child during the Cuban Missile Crisis. And I trusted Powell, like I trusted his counter part of the 60’s showing a real threat.

    I remember practicing survival in my youth by bending over, grabbing my knees and lying under a school desk as my only hope to live through a nuclear bombing.

  66. IndyInjun says:

    Bowersville,

    I agree totally with all points.

    At least O’Neill voiced opposition.

    Powell was inconsistent in his opposition and sadly gave in when he went before the U.N.

    There is no admiration here for McClellan. He is only one of a long progression of folks pretty much telling the same tale. Many more books will be written after this gang is out of power.

    Heck, in just two weeks we got McClellan, Gen. Sanchez, and US Attorney Yglesias all coming out with books.

    We might say that “the book is being thrown” at the Bush gang.

  67. John Konop says:

    IndyInjun & Bowersville

    I agree but O Neill was savaged for telling the truth. And I agree stronger opposition at the time is the right path. Yet many people have fear of standing out and getting attacked. And also the line between loyalty to your boss and the American people is not always easy. The same is true in business.

    I can relate to attacks for speaking out against out of control spending when I ran. I will say the attacks on my family have made me hesitant to run again until my children get older.

    I am not making excuses, but I always try to walk in another man’s shoes before passing harsh judgment.

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