Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead

With a McCain FL win, does this mean the Romney-pushin’ Republican establishment is now toast?

76 comments

  1. Icarus says:

    Debbie is for Romney
    Peach is for Huckabee

    Everyone else should vote McCain.

    “The very future of PeachPundit may depend on it.”

  2. Rogue109 says:

    “With a McCain FL win, does this mean the Romney-pushin’ Republican establishment is now toast?”

    No. Next question?

  3. This was a serious blow to Romney. From what I hear, he unloaded a substantial amount of money there. Super Tuesday won’t be kind to him either, but we’ll see.

    Georgia, Alabama, Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee are all leaning Huckabee. We ain’t quiting yet. There are many miles to go. One thing I can guarantee, they’ll not outwork us.

  4. ConservativeCaucus says:

    I guess now the question is how much of his own money is Romney willing to put in?

    He is a businessman… he sees the writing on the wall. It will be interesting to see what he does from here on out.

  5. Ms_midtown says:

    Romney supporters will stick to the end.
    Just read blogs like National Review, Hugh Hewitt, the other radio hosts ( except Medved ).

    By the way if Romeny is such a great businessman, where did the family business
    ( automobiles ) go?
    Japan

  6. StevePerkins says:

    It will be interesting to see how quickly the McCain-haters can pull a 180 after Super Tuesday and rally around the guy for November. Will the GOP base make a go of it, or just give up and stay fragmented?

  7. Harry says:

    As a long-time conservative and GOP partisan, I say to all you anti-McCain people: QUITYERBITCHIN’! McCain is as tough, independent-minded a conservative as it gets in today’s real world. Rush and the Freepers need to take a powder.

  8. Ms_midtown says:

    If you are a Democrat and want to unify the Republicans around McCain
    Vote Hillary

    McCain/Giuliani is a very competitive ticket.
    Giuliani has shown he is great at crisis management, which is what McCain needs — a backup quarterback. Not idealogical balance.

  9. StevePerkins says:

    McCain’s biggest weakness is that the base doesn’t see him as right-wing enough. He’s not going to pick a running mate like Guiliani… whose biggest weakness is that the base doesn’t seem him as right-wing enough. McCain will pick probably pick someone to help him appeal to the Bible-thumpers. I can see him maybe going with Fred (I’m still half-convinced that helping McCain was the whole point of Thompson’s candidacy to begin with)… although I’m not sure if ANYONE from this crappy field would make a good running mate. Maybe a Governor or Senator from a battleground state… like Voinovich of Ohio, or Martinez in Florida (a Hispanic pick could counter the racial/gender aspect of facing Obama or Hillary).

  10. Bull Moose says:

    Possible VPs for McCain:

    The Obvious:
    Mike Huckabee

    Others:
    Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty
    South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford
    Senator Sam Brownback
    Senator Lamar Alexander
    Former Senator Phil Gramm

    My personal pick would be Gramm!

  11. eburke says:

    I thought that with a closed primary where only Republicans could vote that they were supposed to show who the true conservative is or at least that is what Rush and the establishment guys have been telling us for two weeks.
    Well the Republicans voted and they rejected Romney.

  12. Doug Deal says:

    Bull,

    McCain and Gramm would be the death of the Republican party, are you sure you aren’t a Democratic operative? Not only is Gramm a snoozefest and partially involved in the Enron Scandal, he is 66 years old, and would be 74 before he could run for President. That means if they are elected, once again the developmental post of VP goes to waste when it could be used to bring a future candidate to prominence.

    The person to grab if the Republican party wanted to mitigate the disaster of a McCain Candidacy/Presidency is John Kasich. John Kasich would strengthen the Midwest (the most important part of the country in Presidential races) and would bring to the forefront a fiscal conservative that would be an exciting candidate in 2016, when he would be 64.

