Teachers to get big raise.

UPDATE(4:00 pm): Click here to see Governor Perdue’s Power Point presentation from the Eggs and Issues breakfast. Perdue’s press release following the Breakfast said this:

Fiscal Year 2007 will see an increase in revenue of $1.24 billion over Fiscal Year 2006. Governor Perdue is committed to spending 72 percent of this increase on his aggressive education agenda for the 2006 General Assembly.

“I’ve made listening to our classroom teachers an essential component of my approach to education. Again and again, teachers have told me they want two things – support and respect,

4 comments

  1. Chris says:

    So it sounds like Perdue wants to throw money at the problem while proposing no meaningful reform proposals.

  2. Tommy_a2b says:

    Gotta buy those votes in an election year. Why can’t we have performance based raises???? Senator Eric Johnson if you read this could you comment?
    A->B

  3. kspencer says:

    I wish they’d spend the money more effectively for education. IMO, there are two major reasons the teachers need bought – two problems in the system that have teachers unhappy with the leadership and with performance.

    Problem one is that NCLB is a good idea done wrong. Yes, it’s a national plan, except it was first passed as Uncle Roy’s plan, which is one of the major reason all those teachers voted for Perdue. The standard’s summation is that you will do better, regardless. If you’re already teaching the top-scoring class in the nation, you still have to improve. If you’re teaching special ed, you still have to improve. And at the school level, one class failing one section fails the entire school.

    Problem two is that the single greatest problem I see in the school system is lack of parent involvement. Quite simply, the more parents (both number of parents and time of their participation) are involved the better all the students perform. It seems to be applicable even if there is a high proportion of single parents. When you get a school where the parents write a response to a teacher request that they help their child with homework that, “It’s not OUR job to teach, it’s YOURS,” then you get the schools with poor attendance, poor scores, and poor results.

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