47 comments

  1. ConservativeCaucus says:

    Although I have disagreements with Congressman Paul, he has been a strong voice for limited government to the party that used to espouse that.

    May the GOP return to being the party of lower taxes and limited government.

  2. Donkey Kong says:

    Don’t worry, fellas. The GOP has gone through this cycle between the Rockefeller Republicans and the Coolidge Republicans repeatedly over the last 100+ years. Not that we should enjoy these moments of straying from our principles, let’s just keep an historical perspective about it.

    RP is not a Coolidge Republican. He’s not a Goldwater Conservative. He’s not a Reagan Revolutionary. Coolidge, Goldwater, and Reagan all believed in a government which minimally impacted her citizens domestically but powerfully protected them internationally. RP would love to see our military surrender in Iraq and come crawling home. Don’t get me wrong — I agree with RP that it is not our job to be the world’s police, and I abhor Bush’s policy that it is the policy of the US to actively support (i.e. force) democracy throughout (on) the world. I would love to see all countries have a working democracy, but a democratic government does not work in countries like Palestine where the citizens will vote terrorist organizations into power. And, despite the pathetic and embarrassing comments from the Archbishop of Canterbury, sharia law is wholly inconsistent with Democratic principles. As long as a citizenry holds beliefs such as these, a Democracy is relatively pointless.

    RP does not understand the massive and daunting threat of only a few evil men/women with a WMD. If we did not actively monitor terrorist networks and foreign nuclear arsenals, as well as potential enemies of state (i.e. Iran), Americans would be in great danger. RP’s isolationist foreign policy is just as ideological, and foolish, as Bush’s policy to support Democracy throughout the world regardless of the characteristics of the people there.

    CC, since when has the GOP been the party of limited government? Reagan, God bless him, only slowed the growth of government. Even the Great Communicator couldn’t manage to shrink it.

  3. IndyInjun says:

    At least he didn’t DOUBLE IT!

    The Dems never did that either – not in forty years of control.

    It is why I am now an Indy.

    It is perfectly arguable that Cynthia McKinney could not in her wildest dreams done what the likes of Saxby Chambliss has done.

    If the GOPers here were truly worried about the War on “Tearer” we would be in Pakistan fighting the terrorists instead of giving them money.

    If the “patriots” on here were true in their beliefs they would be volunteering to go to war, to send their kids, and to actually pay for it.

    GOPers are worse than the Democrats and have done FAR more damage.

  4. Donkey Kong says:

    “GOPers are worse than the Democrats and have done FAR more damage.”

    Completely disagree. If the Dems had their way unimpeded, they would drastically increase spending. The only reason Clinton balanced the budget was the GOP Congress. When you have two parties pulling in opposite direction, little movement is made in either direction. When both parties move in the same direction, much ground is traveled. That’s what has happened under Bush.

  5. joe says:

    Indy,

    If the “patriots” on here were true in their beliefs they would be volunteering to go to war, to send their kids, and to actually pay for it.

    I volunteered for Desert Storm, as did my son. I retired prior to my son going to OIF. He has since retired. I pay and pay and pay.

    The GOP only supports bigger government, and that is why I too am an Indy.

  6. StevePerkins says:

    You’re absolutely correct, Donkey Kong, but the thing is that the “ground traveled” is pretty much exactly the same regardless of which party is leading. When the Democrats control the executive and legislative branches simultaneously (i.e. FDR, LBJ), we get involved in foreign wars and dramatically grow the size of government. When the Republicans control both of those branches, we get involved in foreign wars and dramatically grow the size of government. The greatest periods of American prosperity come during times of split-party rule, which not-so-coincidentally are the times in which the government does the least.

  7. Donkey Kong says:

    Steve,

    I completely agree. Power corrupts!! (Even Republicans!!)

    However, I would have loved to see Reagan with a GOP Congress. He tried to cut spending and reform SS and was spurred by the Dem Congress. Who knows, maybe he would have pulled a Bush, but I tend to think Reagan would have stood up to the GOP Congress more on spending.

  8. IndyInjun says:

    D.K.

    WRONG.