  13. Painterman says:

    If McCain is the Nominee, I will not vote. I can not vote for someone who is not a Republican. That is why we are not in the majority anymore. A lot of people in Washington who say they are Republicans, but they are RINO’s. McCain is the RINO of RINO’s. I will not vote for a liberal for President. Rudy was in the same basket for me, so his predicted endorsement of McCain doesn’t surprise me or make me want to vote for McCain any more it only confirms what I already know. He’s not a true conservative and it will be the disastrous if he were the nominee.

  14. John Konop says:

    The irony is McCain won via his amnesty plan for illegal immigrants’ .Mel Martinez endorsement and co author of amnesty Kennedy/McCain bill put McCain over the top in Florida. While people like Debbie attacked Huckabee on immigration they got the most open border amnesty candidate.

    And now Thompson and Rudy will help McCain officially not just off the record. I wonder if Fred heads get they were used to help McCain?

    McCain sweeps the Hispanic vote in Florida

    HC-In the first Republican test of strength among Latino voters, Arizona Sen. John McCain won by a landslide.

    Early exit polls cited by Fox News found that McCain was taking 50 percent of the Hispanic vote. Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who campaigned long and hard in Miami’s Little Havana, was running second with 26 percent. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney was a distant third at 16 percent, and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee rated little more than an asterisk at 5 percent.

    About half of the Latino voters were Cuban-Americans, a traditional Republican voting bloc in the Sunshine state. Overall, Hispanics comprised one in ten of the GOP primary voters.

  15. drjay says:

    look i will admit i did not vote for mccain in the primary-and if you want to vote for some else in the primary hat is reasonable-but you “i’ll just stay home if he’s the nominee” folks are absurd–although the ga gop has shot itself in the foot that way a few times in the past 10 r 15 years allowing max cleland to become a senator and keeping ga from having a gop guv until sonny-b/c they insist on mking good the enemy of better-but i digress–there have been a few policies of mccain’s i do not like–but if you people can look past romney’s recent conversions–i think you can give mccain a pass for saying he has heard us on immigration–he has been a consistent social conservative in his time in dc and even when he did not support the tax cuts its b/c he was concerned about keeping spending under control, he has been right on iraq and the surge, and has consistently said he would follow bin laden to the gates of hell to bring his head back on a platter–not exactly the typical liberal talking points–in 2006 the last year the liberal americans for democratic action has numbers avaialble he scored 15%–again not a flaming liberal–but squarely in the mainstream of the gop–you people stay home in november if he is the nominee and let me know how the next clinton admin works out for you–esp. w/ a dem congress and the chance to appt a slew of judges…

  16. LoyaltyIsMyHonor says:

    “If McCain is the Nominee, I will not vote. I can not vote for someone who is not a Republican. ”

    Painterman, what do you consider a RINO as opposed to a “true” Republican? Like most self-proclaimed “Republicans,” you confuse being a Republican with being a conservative….nothing could be further from the truth.

    What’s that line again? “The greatest trick the Devil ever played on the world was to convince us that he doesn’t exist.”

  17. Chris says:

    Disclaimer: I’m still undecided.

    I think its funny how so many people think McCain backstabbed the GOP when he is the one who has been right on issues all along: The need for more troops in Iraq. The need to curtail our spending. Even his supposed “backstab” was an attempt to solve a problem that the GOP let fester for 6 years while in the majority. Once the GOP’s total incompetence lost them the right to dictate the solution, Sen. McCain did what he needed to to get _something_ done: work with the majority opposition.

    Face it. Those of use who slavishly supported the President despite all his screw-up bear the responsbility for the state we’re in today.

    Now Suck up and deal.

  18. Jace Walden says:

    It’s ironic how much “conservatives” hate McCain, but are willing to jump ship to support a pro-abortion, pro-socialized health insurance, pro-gay rights, anti-Bush tax cuts liberal phony like Mitt Romney.

    I love it.

  19. Jace Walden says:

    Then again, “conservatives” really only care about a couple of things. The candidate has to be:

    (1) Rich
    (2) Telegenic

    Romney must be the clear conservative choice hands down.

