Come On Boys, Bring Your Wives and Kids Down To The Capitol Today, But Try To Avoid All Those “Fringe Groups” On Your Way Over Here

From a blog post by Rep. Steve Davis about Family Day at the Capitol last weekend: 

Today is the 17th legislative day of the session. It is called Family Day so that legislators can bring their wives and kids up for the day and show our family atmosphere. However I do not bring my family due to the spectacle presented by the fringe groups in front of our children. You have Labor Unions, “Working Families” wanting minimum wage increases, marches for racial equality, and the worst is GSLBT groups that try to prove they are families too(by exposing our young children to them kissing and holding hands). I will just say that I am very passionate about the issues but I did not get into politics to expose my children to adult issues. It is a shame that these groups try to exploit this event the way they do.

So, middle class working families who lobby their legislators are “fringe groups?”

Racial minorities who lobby their legislators are “fringe groups” as well? 

I guess Rep. Davis would rather leave the messy job of legislating to paid lobbyists and campaign contributors rather than common folks.  They wear suits and ties and look like they’ve got money, I guess.

Oh, and does someone want to give Rep. Davis a memo about how females can be in the General Assembly now?

105 comments

  1. LoyaltyIsMyHonor says:

    The funny thing is yesterday at the Senate Public Safety Committee, Sen Heath voted against a bill requiring seatbelt use in pickup trucks. The reason? He’s sick and tired of the government constantly imposing on our private lives. This of course comes from the same guy who amended the Female Genital Mutilation Bill, to prohibit women from piercing their genitals.

  2. CobbGOPer says:

    There is nothing wrong with lobbying your legislators, but doing so during a family event specifically so you can make them feel uncomfortable (apparently to the point that some legislators like Mr. Davis won’t even bring their families to the event) is in my opinion inappropriate, and only serves to polarize those very politicians even more against your cause.

    But I guess these groups have yet to grasp that concept. They hurt their causes through this action more than they helped.

  3. Skeptical says:

    So, just because my husband and I would want to bring our son to an event, it would make the poor widdle legislators unconfomfortable? My husband is a Teamster. We are a Labor family. Why do they hate our family so much?

    We pay our taxes. We don’t break any laws and yet the mere sight of us (and hell, we’re even white!) is enough to make the mighty GOPers shake in their family boots?

    Well CobbGOPer (and I expect this type of crap from you), that gold dome is not the sole property of the GOP. Like it or not, there are others in this state that don’t subscribe to your ridiculous, narrow view of what “family” means.

    I guess that it too grand of a concept for you to grasp.

  4. ColinATL says:

    I wonder what Rep. Davis thinks when Rep. Karla Drenner brings here wife & kids to the legislature on Family Day? Is she making an inappropriate spectacle unsuitable for children? Puh-lease? The man is a doofus, clearly.

    And explain to me how marching for working families and racial equality is somehow inappropriate for children? Are Rep. Davis’ children supposed to think that there is NO conflict at the state legislature? I’m confused about what he’s trying to keep his children from seeing.

    I agree with Decaturguy’s comments. Fat-cat lobbyists in suits & ties are appropriate family fare, but working or gay families are somehow inappropriate? Is he being obtuse?

  5. rightofcenter says:

    Okay, you all should get your panties out of a wad. Clearly, Rep. Davis isn’t the sharpest knife in the drawer to so inarticulately state his opinion, but I think he is right to the extent that folks show up just to make a political statement. There are plenty of other opportunities for folks to stage their own events to achieve their own political purposes rather than hijacking someone else’s event.

  6. I Am Jacks Post says:

    Skeptical, yeah, union protesters are generally quite civil individuals; throwing rocks, pipe bombs in the mailbox, vandalizing trucks during strikes, physical intimidation. And always in those satin jackets. Heck, I’d certainly feel comfortable taking all the kids from my neighborhood kids to a union rally.