    Ross Perot and the 19 million votes he got campaigning against the mad spending scared both parties straight and was the impetus behind the GOP contract with America.

    Cynthia McKinney could never have done the damage to this country that Chambliss has done because the blue dogs would have stopped it.

    The reason that Pelosi and Reid have gotten nowhere since 2006 is that the conservative to moderate elements in their party won’t let them. Would that the Georgia GOP delegation, besides our Charlie Norwood, been so principled instead of following the lunatic leadership of George W. Bush.

  9. IndyInjun says:

    Of course, the GOP spins it that the Dem Congress is incompetent, instead of crediting the Barrows, the Baucus’ , the Webb’s, the Marshalls, the Sprats, and the Nelson’s of the Dems for moderating and reining in the lefties.

  10. Donkey Kong says:

    Indy,

    Your point about Perot is interesting. Truthfully, I was more concerned about my 3rd grade kickball team than I was Ross Perot’s presidential bid, so my knowledge of the 92 election and its ensuing effects on policy is all retrospective (and practically nil, for that matter. I have not heard someone mention lingering effects of Perot’s election bid on post-election policy). That said, without having been politically astute at the time, what you say makes sense, though I haven’t seen it stated elsewhere. It *was* the GOP that held Clinton to a line; that is not debatable, IMO. But, you may be right about how and why the GOP held that line in the first place.

    Peachy, awwwww. You don’t luv the huckster anymore????? I don’t see how you can be such a fan of Paul Broun, who is a good libertarian, and also be a fan of Huck, who is a big government liberal in the guise of a conservative. Guess what, Peachy, even good Christians can have crappy policy! There are a number of Dems that are good upstanding people; that doesn’t change the fact that their policy is terrible.

  11. GOPeach says:

    Mike Huckabee added Louisiana to his wins tonight, as a large chunk of Republican voters rebelled against the party establishment coalescing behind John McCain.

  12. Tea Party says:

    Sadly, the one thing I do know about the current political reality is that it is, in fact, a two-party game. The points made by Independants, valid as they are, truthful and pragmatic, are lost in the two party system of gridlock governance. That fateful fact may be an unrecoverable shame.

    Am I the only person who seems to think that any future massive financial U.S. meltdown will coincide with the fact that the rate of our population aging in the 50-62 1/2 year range is at its’ zenith?

    Coincidences like that occur only in Vegas. Or in well-funded, well-heeled, well-connected 7th degree of precision actuarial shop.

    This IS the most important election in a very long time, and frankly, according to Will Rogers, in the end,”… more people will be more concerned about where to park their car, than whom to vote for…”

  13. Donkey Kong says:

    TP,

    You are right. And that is why this election is so depressing, even in light of the historical perspective of the cyclical nature of the GOP between the Rockefellers and the Coolidges. McCain is not a conservative, yet what we need more than ever is a true small government conservative. If only Ron Paul had good foreign policy. I could then look past his desires to return to the gold standard and abolish the Fed and consider supporting him.

  14. Romegaguy says:

    Mitt has more delegates than Phuckabee and Phuckabee is running out of states that are heavily populated by inbreds. McCain IS the nominee

  15. Carpe Forem says:

    Donkey et al,

    You obviously do not understand Ron Paul’s foreign policy as it is the exact same as Ronald Reagan’s minus CIA involvement. If there is a threat, then deal eliminate it and return home. No nation building, no long term entanglements.

    His wish to bring the troops home is similar to what RR did after the Lebanon bombing of the Marines. Ron Paul would treat threats in the same manner as RR did with Momar Kadafi and as Israel did with Iran. If there is a threat, send them back 10 years or so with a few bombs and less American lives. And if there is a large threat to our national sovereignty then Congress should declare war and go after the enemy with the full force and backing of the American public. I’ve said this before, our founding fathers knew the difference between defense and offense and the latter should NEVER be employed or you’ll have a situation very similar to what we currently find ourselves in.

    America should lead by example and not by force, at the same time, let the world know, we will defend ourselves with the greatest military that has ever existed on this planet. Associate with us, trade with us, but if you ever attack us, you will cease to exist.