  20. Jace Walden says:

    I wouldn’t be surprised if one of the “conservative” publication published a wanted ad in the classifieds:

    WANTED–Conservative Candidate
    Must be White Anglo-Saxon Male. Telegenic and rich preferred. Hates gays and immigrants a plus.

  21. Bill Simon says:

    Upon careful consideration over the past 48 hours, there is a really good chance I will be voting for McCain.

    Why? Not because of “momentum” or the Florida trounce of Romney.

    More because of why the trounce of Romney occured. And, I believe that Floridian Republicans can recognize the same thing that I see: McCain, for all of his faults, is not a liar. Romney is (how many flip-flopping positions can one person take in the span of 3 years?).

    MOST thinking Republicans (i.e., the non-establishment Republicans) really don’t like liars in their midst. They’ve had the Liar Bush as their establishment candidate for 8 years. They’re sick of him and his ilk.

    Therefore, they gravitate towards McCain.

    The fact that all of the “establishment” legislators in this state have jumped on Romney also tell me that Romney is the wrong choice.

  22. eburke says:

    Bill,
    I have to agree with you on this one. I like Huckabee but I can support McCain not for all of his positions but because he has been consistent. I know where he stands. Romney is an arrogant, lying, SOB and he has really turned me off. I know where McCain will be. I have no idea of what a President Romney would support when in office. I don’t particularly like what he supported in Massachusetts. Now that he has become a convert to the conservative faith, he asks me to trust him. No way.

  23. Painterman says:

    I’m of the school that a “true Republican” is a conservative. I’ve held my nose in the past, but if McCain is the nominee, I will not vote for him. He violated his oath of office with McCain Feingold, He has backstabed the GOP on the tax cuts, He has called all of us against amnesty for illigals racist, on and on. I can not vote for the man. I will not waste my vote for Huckabee or Thompson or any other name on the ballot, I’ll be voting for Romney, he has the best conservative standing. Not perfect by any streach, and not my first choice, just what I have left.

  24. Bill Simon says:

    Painterman,

    Do you equally hold any of your elected Republicans in this state who VOTED for McCain-Feingold equally responsible, and therefore, the antitheses of being a “non-conservative” that you wish to paint McCain with?

  25. Tea Party says:

    A True Republican to me, stands for smaller government, less taxes, fiscally conservative.
    Socially, a True Republican is not swayed by either the religious ‘right’ or politics of exclusion.

    The reason for discord within the GOP is that NONE of those principles were promoted in the last twelve years .

    McCain consistency wins over Mitts record.

    Nobody remarked on the Dem turnout, which was very high. Signalled to me, a marked distaste for Obama, this will be one mighty interesting Tuesday race!

    Great call on Rudy, and comment, Bull Moose.

  26. Doug Deal says:

    Jace,

    I dispise McCain for McCain Feingold and his tone deafness on the fact that it was a huge mistake. Not understanding how it is a blatant attack on the First Amendment reveals a lot about the way he views the Constitution.

    What other right will he be willing to curtail for his own political end. (He only got on the campaign finance reform kick as cover for his serious ethical issues in the Keating 5 incident.

    Further than that, his pathway to immigration for illegal aliens is a mistake. Rewarding those that are breaking the law is a mistake. I would love to make it easier for immigrants to come to the USA and work, but only if they do so legaly and have respect for our rule of law.

    There are plenty of ideas that would lead to self deportation, and respect for the rule of law. McCain opposes them.

  27. Bill Simon says:

    Doug,

    I’ll repeat what I said above for your benefit as well:

    Do you equally hold any of your elected Republicans in this state who VOTED for McCain-Feingold equally responsible, and therefore, the antitheses of being a “conservative” that you wish to paint McCain with?

  28. GodHatesTrash says:

    I like the comment on Romney and the Prell.

    You rednecks seem to have a big problem with guys that bathe and comb their hair every day, what with your Mitt and Edwards bashing.

