A Fascinating Read

Hat tip to Andrew for a link to this article in the Daily Report about the mother of the victim in the Genarlow Wilson case.

It appears she felt bullied into pressing charges, but the prosecutor taped the conversation and has a different take. It makes it very interesting to read.

At a minimum, Wilson’s defense team gets an A+ for the PR campaign. Now, I have a question, why can’t Wilson’s sentence be pardoned or commuted and just end this thing and save the taxpayers some money?

18 comments

  1. Rogue109 says:

    Super story! Yeah, B.J. Bernstein gets a A+ for being a hypocrite.

    Here’s my favorite gem from her: “There are not “hard, fast rules” on prosecutors’ behavior in this situation. But, she said, “If you’re willing to do this due to media and political pressures, the question becomes who are you, and what are your motives?””

    A better question is what are Bernstein’s motives? Being a zealous advocate for her client or drawing out this case in obtuse directions for her own career?

    If you’d like to ask her yourself, just check out the procedure listed on her website: “Media inquiries, please contact: Wendy Guarisco,
    The Guarisco Group.”

    That sums up her real interest in Wilson…

  2. Rick Day says:

    Now, I have a question, why can’t Wilson’s sentence be pardoned or commuted and just end this thing and save the taxpayers some money?

    Answer: it would expose the ugly truth that Governor Per-dew, indeed, has no soul.

  3. Loren says:

    It’s not Perdue’s fault for failing to pardon Wilson, because he can’t. In Georgia, the governor doesn’t have the power to grant clemency or pardons.

    Rather, only the state Pardons and Parole Board has the power to grant clemency or give any other relief from a sentence.

  4. Nicki says:

    And pardoning Wilson wouldn’t address the issue, which is that the law is so fucking stupid that Wilson was prosecutable.

  5. Nicki says:

    Actually, Perdue shouldn’t pardon Wilson ’cause it won’t address the issue — which is that the law is so incredibly stupid that Wilson could be prosecuted and incarcerated and ultimately branded with a scarlet A and kept from employment, worship, and other forms of social interaction for a lengthy period due to a consensual experience.

  6. According to Baker’s Op-Ed, he has a deal that would release him from prison right now, give him first offender status (no record), and keep him off sexual offender registry. The real question is why he isn’t taking it. I guess the attorney and he haven’t signed the book deal yet.

  7. jm says:

    I had heard about Baker’s deal, but I thought Wilson would still have to register. Did Baker change the deal so he doesn’t have to register?

  8. Nicki says:

    Because he’s not a sexual predator? He would remain charged for statuatory rape, would he not?

    I would find that offensive, as well, if I felt that a) what I did was not in line with that and b) I had already lost a variety of things, like my freedom, as a result of being charged inappropriately or at all.

  9. drjay says:

    e.j.

    your piece in the “westside spirit” this week does a really good job of explaining how this wilson cat was/is so not an innocent bystander getting screwed over by the system but an actual criminal adjucated by the system. i do not know if it was published anyhwere else but it should be.

    thanks for all your great work.

  10. The Comma Guy says:

    1 – Since 1983, the Governor has no role in granting pardons.

    2 – Aggravated Child Molestation is one of several crimes whose sentences are specifically removed from the authority of the Parole Board to review and reduce. Check out OCGA 17-10-6.1

  11. EAVDad says:

    I tend to agree with the Senator (whether it’s really him or not). It’s not like he didn’t break the law. He did. I feel that his sentence was unfair and it was an unintentional consequence of a law that most people — otherwise — would agree with.

    So, at this point, a plea deal, like one that appears to be on the table, would be best for everyone.

  12. drjay says:

    e.j. does a thorough job of discussing the entire case in the piece he wrote, including the charges, the actual conviction (aggravated child molestation) the plea bargaining that the other participants agreed to (including the fact that one of the buddies was convicted of a charge of false imprisonment for locking one the girls in the bathroom in between these “consensual” sex acts) and that even though there was no rape conviction the girl has never recanted the story leading to the charge.

    look i get that sometimes “kids will be kids” and i am not in favor of throwing every teenage boy that tries to get into a girls pants in jail, but this case is really not a fair example of that unless you think getting a couple of girls so drunk they are barely conscious and you and your buddies “partying” w/ her and taping it falls into that category–is genarlow wilson’s defender and champion really the hill you want to die on???

  13. Loren says:

    2 – Aggravated Child Molestation is one of several crimes whose sentences are specifically removed from the authority of the Parole Board to review and reduce. Check out OCGA 17-10-6.1

    Thanks, Comma Guy. I was pretty sure that was the case, but I didn’t want to post one thing I was certain about alongside something I was only moderately sure of.

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