Cagle proposes expansion of Charter Schools

Here’s a video clip from ‘Lawmakers’ of Lt. Governor Cagle and Education Superintendent Kathy Cox talking about Cagle’s proposal.

Here’s more on Cagle’s proposal, and here’s what the Georgia Public Policy Foundation says about Charter Schools:

Taken as a whole, the Annual Report provides compelling evidence that charter schools in Georgia are succeeding. In 2006, charter schools in Georgia met state testing goals – or made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) – at a rate that exceeded traditional public schools. In 2006, fully 87.8 percent of Georgia charter schools made AYP, compared to 78.7 percent of traditional public schools.

Charter high school graduation rates also exceed the rates of traditional public high schools, as demonstrated in the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT). In all four content areas – Social Studies, English/Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science – charter school student performance exceeded the performance of traditional public school students. For instance, on the Social Studies section of the GHSGT, 92 percent of charter school students met or exceeded expectations, versus 86 percent of traditional public school students. Likewise, on the Science section of the GHSGT, 87 percent of charter school students met or exceeded expectations, compared with 73 percent for traditional public school students.

These numbers are even more impressive when one looks at the trend data over time. In 2004, for instance, only 60 percent of charter schools students passed the Social Studies section of the GHSGT, compared to 82 percent of traditional public school students. While traditional public school student performance remained relatively stable over the subsequent two-year period, charter school student performance increased dramatically, to a 92 percent pass rate.

This trend repeated itself in each subject area. In 2004, charter school students scored lower than traditional public school students on every content area of the GHSGT. By 2006, that had completely reversed and now charter school students score higher.

Georgia needs more Charter Schools and Cagle’s proposal will help accomplish that.

10 comments

  1. Effective commonsense leadership. This leadership team that was elected in November is proving to move Georgia in the right direction.

    Do what you say you’re going to do. What a novel concept!

  2. Mad Dog says:

    Maurice,

    You tend to over generalize.

    “Because charter schools vary as widely as traditional public schools, their academic achievement also varies widely. It is difficult — not to mention scientifically invalid — to make blanket comparisons of charter schools to traditional public schools. However, because charter schools promise to improve student achievement as a condition of relief from some of the rules and regulations that apply to traditional public schools, it is appropriate to evaluate their effectiveness.

    In 2004, the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB) released an analysis of charter school performance on the 2003 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), also known as “The Nation’s Report Card.” The report found that charter school students, on average, score lower than students in traditional public schools. While there was no measurable difference between charter school students and students in traditional public schools in the same racial/ethnic subgroup, charter school students who were eligible for free or reduced-price lunch scored lower than their peers in traditional public schools, and charter school students in central cities scored lower than their peers in math in 4th grade.”

  3. Mad Dog says:

    Did anyone mention the huge number of charter schools in the state of Georgia?

    17

    Kind of hard for me to feel the excitement when the data is generated by only 17 schools.

    That’s why I set out a little national data.

    For a program started in 1993, 17 schools is a humble success story, at best.

  4. Mad Dog says:

    “Because charter schools vary as widely as traditional public schools, their academic achievement also varies widely. It is difficult — not to mention scientifically invalid — to make blanket comparisons of charter schools to traditional public schools.”

    And this excites you?

    Scientifically invalid to make … comparisons of charter schools to traditional public schools.

    The deficiencies seems to be in Cagle and you, Maurice.

  5. GOPeach says:

    I have learned to look at Casey
    without rolling my eyes but will
    someone please tell him not to
    grin with that wild mad scientist
    grin…. it’s creepy.

  6. Mad Dog says:

    Truth Filter,

    If you’re right, I stand corrected. I was using the information from Georgia Public Policy Foundation. And, I quote that information, “Moreover, given the relatively small number of charter high schools – 17 – in the state, the significance of these trends should not be overstated.”

    So Cagle is using bad information or he is not using the figures from the Georgia Public Policy Foundation?

    Which is it?

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