    No wonder so many of you are not only ugly, but filthy, too. You think that daily showers will make it easier for the rest of us to see that you’re gay.

  29. GodHatesTrash says:

    If Romney wants to do better with the GOP base, he needs to stop bathing and talk more like an illiterate southron. Get Billy Ray Cyrus’s hairstylist – a mullet would get you about a 15% jump with the GOP core.

    Ask Hillbilly Fred if’n you can borry his pickemup trick, Mitt. He didn’t use it much – just to nap in. Better yet, find out if Jed Clampett will let you buy his flivver.

    And then, do some bird hunting. Shoot a friend in the face with some birdshot. Or – better yet – one of those chickenhawk sons of yours.

  30. GodHatesTrash says:

    I thought Kasich had some Craig-Foley issues…

    Although that evidently gets a lot of Repubs elected…

  31. IndyInjun says:

    Drjay – Please explain by what stretch of your imagination is Saxby Chambliss one iota less liberal than Max Cleland.

    In that instance, we replaced a good socialist with a better socialist.

  32. IndyInjun says:

    Shoot, GHT, that gay bashing thing hasn’t exactly worked out for the Repugnant Party now, has it?

    Brighter folks would put down the matches after burning the fingers on one hand.

    Foley.
    Craig.
    The lobbyist Gannon
    Counselor to the high Bush Haggard.
    McCain Florida Chairman Allen.

    Oh well, there is another hand left, if it can be extracted from their buddy’s fly.

  33. GodHatesTrash says:

    Now Bill, I was just pointing out that just because someone bathes regular and combs their hair every day don’t mean they gay.

    I know I’m way different than a lot of y’all.

    Unlike most of y’all, I like the ladies, even my wife. So, I get in the shower every day, brush my teeth at least once sometimes twice a day, and, hellfire, sometimes I even blowdry my hair because I have so damn much of it.

    Now, if’n I was just going to get my jollies in the mens room at the airport like Mr. Craig, or in the parking lot at Chattahoochee River like that what’s-his-name a few years back , I might not need to spend so much time on my personal hygiene and appearance is all I’m sayin’.

    Mitt has got several wives waiting on him in Mor(m)on heaven, so he needs to look good for the ladies, and Edwards – well, Elizabeth ain’t gonna last too long, I reckon he ought to try to look good for her to the very end, don’t you think? She does seem like a real nice lady, even though I know most of y’all hate women, she seems like a good un.

  34. drjay says:

    IndyInjun // Jan 30, 2008 at 1:52 pm

    Drjay – Please explain by what stretch of your imagination is Saxby Chambliss one iota less liberal than Max Cleland.

    the americans for democratic acti0n rank cleland lifetime as the most liberal senator in ga history, chambliss for all his faults is not so ranked…

  35. GodHatesTrash says:

    All you poor McCain-Feingold haters – can’t drop your millions on your favorite candidate’s campaign?

    Silly fools – your food stamps and welfare cheese don’t buy a whole lotta yard signs… besides, if you give them to the Huckleberry or Hillbilly Fred, what are you gonna trade for beer and chew?

  36. Jason Pye says:

    Romney is an arrogant, lying, SOB and he has really turned me off.

    And Huckabee isn’t? He has been just as dishonest and misleading about his record .

  37. John Konop says:

    rugby fan

    Good point but McCain is not getting votes from social conservatives in the primary now. It is clear Huckabee is hurting Romney by staying in. But it is a smart move by Huckabee because both Romney and McCain need him in a general election and he can be the king maker.

  38. DMZDave says:

    McCain is obviously not a true conservative. True conservatives as well as most true liberals tend to avoid military service and let other folks fight their nation’s wars. Bad enough McCain’s whole family served but now his son went off and joined the Marines and volunteered for duty in Iraq. What kind of a conservative is he ? Mykind of conservative – loves the country, will fight for it and he obviously instilled that same love for country in his son. Good man.

