Killing a Good Idea

Georgia is at a competitive disadvantage to South Carolina and Florida when it comes to attracting retirees, who can help communities generate sizable local economies.

Georgia law allows community improvement districts for industry, but not for residential development. Essentially, these residential communities — a lot of them exist in Florida — allow developers to build communities by floating taxable bonds, which are then paid for with the revenue of the incoming homeowners.

Senator Staton introduced legislation to make it happen in Georgia. House Minority Leader DuBose Porter has introduced a similar measure in the House. But, Senate Democrats are blocking the measure and it might not get through the Senate. The measure, in the form of a resolution, would be put before voters in November as a constitutional amendment.

i’m kind of surprised the Democrats didn’t let this sail through the Senate and then use it to beat up the GOP in November when the voters get to vote on it — that is, if they think they’d be able to beat up the GOP on what could potentially be a very popular issue.

4 comments

  1. hccitizen says:

    You stated the problem: “Essentially, these residential communities — a lot of them exist in Florida — allow developers to build communities by floating taxable bonds”

    Developers are private individuals or corporations, not government entities. Granting them quasi-government status is absurd. We grant the powers of taxation to our elected governing authorities. We do not, and should not, grant such powers to private enterprise.

    Our taxes support government, from which everyone shares benefit. Allowing taxation to directly support private enterprise removes accountability from the role of elected governing officials.

    Should the private enterprise fail, the homeowner/taxpayer is left holding the bag. No Way.

  2. hccitizen says:

    “only the whites? ” I thought we were talking about developer-politicians and taxation!?!? How did this become an opportunity to place “race games?”

  3. It was an attempt at humor based on the fact that in one of the bills, only landowners would have any say in the governance of these private cities. Renters and other occupants of the house who don’t own it wouldn’t be able to vote and control bonds that they are required to pay back with their tax dollars. Sounds a little like an older system we ditched about 200 years ago.

Comments are closed.