Could it get any Worse?

The much blogged about shooting death of a 92 88 year old woman (c.f. 1, 2 &c.) seems to be turning into an even uglier story:

An informant who narcotics officers say led them to the house where an elderly woman was killed in a drug raid is accusing the officers of asking him to lie about his role, Atlanta police Chief Richard Pennington said Monday.

“The informant said he had no knowledge of going into that house and purchasing drugs,” [Atlanta Police Chief Richard] Pennington said. “We don’t know if he’s telling the truth.”

I think it is prudent to withhold judgment  as we don’t know if this is the truth. However–well I shall withhold comment too.

Also; worth pondering is how Mayor Franklin is going to respond. She could save perhaps a modicum iota of respectability by dealing with this execration well.

NB: I wonder, just by looking at this, if John Eaves will have any co-operation in his first two years from Republicans, either on his commission, or in the General Assembly

7 comments

  1. atlantaman says:

    Either it was a mistake or someone told the police it was a crack house.

    What incentive would the police have to knowingly break into an innocent 88 year old woman’s home?

  2. ColinATL says:

    My guess is that the police officers just chose the wrong house and asked/told the informant to cover their asses after the fact. Just my guess. I don’t hate cops at all, but incompetence that leads to a death should be prosecuted, especially if there was an attempt to cover it up.

    These guys were plain clothes officers who broke down the door. Given the neighborhood, it’s no wonder the lady started shooting.

  3. atlantaman says:

    Once again I know all the facts are not in, but that seems to be the biggest problem I have – why were the officers wearing plain clothes?

  4. DougieFresh says:

    Why are we breaking into homes with weapons drawn for a crime that at it’s core only effects the user? I say let the cops fry. You decide to use thug tactics, pay the consequences. Police do not have to operate in this fashion.

  5. atlantaman says:

    In fairness Dougie, whether you agree with criminalizing drug use or not, it’s not the cops job to set that priority. I don’t think anyone can dispute that some of the people associated with that trade are some of the most dangerous and ruthless people in this country. You can’t expect the Police to fight this battle with squirt guns. It sounds like what happened was a horrendous mistake, but you have to remember that at the time the Police thought it was a drug dealer in the residence.

    Take a step back for a minute a remember the APD is very busy and their is no incentive for them to start arbitrarily bashing down the doors of innocent 88 year old women.

  6. DougieFresh says:

    atlantaman,

    but criminal prosecution would prevent mistakes that lead to the death of frightened elderly women.

    I make mistakes when driving, like exceeding the speed limit not watching my speedometer closely enough. Will the police let me off because I was busy finding a radio station?

    If the police are absolutely sure this tactic is called for, then they should be willing to assume the risks associated with it if they are wrong.

    Executions are for the courts. If people were breaking into my home unannounced in a bad neighborhood, and I had a gun handy, you better believe I would make sure a few round found a target.

  7. atlantaman says:

    “but criminal prosecution would prevent mistakes that lead to the death of frightened elderly women. I make mistakes when driving, like exceeding the speed limit not watching my speedometer closely enough. Will the police let me off because I was busy finding a radio station?”

    Look, I think it was an awful mistake and there needs to be a full investigation. But you are not making fair comparisions. If you start criminal prosecutions of police officers for a very rare and innocent mistake, then you’re going to make sure the people who apply to be cops are the worst of the worst. What incentive would anyone with half a brain have to work a job with incredibly low pay, you risk your life on a daily basis and now work under constant fear of criminal prosecution ? Especially in a high risk narcotics unit. I sure as hell wouldn’t take that job and more then likely the only people who would take it would be the bottom of society.

    We already have a bad enough police recruitment problem in Atlanta the way it is, let’s try to give these guys the benefit of doubt when possible.

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