    This in a nutshell (pun intended) is Ron Paul’s foreign policy.

  16. debbie0040 says:

    Huckabee is finished. He has strong support with 1/3 of the GOP base. The othe 2/3rd can’t stand him. He won’t be VP…

    McCain won Washington with 40 delegates.

    No one got 50% + 1 of the vote in the Louisiana GOP primary so the delegates that were elected at the Louisiana GOP Caucus will select the delegates at the state convention on 2-16.

    They will most likely award most to McCain

    http://reason.com/blog/show/124573.html

    Here is how National Review’s detail-driven political reporter David Freddoso explained it:
    Last night, something like 20,000 Republicans in Louisiana picked the delegates to their state convention, who will select half of the state’s delegates to the national convention (or, as Jim correctly points out, they may select nearly all of them).

    The official results are not in yet, but I’m told that McCain beat all of the other candidates. The conservative “uncommitted” effort — designed to influence the party platform — might have come out ahead of everyone…

    Ron Paul finished second. His supporters reportedly mobbed the 11 polling places, but many of them could not participate because they were not registered Republicans. They were required to cast provisional ballots, many of which will not count. (The provisional ballots are part of the reason for the delay in tallying the results.)

    Axom confirmed all of this and explained that the “Uncommitted” slate was called the “Pro-Life, Pro-Family” slate. Until yesterday there was a good organization for Fred Thompson. When Fred moseyed off the stage, his canny organizers backed the PLPF slate and handed out ballots like the one pictured above, encouraging people to “win one for the Gipper” by voting for now-homeless delegates. “It was a very slick move on their part,” Axom said.

  17. Ms_midtown says:

    Huckabee needs a goal beyond scoring delegate for VP.

    – Platform planks
    I have not read the Republican party platform lately but maybe it’s time for some changes.
    Huckabee should bring it up.
    Especially regaring Huckabees ‘s working class little guy voter block.

    – Proportional delegate representation
    Jesse Jackson brought this change into the Democratic system in 1988. I bet Huck and Mitt could pair up for this one.

    Huck needs to shake that tree, get some peaches.

  18. GOPeach says:

    McCAIN is the senator of a border state – AZ. and yet he has completely ignored BORDER CONTROL.

    He says we will be in Iraq 100 years. This is because he is a CFR member. That pretty much explains a lot.

  19. GOPeach says:

    Ron Paul raised awareness that RUDY, FRED, MITT, and McCAIN are all CFR members …. as are HILLARY and OBAMA…

    The only NON-CFR member standing is HUCKABEE!!!!!

  20. debbie0040 says:

    This is how sleezy and dishonest the Huckster is:

    “Mike Huckabee was host Tim Russert’s guest on NBC’s Meet the Press. Huckabee thinks competition will be good for the GOP and will not let al Qaeda win by handing the election to Hillary or Barry. He had good words for Rush Limbaugh and what the radio talker has done for conservatism. He did not insult anyone except when he called John McCain’s immigration position, “way out the mainstream” and “unorthodox.”

    The Huckster supported the plan last year in a May 23rd interview with the Washington Post.

  21. debbie0040 says:

    This sounds like a decent and honorable man:

    http://www.judicialwatch.org/judicial-watch-announces-list-washington-s-ten-most-wanted-corrupt-politicians-2007

    6. Governor Mike Huckabee (R-AR): Governor Huckabee enjoyed a meteoric rise in the polls in December 2007, which prompted a more thorough review of his ethics record. According to The Associated Press: “[Huckabee’s] career has also been colored by 14 ethics complaints and a volley of questions about his integrity, ranging from his management of campaign cash to his use of a nonprofit organization to subsidize his income to his destruction of state computer files on his way out of the governor’s office.” And what was Governor Huckabee’s response to these ethics allegations? Rather than cooperating with investigators, Huckabee sued the state ethics commission twice and attempted to shut the ethics process down.