    Honestly. Google “union violence”

  7. Skeptical says:

    rightofcenter,

    Everything that goes on under that dome is a political statement and these families are no better and no worse than that of Rep. Davis. Having people come to the capitol and ask their representative to raise the minimum wage so maybe families don’t have to work quite so hard is a bad thing? Well, you just have a nice time in that lovely little world you live in. Bless your heart.

  8. Decaturguy says:

    I think he is right to the extent that folks show up just to make a political statement.

    Then how come he didn’t mention some other “fringe groups” that were there?

    From this years family day event:

    Some half-dozen supporters of legislation outlawing abortion in Georgia gathered inside the House Judiciary Committee meeting room to urge members of that panel to hold a hearing on the measure.

    “The baby is a person, a human being, not a blob of tissue,” said the Rev. Alveda King, a niece of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., who became an anti-abortion activist after undergoing two abortions during the 1970s.

    Talk about exposing your children to “adult issues.” How come you didn’t mention these people as “fringe groups,” Rep. Davis?

  9. memberg says:

    Peaceful demonstrations of any kind should always be allowed at the Capitol (subject to some reasonable time/place/manner restrictions). There is probably no more appropriate place to hold a political demonstration in Georgia. Moreover, demonstrations should always be expected to coincide with special events at the Capitol. If a legislator decries such demonstrations, he or she is at best politically clueless and at worst a fascist. I think Rep. Davis has maybe a 99/1 split.

  10. CobbGOPer says:

    And again, there is such a thing as political timing. Like I said, you have every right to protest and/or lobby your legislators, but there is a right time and place. Instead of getting your message across to legislators like Mr. Davis, you just come off as angry jackasses looking to be obnoxious at every possible opportunity.

    Of course, maybe that’s what you want to do in the first place, but it doesn’t seem like effective activism to me, just a waste of time and resources.

    And Mrs. Skeptical, you can bite me. I didn’t say a thing about what I think “family” means, I merely pointed out that the timing of these particular demonstrations was probably not the most effective in getting their point across.

    Jumping to unfounded assumptions and accusations is another great way to get people to completely tune you out…

  11. Decaturguy says:

    What do you think about the appropriateness of the anti-abortion protesters who attended family day CobbGOPer?

  12. jsm says:

    Ya know, it’s awkward to see people kissing and hugging in public no matter what their sexual orientation may be. I wouldn’t bring children to see that if it were hetero teens lobbying for back seat lovemaking in state parks.

    All the guy is saying is that he doesn’t want to expose his wife and kids to the tension created by all the demonstrations on a day that was meant to be a fun time for the family. He has a right to shelter his family from anything he chooses.

    I agree with rightofcenter. Loosen up.

  13. Decaturguy says:

    I should add that this is not intended to be just a “family day” event for legislators and their families, it is intended for familes all across the state who may not otherwise have a chance to get to the Capitol during the week, to see the legislature in progress.

  14. GAWire says:

    DG,

    Yes, it is true, women are allowed in the General Assembly now … who else is going to do the office work while the interns are gazing in the rotunda!

    (was that sexist?)

  15. CobbGOPer says:

    And to be honest with you, I think there are much more effective methods of activism than standing outside someone’s office chanting and screaming like a lunatic.

  16. Decaturguy says:

    Who was chanting and screaming like a lunatic? It must have been the anti-abortion folks, because from what I experienced in 2005, once inside the building everyone was on their best behavior.

  17. Rusty says:

    And to be honest with you CobbGOPer, I think that’s stupid. I mean, if you can’t make a political statement at the Capitol, where can you make it? In the privacy of your own home where no one is listening?

  18. Amber says:

    Clearly, Rep. Davis isn’t the sharpest knife in the drawer to so inarticulately state his opinion, but I think he is right to the extent that folks show up just to make a political statement.

    It isn’t appropriate to make a political statement at the Capitol?

    *stares*

    *blinks*

    What??

    So, where IS it appropriate?

  19. CobbGOPer says:

    Sorry, I guess I have to be more literal for you Teamsters: old-fashioned ’60’s style “Hell no we won’t go” protests are probably the least effective form of activism if your goal is to actually influence policy in a significant fashion.

