Indiana Voter ID

So, Indiana is using a government-photo-ID system in this election for the first time. What kind of widespread problems are they having??

None. Zippo. Nada. Zilch.

Read all about it as folks on both sides of the aisle admit that it’s going swimmingly.

I’m embarrased that the State of Georgia – once leading the way with electronic voting machines – is now behind on the issue of vote integrity.

25 comments

  1. ColinATL says:

    I’m with griftdrift, if you’re going to bitch about vote integrity, then let’s start doing something about absentee voting rather than dealing with the specter of fraud at the polling place.

  2. Clayton says:

    I didn’t say there weren’t capacity/etc. problems, just that the voter ID portion was not an issue.

    So can I assume that when son-of-voter ID resurfaces next year in Georgia, that the chief complaint will now center around absentee ballots and not the photo ID?

  3. ugavi says:

    Clayton,
    Correct, that’s been the latest spin from the dem’s. Although they haven’t offered up any suggestions or plans on how to fix it.

  4. griftdrift says:

    Well I’m not a dem and I don’t have any plan. But common sense tells me that a good place to start with a plan is to address the part that has actually had fraudulent abuse.

  5. Demonbeck says:

    “griftdrift // Nov 7, 2006 at 2:50 pm

    Well I’m not a dem and I don’t have any plan.”

    That statement is so funny, I am unsure of how to respond to it. Here are a couple of choices, feel free to include your own…

    You just summed up the past three election cycles, griftdrift. Excellent job.

    or

    I think I just squirted Diet Coke out my nose…

  6. Demonbeck says:

    I guess I do have to apologize. I could have sworn that said “Well, I’m a dem and I don’t have any plan.” I am sure Mad Dog will have fun with it though.

  7. kspencer says:

    UGAVI, I hope your mistake means you’ve not been paying attention.

    Three times previously this topic’s come up and “no plan for absentee” got a responses with plans – both from individuals such as myself and from folk running for office.

    Here was what I posted last time as modified for my blog:

    1 – An absentee ballot application submitted by mail or by fax must be notarized. The notary block must include a ‘how identified’ section (which happens to be something already required of the notaries of almost every state).
    2 – Absentee ballot applications turned in at the county registrar’s office require the submitter to present ID as though they are voting.
    3 – Absentee voter applications that are “on behalf of” applications can only be submitted at the registrar’s office. Yes, you can submit on someone else’s behalf in Georgia. It’s done, for example, when the actual voter is in the hospital, or college student says to Mom “Help, I need an absentee ballot”, or… It’s a rather generous list of people who can submit applications on behalf of others. However, this line creates a traceable line for fraudulent applications while allowing the ‘on behalf of’ clause to continue.

    So claiming that absentees not only can’t be fixed but that nobody has a plan is incorrect.

  8. GaChick says:

    Diebold and electronic voting is an albatross. There are already reports of people selecting Mark Taylor and getting Sonny Perdue. Electronic voting without a verifiable paper trail is open to hacking and just plain incompetence.

    The Oregon system of voting-by-mail seems to be the best. Ballots are mailed out, you fill them out at home and either mail them in or bring them in personally to voting places. Counting is only started on election day. Sounds like the way to go to me.

  9. Chris says:

    I agree with GaChick. Just mail every registered voter an absentee ballot three weeks out and be done with it.

  10. ugavi says:

    Kurt,
    I guess I missed Buckner’s plan all three times. I also checked her website & didn’t see it there.

    Didn’t realize you were running for office or represented Buckner.

  11. DougieFresh says:

    Ballots and mail are wonderful ideas. Luckily mail is never misdirected, and there is no chance that of another person intercepting the mail and voting for the intended recipient.

    Unconscious spouse, or child in a coma, why not get 2 votes. Recently dead or missing reletive, add another vote.

    Nurse in a hospital, why not vote for the entire ward.

    People have no trouble making up highly black helicopteresque scenarios for electronic balloting, but then the same people like mail in ballots?

    The only votes that should count are the ones cast by people who physically appear at a polling site, identify themselves to poll workers and cast their ballot in secret. Any method that removes the step where the voter identity is confirmed is asking for trouble.

  12. kspencer says:

    UGAVI.

    It’s Kirk, not Kurt. K. I. R. K. I know, it’s petty, but it’s annoying nonetheless.

    Second – I missed that you meant “Buckner” when you said “Correct, that’s been the latest spin from the dem’s. Although they haven’t offered up any suggestions or plans on how to fix it.” Oh, and that you meant “now” about a subject that’s been contentious for literally years.

    I’ll try to brush up on my mind-reading skills to avoid further embarrassment.

    Kirk

  13. Chris says:

    Dougie, let’s work out solutions for all your nightmare prognostication with mail voting.

    Luckily mail is never misdirected, and there is no chance that of another person intercepting the mail and voting for the intended recipient.

    Include a barscan on the return envelope with a tearoff receipt showing a 20-24 digit random number that the voter can use to go online to verify that his ballot was returned and processed properly. If it wasn’t, after waiting a sufficient time for the mail to deliver it, the voter has the option to recast his ballot at the polling place, throwing out the ballot that was previously received in his name.

    If his ballot never arrives to his home in the first place, he’s got ample time to get another, thus voiding the original that was previously issued.

    Unconscious spouse, or child in a coma, why not get 2 votes. Recently dead or missing reletive, add another vote.

    Well a child probably isn’t legally registered to vote, so his being in a coma during election season does nothing but make the parents a bit more stressful than normal. As to the unconscious spouse scenario, chances are the living breathing spouse is more concerned about the recovery of his mate than about stealing her vote while she’s asleep. And if you’re still not comfortable with that, it would be a perfect project for the GOP Nazis to undertake, to make sure all registered voters are alive and well when the ballots are mailed out.

    Nurse in a hospital, why not vote for the entire ward.

    Um, the ballots are mailed to the registered addresses. How many people do you know who are registered to vote at the hospital? In the case of forwarded mail, where the hospital patient has no local next of kin to bring him his ballot, assign a ballot watcher to the hospital’s mailroom to ensure the patient receives his ballot, or returns the ballot with a certified statement that the patient is medically unable to vote by mail.

    Any method that removes the step where the voter identity is confirmed is asking for trouble.

    The voter’s identity should be confirmed at the point of registration.

  14. kspencer says:

    Dougie, I recommend that you review Oregon’s system before dismissing it. At this time, several years after going to 100% mail voting, they have a few interesting numbers.
    Such as consistently high voter participation relative to the nation as a whole.
    Such as consistently low fraud counts (claims, investigations, and prosecutions) relative to the nation as a whole. That’s fraud due to both voter suppression and to false voters.

    It’s not perfect. It just seems to work better than what everyone else is using. Not theoretically “might work better”. Working, in a state in the United States, for about a decade now.

  15. JP says:

    Led the way? Our machines never had a paper trail, ironically the creation-stickering Cobb County is the first to try one.

    Maybe one day Ga. will be a leader, but not yet.

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