I Thought The GOP Believed in Local Government

I thought that was part of the GOP mantra — the government closest to you is the government that functions the best. So, you know, the GOP has always tried to devolve education issues from the federal government to the state government and from there to the local government.

So, if you ask me, Rep. Clay Cox is acting like a Democrat with this H.B. 13 proposal, which takes salary decisions for school superintendents out of the hands of local boards of education. You’d think that the local school boards would pay what they needed to pay for the best they could get and if the voters did not like it, they could respond.

But apparently Rep. Cox doesn’t seem to think that local control of the most mundane of decisions for a local school board is the best idea. Should the state start setting hard standards on county commissioners’ pay? Should the state start setting standards on what counties can pay their county attorneys? What about trash collectors?

Let’s do a salary freeze across the board.

And then, since we can’t trust local boards of education to make competent salary decisions, I’d like a state law that requires the voters to both propose and approve state legislators’ salaries. Surely we cannot trust them to make the appropriate decision on their own pay if we can’t trust local school boards to make decisions about superintendents. And the difference is that the School Super can’t vote on his or her pay, but Rep. Cox can vote on his.

Come on Clay. I don’t mean to give you a hard time on this. But it’s not very Republican and it’s also a bad idea.

8 comments

  1. rightbeforeleft says:

    I don’t necessarily want to argue with Erick on this, but there are superintendents that are making more than $300,000 to steward underperforming school districts. When a superintendent has the school board in their pocket, there is no limit to how high the contract can get. That said, I’m not sure a statewide limit is the solution, but something has to be done.

  2. Jmac says:

    Honest question Erick … are you disappointed in the GOP leadership this General Assembly? Seems to me that there’s been a considerable amount of proposed and/or discussed legislation that would conflict with traditional GOP philosophy (i.e. Sunday Sales, banning transfats, banning cell phones for 18-and-under in cars, superintendent pay, etc.).

    I would disagree a bit about Cox ‘acting like a Democrat.’ We’ve got some nuance here and there, and it ain’t always cookie-cutter ideological stereotypes.

  3. Trackboy1 says:

    Speaking of stupid ideas:
    http://www.atlantamagazine.com/blogs/entry.php?id=659

    GDOT head Harold Linnekohl, and GDOT Bd. members Mike Evans and David Doss are true prostitutues/lackeys for road building interests! $5 billion for a f-ing tunnel? And it would probably cost double when all is said and done. And don’t expect a dime from the Fed’s…it would all come from GA taxpayers. They won’t spend $100 mil of fed money for the Lovejoy train, but over $5 bil of GA taxpayer money is great if it helps their road building buddies.

  4. joe says:

    “I thought that was part of the GOP mantra — the government closest to you is the government that functions the best. So, you know, the GOP has always tried to devolve education issues from the federal government to the state government and from there to the local government.”

    “Westmoreland spoke about how, in his view, the National GOP has lost it’s way. This abandonment of principle led to the defeat at the hands of the Democrat this past November. To prove his point, the Congressman mentioned how the Contract With America called for the elimination of the Federal Department of Education. However, George Bush has greatly increased it’s budget and gave it greater powers through the No Child Left Behind Act. ”

    Now you tell me why I don’t vote GOP anymore!

  5. whoknowz says:

    Since becoming the majority, it has been increasingly obvious that the local control mantra was a strategy used when in the minority not a philosophy of the party.

    As to the salaries, there are some amazingly high ones. Two things though:
    1) For our government to work, we must let the voters rule. Too many of them do not participate, but that is their right. When voters don’t like something enough they will run for office themselves or vote for a diferent candidate. They can certainly make their feelings known in a number of ways.
    2) If we believe in a market economy, why would we set an artificail limit on this? I thought we wanted public schools to work like a business.

  6. Mad Dog says:

    Erick,

    Grow a pair and GIVE HIM A HARD TIME!

    Or, change your name to Charlie Brown.

    LMAO

    “Stand for something or you’ll fall for anything.”

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