Perdue, prayer, and rain in Georgia

Jay Homnick at the American Spectator online (www.spectator.org) appears to think that the rain Georgia got a few days ago (and, one would assume, on Thanksgiving, when I was running the Atlanta Half Marathon in a downpour) was a direct result of Governor Perdue’s mid-November prayer on the Capitol steps (“Church and State! Church and State!”).

His logic (and vocabulary) are a bit convoluted, but hey, whatever works for him. I guess the lesson here is that Sonny Did is a holier man than these guys are.

8 comments

  1. StevePerkins says:

    Uhh, yeah… if you groan at the absurdity of our governor “praying for rain” after failing for years to put together a serious water plan, that means you’re an atheist. Great reasoning there. Of course, this magazine’s website is STILL running feature stories about John Kerry and the Swift Boat Veterans… so I doubt they’re striving for any theme other than mindless echo-chamber.

    Can anyone explain what the random “Mike Tyson is a chicken” shot in the last paragraph is all about?!?

  2. StevePerkins says:

    Huh? When did I become a Democrat?!? You DO know that periodically criticizing/questioning the GOP is not the same as being a Democrat?

    Of course, if I WERE… it’d be great to be someone’s favorite.

  3. Trackboy1 says:

    Ouch…

    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1684513,00.html
    Did Georgia Bring the Drought on Itself?

    Georgia was enduring its worst drought in a century, and it had already asked President Bush and the Supreme Court for relief. So on Nov. 13, Republican Governor Sonny Perdue appealed to a higher power, hosting a statehouse vigil to “pray up a storm,” begging God to bring the rain he had withheld for 14 months.

    But it wasn’t God who allowed an outdoor theme park to build a million-gallon mountain of artificial snow while the Southeast was running dry; it was Governor Perdue and his fellow elected officials. They also allowed the wasteful irrigation of Georgia’s cotton farms and the rampant overbuilding and overslurping of metropolitan Atlanta.

  4. Bill Simon says:

    If it was Sonny who caused the rain to fall (and NOT the cold front that had been moving across the United States the week before), then shouldn’t he start holding these events weekly?

    The loquacious writer of the American Spectator should stop smoking grass and open a book on meteorology.

Comments are closed.