  39. John Konop says:

    Chris Farris

    The fact is McCain was using gay bashing against Romney in Florida via robo-calls. Also I would argue people like you who support creating second class citizens via our immigration policy are the racist and or support exploitation of people for profit. Adam Smith the father of free market economics was clear that the system does not work unless labor and employers are on equal footing via legal rights!

  40. GodHatesTrash says:

    Well Indy, the gay bashers in the GOP always end up hittin’ their own damn selves in the head it seems…

  41. Bill Simon says:

    “free market economics was clear that the system does not work unless labor and employers are on equal footing via legal rights!”

    John, please define what you (and Adam Smith) mean by “equal legal rights” Please give me an example of what isn’t equal, and an example of what it equal legal rights.

  42. John Konop says:

    If you have illegal immigrants you do not have an employee on equal footing with the employer. If you flood the country with Z visa employees who can be deported at the employers will you do not have equal footing.

    As I said Adam Smith was clear employees most have the same legal rights to negotiate wages as the employer or it is exploitation.

  43. John Konop says:

    Bill

    Much is made of the “father of deregulation.” Adam Smith has been
    designated such by many in the field of economics. His connection takes on
    a mythical role. These connections are taken for granted, and perhaps,
    like mythical legends are not always true. Adam Smith’s beliefs have been
    stereotyped so when someone says “individuality” or “deregulation”, we are
    supposed to think “Adam Smith.” The actual reading of Smith’s books must
    be a curiosity because he constantly winds up supporting the rights of
    workers and seeking a fair relationship between employers and workers.
    While Smith is connected to “laissez faire” economics, throughout The
    Wealth of Nations, there is a strong sentiment that society is better off
    when the common worker is treated good.

    http://www.columbia.edu/~hauben/CS/adamsmith.txt

  44. Chris says:

    I support giving immigrants who come to this county illegally the same legal rights that citizens have, perhaps with the exception of voting rights. Thats why I support both amnesty and unlimited worker visas.

    It is also why I think Rudy was correct when he instituted his don’t ask policy in NYC regarding the status of someone reporting a crime.

  45. GodHatesTrash says:

    Gee, Steve, read my post again.

    Elizabeth has a Stage 4 cancer, which gives her a one in four chance of making it five years. Her chances are actually less than that, because hers is a recurrence.

    Of course, the fact that she is very very sick – probably terminally ill – hasn’t stopped some of the good folks here from completely trashing her husband because he has an expensive haircut and a nice house.

  46. John Konop says:

    Jason

    If what I said is false about economics and your view as well as Chris on immigration, trade and exploitation of people please demonstrate it.

    You and Chris both think that trade deals and immigration should have no consideration of legal rights of workers. How is it that you guys do not support the exploitation of people?

  47. Jason Pye says:

    I think Konop has been reading too much of Das Kapital.

    Chris and I support immigration because we believe capitalism and the markets are the best way to spread our way of life and to better the standard of living of all individuals.

  48. GodHatesTrash says:

    Steve, I actually didn’t mean to offend (which is not something I would normally say) but Elizabeth has Stage 4 cancer, which gives her odds of less than one in 4 of being alive in five years.

    Besides, her serious illness hasn’t stopped the kkkretins in here from trashing her husband for no reason other than he spends money on his haircuts and lives in a nice house.

  49. John Konop says:

    Chris Farris

    The fact is the Z visa as with most temporary visa programs do not give immigrant workers the same rights. An employer can deport the worker at any time for any reason.

    As far as the trade deals NAFTA, CAFTA WTO CHINA…. they do not have any protection for against slave labor conditions. Also China has no laws protecting intellectual property rights.

    I am all for legal immigration with workers having full rights other than voting. And real FREE TRADE based on each side respected basic human rights and a legal system with justice. Adam Smith was clear that tariffs were needed if the above was not in place.

    Please tell me why you think Adam Smith is wrong and you are right?

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