    Unless you’re bringing 100,000 people to the Gold Dome, no one will care.

  20. Decaturguy says:

    “protests are probably the least effective form of activism if your goal is to actually influence policy in a significant fashion.”

    I would agree that in general protests do not directly result in changing policy. However, protests are sometimes the only way to get the medias attention. Would there have stories in all of the major papers on Sunday about workers calling for a minimum wage increase if they had not shown up? No.

    It is also a way for average people with little individual political power to show their power in numbers. If there are 500 people down at the Capitol with Teamsters (to use your example) pins on their shirts, people do notice.

  21. Jason Pye says:

    I’d have to disagree with Davis on the fringe group comment, myself being a member of what is considered to be a “fringe group.”

    But I don’t agree with groups that want to raise the minimum wage, nor do I support affirmative action programs (I assume that this is what he was referring to).

  22. Rusty says:

    Effectiveness and appropriateness are two different things. This statement:

    Again, I think it was the wrong place for protests of any kind, pro, anti, wacko, whatever.

    …implies you believe the protests to be inappropriate. There couldn’t possibly be a more appropriate place for a protest than the state Capitol.

  23. CobbGOPer says:

    And here’s my suggestion for you:

    Instead of wasting your time in silly protest marches, you need to focus your efforts on getting people elected who agree with your positions. The only polls that matter are the ones on Election Day, and those are the only ones politicians pay attention to.

  24. Jason Pye says:

    Instead of wasting your time in silly protest marches, you need to focus your efforts on getting people elected who agree with your positions. The only polls that matter are the ones on Election Day, and those are the only ones politicians pay attention to.

    Great points.

  25. DutchDawg says:

    Nobody cares about “demonstrations” except the the “demonstrators.” Grandstanders. If they want to change things, why not organize a grass-roots campaign effort? Oh, that’s right, there isn’t a sufficient electorate to carry their extreme messages. Mob-rule never works.

  26. Rusty says:

    Instead of wasting your time in silly protest marches, you need to focus your efforts on getting people elected who agree with your positions. The only polls that matter are the ones on Election Day, and those are the only ones politicians pay attention to.

    Again, focusing on effectiveness and ignoring your stupid appropriateness comment from earlier.

    I suggest you get used to seeing those faces at the Capitol, because they aren’t going away no matter how unpleasant or rude you think they are. And I’ll refer you to Decaturguy’s comment above regarding effectiveness.

  27. memberg says:

    This whole thing reminds me of back in ’01, when an Islamic Institute e-mail alerted its readers that “there will be a march and rally in front of the White House in Washington, D.C., to protest Israel’s aggression.”

  28. Decaturguy says:

    If you think that constituents going down the the Capitol on their day off to talk to their representatives about an issue that is important to them is ineffective, then you are nuts.

  29. CobbGOPer says:

    And I’ll refer you to the election day polls that placed Republicans in the solid majority of both houses of the legislature, as well as the Governor’s office, the Lt. Governor’s office, the Insurance commissioner, the SecState, the State School Superintendent…

    Are you noticing a theme here? So you brought 500 people to stamp their feet outside the Capitol. So what. You need to start bringing people to the polling booths if you want action on your issues.

  30. Rusty says:

    And I’d refer you to pretty much every other state where Republicans just had their asses handed to them.

    If your goal was to deflect attention from the inherent bigotry of Steve Davis’ blog statement, then you’ve succeeded to this point. So, good job on that.

  31. CobbGOPer says:

    I never said anything about his statements. What I’m telling you is that if you don’t like it, then you need to get someone else elected instead of whining and pointing fingers. We aren’t talking about other states, we’re talking about this one.

  32. Rusty says:

    I never said anything about his statements.

    Exactly. Your goal appears to have been to deflect attention from the original topic, which was the inherent bigotry of Steve Davis’ blog statement.

