Reason Foundation speaks to Legislators on transportation.

Robert Poole of the Reason Foundation spoke Wednesday to members of the Georgia Legislature. He made several recommendations on how to improve traffic in metro Atlanta. From the January 31st edition of ‘Lawmakers.’

10 comments

  1. Overincorporated Fulton says:

    I challenge fellow Peach Punditers to explain to me how this is a good idea. No matter how much you mince his words, this guy is recommending we build our way out of traffic with the same recipe that got us exactly where we are today…MORE ROADS.

    A deep-bore tunnel underneath Buckhead and Midtown? Elevated toll lanes about the entire northside expressway network? The ten year construction nightmare alone is reason enough to cast this ideologically unhinged “Reason” aside with the derision it most assuredly deserves.

  2. buzzbrockway says:

    Perhaps some of the ideas put forward by Reason are not practical, but so is the idea that building only trains and bike paths will solve our problem.

    What Poole did was study Atlanta’s current situation and recommend solutions that have worked in other places. How crazy is that?

  3. Demonbeck says:

    Not being an Atlanta resident, I cannot answer this question, but do they currently give incentives for carpooling or using mass transportation? Does Atlanta have designated carpool lots?

    Adding additional HOV lanes throughout the city would help, but you would also have to improve MARTA considerably at the same time.

    DC has some of the worst traffic in the US as well, but they have one of the best mass transit systems. Their road system sucks, unlike Atlanta’s. Over there, though, proximity to DC Metro increases the price of your home. In Atlanta, it’s the opposite.

    I truly believe that if Atlanta were to improve MARTA, a good amount of the problem would be solved. But that would entail a comprehensive restructuring of the folks making decisions for MARTA.

  4. TM2000 says:

    The HOV lanes are a definite. I believe that roads and transit both play a pivotal role in this issue.
    DC has reversible HOV lanes that are separated by barricade from the rest of the traffic and have gated entry to reduce cheating.
    The tunnel, what can I say, I love subterranean projects because they do the least damage to neighborhoods and ecology, and anything that separates trucks from regular traffic is high on my list because I have had some close encounters with trucks.

  5. bird says:

    MARTA is actually doing a lot better in the management department. Ridership is up somewhere near 13%, they are reducing the surcharges on the Braves and Six Flags shuttle, and they are replacing their big buses with smaller buses to match ridership and increase routes (short bus jokes notwithstanding).

    but, MARTA just doesn’t go to enough locations for me to be able to effectively use it. That needs to be done, but putting in more locations requires more than good management on the part of MARTA, it requires a regional effort.

  6. Decaturguy says:

    Over there, though, proximity to DC Metro increases the price of your home. In Atlanta, it’s the opposite.

    That’s not really true. There are lots and lots of new condo developments being built throughout Atlanta due to their proximity to a MARTA station.

  7. Overincorporated Fulton says:

    Buzz, you can’t defend what this guy is saying so you come at me with vegetable oil?

    Do whatever you have to do at MARTA to get planning and new construction on the fast track. As ridership increases, lower the fares. Make it go where we go…all over!

    Pay for it by putting an inbound toll on every major highway entering the Perimeter. Say…one dollar. Don’t worry about Georgia 400 though, it’s already in place. We’ve been paying it for years. It’s a lovely disincentive to going downtown.

    The demand is there for transportation alternatives. A toll lane is not an alternative. That is more of the same.

  8. buzzbrockway says:

    I did defend what he said when I said:

    What Poole did was study Atlanta’s current situation and recommend solutions that have worked in other places. How crazy is that?

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