  22. debbie0040 says:

    This really sounds like a decent and honorable man. He made Judicial Watch’s list of the top ten most corrupt politicians in 2007

    “-6. Governor Mike Huckabee (R-AR): Governor Huckabee enjoyed a meteoric rise in the polls in December 2007, which prompted a more thorough review of his ethics record. According to The Associated Press: “[Huckabee’s] career has also been colored by 14 ethics complaints and a volley of questions about his integrity, ranging from his management of campaign cash to his use of a nonprofit organization to subsidize his income to his destruction of state computer files on his way out of the governor’s office.” And what was Governor Huckabee’s response to these ethics allegations? Rather than cooperating with investigators, Huckabee sued the state ethics commission twice and attempted to shut the ethics process down. “

  23. joe says:

    Debbie,

    I am getting confused. You have always come across as an energetic young-un. You are now starting to sound like a bitter old woman. Lots of people talk about GOPeach’s meds, but has anybody checked yours?

  24. Donkey Kong says:

    Peachy,

    Be nice to Debbie. You and I agree on Paul Broun, but me and Debbie were two of very few on this site to support a candidate back in 2006 whose loss led to another RINO getting into high office in GA. We took the heat in a race that was far, far more heated than anything we are seeing now (the pathetic accusations of forced abortions in the Mariana Islands come to mind…). I like you Peach. You add a spark. But stop railing on Debbie so much and realize that it really is *you* that are way off on this Huckabee thing.

  25. Donkey Kong says:

    Oh, and Peachy, what’s all this CFR nonsense? Oh, that’s right. Those bankers are running it all! And the Illuminati too! Peach, I’m just saying — they know you’re on to them, and they’re coming for you. You know it just wouldn’t stand for someone to out these world conspirators.

  26. Chris says:

    Council on Foreign Relations – which depending on the quality of your meds is either:

    1) a shadowy cabal of old while men who circumvent US sovergntry by making alliances outside of treaty and law, or

    2) A bunch of Foreign Policy geeks who sit around and debate things

  27. Jace Walden says:

    BREAKING NEWS

    Although I am saddened by the news of the Paul Campaign’s “scaling down”, I am pleased that Paul lasted as long as he did. Agree with him or disagree with him, Paul brought some issues back to the mainstream that never should have left. I hope he continues to be an advocate for free markets, small government, humble foreign policy and fiscal responsibility in Congress. Should he decide to run for President as a Independent or third-party candidate, I will support his candidacy.

    Until then, I will be supporting the candidacy of John McCain. There are many, many things I disagree with McCain on, but there are also many things in which I agree with him wholeheartedly–the primary being his sense of general disdain for the religious right, and his journeyman efforts to cut porkbarrel spending.

  28. RandyMiller says:

    I salute Mr. Paul for his insightful contribuition to the election. I felt he was the most “conservative” candidate out there.
    I agreed with most everything he said, namely that we can’t be the worlds police, money doesn’t grow on trees, and governemt should stay out of peoples business as much as possible.
    To me, the aforementioned are what conservative ideals are all about.

    I was a McCain supporter back in 2000, and the last 7 years have reinforced my belief that I was right. I liked him better then, he was more outspoken and didn’t kiss up to certain segments of society that seem to have a direct line to God.

  29. GOPeach says:

    It amazes me how many people are clueless on the agenda of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Please do educate yourselves by a Google and YouTube Search. There is plenty to know about.

    Ron Paul was VERY informed! That was why he was ignored – he was the whistle-blower.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSXQLUIc1Ak

    I suggest a STRONG CUP of COFFEE will help.

  30. Donkey Kong says:

    Peach,

    I suggest a strong dose of realism, a dash of rationality, and an eradication of baseless conspiratory musings. When RP sounds off on the CFR, he sounds almost as ridiculous as Kucinich claiming to have seen a UFO.

    Love,
    Donkey

  31. GOPeach says:

    GOOD NEWS!!!!

    Paul Weyrich Chairman / CEO – Free Congress Foundation – a GOLDWATER REPUBLICAN….

    endorsed HUCKABEE!!!!

    The GOP must connect with the working class MORAL CONSERVATIVES who are hurting economically now trying to educated kids, pay a mortgage, and basically survive.

    Huckabee relates best to mainstream America.

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