  33. rightofcenter says:

    Peace and love, brothers and sisters.
    The fringe groups and the non-fringe groups all have a right to picnic, protest, and generally pursue happiness (although I must agree that any kissing more involved than a peck at a “family” outing seems rather ridiculous). And Rep. Davis certainly has the right to not take his family to such an activity if he doesn’t think it is appropriate for them (and I’d like to see the dictionary where that would make him a fascist).

    Kum ba ya.

  34. CobbGOPer says:

    That wasn’t my intention, my comments were directed at the protests that sparked Mr. Davis’s comments. I don’t defend them at all. But he can say whatever he wants as long as he keeps getting re-elected.

    You’re sidestepping the fact that if you don’t project your power at the polling booth, then politicians don’t care what you have to say.

  35. Decaturguy says:

    I’m not the thought police, but if you are a public figure and you are, in a public forum, going to make assinine statements like Davis did, I’m certainly going to let people know about it.

    It is just my little way of ruining his credibility.

  36. DutchDawg says:

    Interesting choice Decaturguy. Judging by their statements, I would think that someone who would be amazed that Obama is “clean and articulate” for a black guy is much more racist than someone who doesn’t want his family harrassed by mean-spirited crowds. That’s just me though.

  37. DutchDawg says:

    Ruining his credibility? Steve is no genius, but…I’m not sure this will be on Drudge tomorrow either…

  38. Amber says:

    Instead of wasting your time in silly protest marches, you need to focus your efforts on getting people elected who agree with your positions. The only polls that matter are the ones on Election Day, and those are the only ones politicians pay attention to.

    Who is the “you” in this statement?

  39. Decaturguy says:

    I love it that even his supporters thinks he’s an idiot. And from what I hear, not a real master of fiscal responsibility either.

  40. Rusty says:

    It’s more than poor communication skills. It’s profoundly bigoted. As in, “it’s been a while since I’ve seen someone pack that much bigotry into such a small space” bigoted.

  41. Amber says:

    Not a Davis supporter, but also don’t think he should be crucified over poor communiciation skills

    To what standard should constituents hold our elected officials accountable?

  42. Decaturguy says:

    If his communication skills are so poor, maybe he should have rethought that blog idea. Or trying to tell the State how it should spend its money.

  43. Decaturguy says:

    It’s more than poor communication skills. It’s profoundly bigoted. As in, “it’s been a while since I’ve seen someone pack that much bigotry into such a small space” bigoted.

    I agree, he makes Biden look like a lightweight bigot.

  44. CobbGOPer says:

    You’re nitpicking about the “you,” but it applies to anyone. And if you can’t see the logic of my argument in that statement about Election Day being the only poll that matters, then it’s no wonder Democrats are in the minority in this state, Amber, if in fact you are a Democrat.

    And I’m no Davis supporter or fan, but referencing the earlier point: if you don’t like him, you need to vote him out.

  45. CobbGOPer says:

    And if you don’t have the votes to get him out, then stop bitching and go do some grassroots campaigning.

  46. Rusty says:

    Reporters love Google, and political reporters in Georgia read Peach Pundit. So, bitching on the Internet about a racist, sexist bigot like Steve Davis is a small way those of us with jobs and lives to attend to that take up most of our time can contribute.

  47. CobbGOPer says:

    Reporters are lazy, and I bet you a crisp Benjamin this doesn’t make it to print, not even in the Henry Daily Herald.

  48. CobbGOPer says:

    I mean, Davis has had this insipid blog for how long now? Does any of his bloviation make it into print regularly?

  49. Decaturguy says:

    Yall go have a nice Valentines Day. I’m going to prepare a nice dinner with my “fringe group” partner of mine if he would ever get home from that respectable job that he has and pays a lot of Georgia income tax on.

  50. Rusty says:

    Maybe not this time. But every so often they do. Regardless, you telling people not to bitch is only going to turn up the volume of said bitching.

    And I’d bet you a crisp Benjamin you’re a last word freak who will add another snide remark just because you can’t stand for someone else to have the last word.

  51. Decaturguy says:

    CobbGOPer,

    Does it bother you that in about 10-15 years, CobbGOPer is going to sound a lot like DekalbGOPer would today?

