More on Senator Shafer’s Blog

We’ve blogrolled it. I think it is a great idea to get state legislators blogging themselves — as opposed to campaign blogs.

The odds go up when a politician is blogging directly that he will say something frank and honest instead of boring talking points and spin.

10 comments

  1. buzzbrockway says:

    Kudos to Shafer. Politicians should embrace blogs and the new media IMHO. With cell phone cameras, audio and video recorders etc… very little a politician says is private anymore so embrace this brave new world and make the best of it.

  2. Chris says:

    I think the best thing an elected offical can do is communicate with their constitutents, and a blog is a great way to do it. First, it bypasses the media and allows information to get out in more than 4.5 second soundbites. Second it provides a forum for constituent feedback. Third its darn cheap – the tax payers don’t have to pick up any franking expenses.

    Kudos to David Shafer, Steve Davis, Jack Kingston and John Douglas.

  3. VictoratGaImproper says:

    Erick,

    Thanks for the Link to David’s site. I had to post this under the most popular “Deer Baiting Debate” on his site. Would you consider starting a topic about Health Insurance Issues in Georgia here on Peach Pundit?
    thanks,
    Vic

    VictoratGaImproper
    January 3rd, 2007 at 1:10 pm
    1/3/06
    To: Sen David Schafer
    David,

    Can’t we make better use of our time and show some respect for the citizens of Georgia who are overwhelmed with Health Insurance Rate increases by re-introducing Senate Bill 509 and getting House support from Tom Knox who introduced similar legislation (HB1517) at the last minute, last year?

    I’ve gotten support on both sides of the aisle from the mid Ga delegation for 509. Thanks for introducing it last year. Let’s try a little harder this time?

    Senate Bill 509

    “Health Insurance Competition and Rate Relief Act of 2006.”

    http://www.legis.state.ga.us/legis/2005_06//versions/sb509_As_introduced_LC_28_2823_2.htm
    06 LC 28 2823
    By: Senator Shafer of the 48th

    Thanks,
    Victor Jones,
    Macon, Ga.
    http://www.macon-bibb.com/GONZO

  4. Faye says:

    Yes, as someone who visits the blogosphere regularly, I too was pleased to find Senator Shafer’s blog.

    So on Febr 1st, I proceeded to compliment him on pursueing increased availability to Georgians of umbilical cord blood treatments, and added to that with a comment on the bi-partisan support of embryonic stem cell research. However I was disappointed that my comment still has not appeared on his blog …….

    Here it is again:

    I applaud State Senator Shafer for expanding umbilical cord blood stem cell use for folks like Keonne Penn and others who suffer blood-related conditions that can be cured with UBC stem cells.
    However I am concerned that 70% of Georgians are not being listened to, many of whom have other than a blood-related conditions, and are desperately waiting for their state to fund embryonic stem cell research.

    It’s a fact that 80 Nobel Laureates wrote a letter to president Bush in 2001 urging him to allow for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research, because it holds the best promise for curative treatments for a host of different conditions. Who are we to second guess them?

    Six years later, the public is well aware that the cells used for ESCR, are cells that are thrown out in the trash at in vitro fertilization clinics because they were never implanted in a woman. Pure and simple, it’s a matter of recycling already discarded cells, much like we want to recycle the umbilical cord blood cells.

    Though our family already has umbilical cord blood stem cells cry-preserved (frozen), and we also have placental stem cells as well as bone marrow stem cell cryo-preserved for my son, these cells will remain frozen and unused because they haven’t been found to be particularly useful to get my son walking again.

    It’s a misleading to believe that any of these stem cells have allowed anyone to walk again. One or two people getting slight improvement from their previous condition, does make a cure.

    As Nancy Reagan has said on this issue a few years back: “We have lost too much time already”

  5. Bill Simon says:

    So, Faye, perhaps we should also stop trying to find a cure for cancer in all of its varying forms. Lots of time has been spent on that endeavor, and no cure has ever been found. More time has been spent on that research than stem-cells from embryo research.

  6. Faye says:

    Bill, we should do both:
    1. fund embryonic stem cell research
    2. fund adult stem cell research

    For some conditions such as sickle cell disease, adult stem cells will be more appropriate…….It’s not a one size fits all situation.

    University of Georgia research scientist Steve Stice: Embryonic cells have appeared more effective in treating spinal-cord injuries

    Stice is working with U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., to get Congress to approve new embryonic lines because the existing ones are aging and beginning to change.

  7. Faye says:

    Bill just to clarify……I strongly support embryonic stem cell research which I gather you too support.

    Shafer however feels that umbilical cord stem cells will provide the “one size fits all solution” to all kinds of medical conditions. It’s however a fact that umbilical cord blood stem cells are best suited for blood-related conditions only.

    Shafer actually opposes embryonic stem cell research, even though this research appears to be better suited for finding cures for neurological conditions. And I feel the cells would be disposed of anyway, so why not put them to good use?

    Adelman supports funding both adult stem cell research as well as embryonic stem cell research,……….. funny thing is I just checked his blog off the link provided on peachpundit and noticed he blogged on it just today.

    Bill, people like you and I, who support embryonic stem cell research should make sure this doesn’t become a partisan issue. It’s too important to be held up by partisan politics and really should be a health issue that affects us all.

    Fortunately it’s viewed as a bi-partisan issue by most folks in the general public.

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