5.25%

Isn’t democracy an amazing thing? Only 5.25% of voters in DeKalb County turned out to vote on the SPLOST and it passed with over 55% of the vote in Decatur and 70% in the county. So, 5.25% of the voting population has just bound 100% of the population to a tax extension.

BTW, here’s what someone sent in to the tip line on this:

Having the SPLOST vote any day of the year other than on a primary or general election day is cowardly, deceitful, dishonest and just plain wrong.

It’s clear and intentional voter suppresion, which is unacceptable for a county with such a high minority population that justifiably is angered when the Republican state house & senate try to pass bills that supress voter turnout, like their Voter ID bill.

If this vote was held on a primary or general election day, turnout would be tripled, quadrulped, or more. Educators are supposed to be role modelas, instead of sneaks who manipulate the system. I’m personally 50-50 of the merits of the SPLOST, but any adult can see that a mid-March vote is duplicitious.

Technorati Tags: SPLOST

18 comments

  1. Icarus says:

    I assumed from the headline that this was a post about the fed leaving interest rates unchanged. Wrong blog for that, I guess…

  2. Joy says:

    I always vote NO on SPLOSTs. I realize each time I do that I’m not going to be on the winning side.

    On a bitchy side note, my child’s Fulton Co. school advertised the SPLOST vote was in the Report Cards sent home last Friday. Not a seperate note from the school office. Printed in the upper left corner of the actual Report Card.

    Yeah, I know. It was for the children.

  3. Hey in all fairness, the people who put the SPLOST on the ballots were all elected in general and primary elections. You don’t like the SPLOST, vote against them.

  4. Joy says:

    I do vote against those people.
    Maybe I should just change my core beliefs, abandon reason, and go along with the podvoters.

  5. Loren says:

    Since 70% of the turnout in DeKalb voted in favor of the SPLOST, doesn’t that mean that just 3.675% of the voting population has bound 100% of the population to a tax extension?

  6. Trackboy1 says:

    “my child’s Fulton Co. school advertised the SPLOST vote was in the Report Cards sent home last Friday”

    If that’s not illegal, it should be. My Lord is that beyond unethical…

    “the people who put the SPLOST on the ballots were all elected in general and primary elections”

    chrisishardcore, those same people failed to publicize how the SPLOST was not just for a penny sales tax, but for bonds in the hundreds of millions, and in DeKalb, to pay for $91 mil from the previous SPLOST overruns.

    None of those elected officials mentioned stuff like this when they ran for office, or they would have lost. Not fair to say vote against them when most have been entrenched in office and don’t mention SPLOST stuff in their campaigns.
    However, now we know to hammer anyone who ever runs for any school board to publicly state their views, goals, etc. on any SPLOST from this point on.

  7. Decaturguy says:

    The City of Decatur did the same thing with a huge bond referendum last year. I voted yes on most (but not all) the bond proposals because I thought we needed most of the infrastructure improvements that were promised, and it was only going to raise property taxes by like $100 a year, but I thought the timing of the special election was a little underhanded.

  8. jsm says:

    Joy,

    Remember that if you don’t pass the SPLOST extension, the local government will get the money from you in property taxes. Then the local council or commission takes the heat for a tax increase. Nobody holds school boards accountable for their spending.

  9. jkga says:

    Although I voted for it, I agree with Erick and Decaturguy that it is ridiculous and anti-democratic to have special elections for this sort of referendum.

  10. Joy says:

    jsm,
    So I’m damned either way then? At least with the property taxes, the taxpayer gets the chance to see $$$ amount being bled from the wallet. People react to hundreds or thousands in a lump sum. A large enough leap might even spark a move toward accountability.
    The SPLOST is, as billed on my child’s report card, “Pennies for Prorgress”. How could anyone be so stingy to begrudge the schools mere pennies?
    It may just be pennies, but those are pennies I earned through my own efforts, and I have no inclination to send them to the county. I already spend almost half the year working for the various levels of government – how much more of my life until it’s finally enough?

  11. jsm says:

    Joy,

    Yes. You’re screwed either way. When is the last time you heard someone ask a school board candidate about his fiscal policy? I never have. Most people don’t even think about budget when voting for school board.

    If these people are going to be handed a blank check, I’d rather their free spending be funded by everyone who shops in the area–not just the property owners.

  12. Joy says:

    “If these people are going to be handed a blank check, I’d rather their free spending be funded by everyone who shops in the area–not just the property owners.”

    You’re kidding, right? The owners may write the check, but higher property taxes are reflected in rental prices. Small service and retail businesses have to adjust pricing to offset tax increases on their property. How are property taxes NOT paid by all?

  13. jsm says:

    Slow down a little, Joy. I said, ‘everyone who shops in the area.’ That includes people who don’t live there. And no, I’m not kidding.

  14. RuralDem says:

    I’d much rather have a SPLOST than have property taxes rise. I’m not familar with tax codes, however, in my county in order to finish paying off the school we just built two years ago it was either extend the SPLOST or raise property taxes.

    At least with a SPLOST everyone who comes through the county pitches in instead of just property owners.

    The date of special elections is outlined on the Secretary of State’s website. If the citizens who are against a proposal do not go out and vote, then who’s fault is that?

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