  52. HeartofGa says:

    “Insipid.” That pretty well describes it. Part of motivating people to go to the polls is educating them about the nonsense some of these elected officials, like Davis, spew. People talk about what elected officials do and say. Blogs like this-and his-are a part of the microscope folks sign up for when they run for office.

  53. Amber says:

    You’re nitpicking about the “you,” but it applies to anyone. And if you can’t see the logic of my argument in that statement about Election Day being the only poll that matters, then it’s no wonder Democrats are in the minority in this state, Amber, if in fact you are a Democrat.

    Oh FFS, CobbCOPer! I asked a question. Nice way of not answering it and practicing some choice insults that sent my mind reeling back to 5th grade.

    Whew! Wow.

  54. Decaturguy says:

    Part of the reason CobbGOPer will be a relic in 10-15 years is because the Republican Party allows guys like Davis to define their party and that one play well in Cobb County circa 2015. I will continue to try to expose these guys for who they really are.

    Ironically, CobbGOPer, all of the white folks will have moved back to Dekalb and Fulton, by then, huh?

  55. Wow! I missed a lot today. I am sorry I offended anyone, but as a parent I will not subject my children to protests. And yes this would include protest in which one would show pictures of aborted babies or any other issues that are of mature matters.

    I never said these people dont have the right to protest!!!! This is every Georgians Capitol and they can do as they please, within the law.

    These comments were not about me being exposed but rather my kids. And I hope we can all agree, it is definitely my right to decide what my children are exposed too!

    And to make a point.

    I do not support the minimum wage.
    I do not support affirmative action or the VRA.
    I do not support gay marriage.
    I do not support commuter rail.

    Color me what you will.

    Happy Valentines Day, Love Steve.

  56. Icarus says:

    Rep. Davis,

    You didn’t respond to perhaps the worst insult of all:

    B. Steve Davis R-Fayetteville

    Fayetteville? I guess anything south of I-20 is all the same if you live in Decatur…

  57. Will Hinton says:

    CobbGOPer: you constant drumbeat of the election is the only poll that counts is completely bogus. That would be fine except that here in Georgia, we don’t have choices. Many of the “fringe groups” that you mention are not allowed on the ballot in Georgia. Only those with a (D) or an (R) are allowed. So the idea that everyone has a choice as to who they would like to vote for is complete nonsense.

  58. Adam Fogle says:

    Many of the “fringe groups” that you mention are not allowed on the ballot in Georgia.

    They’re allowed, it’s just that nobody votes for them and few of them can meet the required number of petition signatures to make the ballot… which makes sense because otherwise they wouldn’t be on the “fringe,” now would they?

    Only those with a (D) or an (R) are allowed. So the idea that everyone has a choice as to who they would like to vote for is complete nonsense.

    Wrong, but I see what you’re implying here. If you want strong and electable third, fourth, or twenty-fifth party candidates, go live in Canada or Britain or some parliamentary system.

    You see, here in America, when a strong “fringe” group gains enough attention, it becomes mainstream and no longer “fringe.” And, with enough popularity, the group gets sucked into one of the two parties.

    Love it or not, good or bad, America has politically evolved into a two-party system. Complain all you want, but it is what it is.

  59. Rusty says:

    Adam,
    Georgia has some of the most restrictive ballot access laws in the nation (put in place by Democrats before the Democrats became the Republicans here, no less). It may be technically true that a third party can get on a ballot here, but it’s damn difficult.

    Rep. Davis,
    Maybe you are just that oblivious and that poor a writer, and maybe there comes a point where my point has been made and it’s time to move on, but thanks for not addressing the original issue this thread brought up at all.

    And you further reveal the extent of your bigotry with this statement:

    These comments were not about me being exposed but rather my kids.

    Exposed. Exposed to what? Exposure is a word used to talk about disease. Do you think the negroes have diseases?

  60. Will Hinton says:

    Adam: you couldn’t be more off-base in your comments. For some reason, you are assuming that ballot access laws are the same across the country. They are not. Georgia is far and away the most restrictive state. I shouldn’t have to go to Canada or UK in order to vote for someone other than a D or an R. I know that I can go to other states, so why not Georgia.

    And once again, in essence, 3rd parties are NOT allowed on the ballot. Please tell me the last time a third party or independent got on the ballot!

  61. CobbGOPer says:

    Seems to me like the Libertarians get on the ballot here all the time lately…

    Or maybe I was just dreaming when Garrett Michael Hayes participated in the gubernatorial debates last year…

  62. Amber says:

    And to make a point.

    I do not support the minimum wage.
    I do not support affirmative action or the VRA.
    I do not support gay marriage.
    I do not support commuter rail.

    Rep. Davis,
    What do you support?

  63. jsm says:

    “Exposure is a word used to talk about disease. ”

    Not always. Exposure is often used regarding good things–the arts, other cultures, charity work, etc. You’re really working hard to make Rep. Davis’s comments more than they are.

    Rusty, re-read his actual comments and try to find where he said fringe groups are bad or that their demonstrations should not be allowed. It’s not there, yet you call him a “racist, sexist bigot” among other things. With your English degree and journalism background, you should be able to break down written English better than that. All he was saying is that he wanted to shield his family from demonstrations by various groups and what he considers adult issues. How does that warrant the name calling he has endured here?

  64. Amber says:

    Rusty, re-read his actual comments and try to find where he said fringe groups are bad or that their demonstrations should not be allowed.

    People don’t have to actually come right out and use those exact words to be offensive. In fact, they rarely do. History should tell you that.

  65. Rusty says:

    griftdrift,
    Excellent suggestion.

    jsm,
    You and many others on this thread are working hard to write off his bigotry as ignorance and/or a parental decision. Won’t fly.

  66. jsm says:

    You guys have read so deeply into Davis’ statements and passed such harsh judgment on fabricated prejudice that you can’t back out of it. Amazing.

  67. Rusty says:

    jsm,
    Care to explain what you even mean by “fabricated predjudice”? Just because you say something is fabricated doesn’t make it so. Do we need to get into hypotheticals involving your mother again? Rep. Davis’ statement was loaded to the gills with bigoted language. He is a disgrace to his office, and your attempts to defend him are disgraceful.

  68. Erick says:

    Rusty,
    It’s just not cool to drag someone’s mother into the argument. That’s uncalled for.

    And full disclosure, I agree with Rep. Davis.

  69. Decaturguy says:

    Erick,

    Rep. Davis said that “family day” was a day that legislators bring their wives and kids to see what they do in Atlanta as if it were 1912 and there were no females with husbands in the legislature.

    He then proceeds to call any number of ordinary citizens “fringe groups” and degrades their right to participate in family day.

    And you argree with the moron?

  70. jsm says:

    Decatur, isn’t that being a little touchy? I think treating the “wives” reference as a deliberate comment against female legislators is a stretch.

  71. Amber says:

    You guys have read so deeply into Davis’ statements and passed such harsh judgment on fabricated prejudice that you can’t back out of it. Amazing.

    Well, here’s the thing, jsm… people who aren’t offended by something don’t get to decide whether or not it’s offensive to anybody. “I am offended by this because…” (which has been demonstrated on this thread) cannot reasonably be followed by “nuh-uh!!!” That’s not how communication works. That’s not how discourse works. It’s how something works, and I can think of two letters that represent that something.

    Examples of the bigoted language? I believe those are in the post itself, in Re. Davis’s quote, particularly the bold portions. I’m not sure what you’re grasping for here.

  72. Amber says:

    It’s just not cool to drag someone’s mother into the argument. That’s uncalled for.

    That is perhaps true. But I guess when it’s “fringe groups” like working-class families, people of color, and OMG TEH GAYZ!!1! then it’s a-okay, full speed ahead.

  73. Erick says:

    Amber, it wouldn’t be right in that case either.

    Decaturguy, I skimmed the statement. It should have legitimately been “spouses.”

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